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Master "Forged vs. Cast" or "Blade vs. Game-Improvement" Iron Thread - Page 78

post #1387 of 1423

Isn't that another fault as well, since it isn't a club with out a shaft. Would most casual golfers see that footnote?

post #1388 of 1423

saevel,

 

If you get a chance, check this out:

 

Maltby published a book back in 2005, The Maltby Playability Factor, 287 pages. (ISBN = 978-0927956123). In it, he describes the history of golf club design - especially irons. The book contains full-color engineering drawings of irons from the different eras, comparing their physical features. Also, it gives the MPF data lines for hundreds of models of golf irons, plus their end ratings.

 

The book details how the MPF is calculated. I can tell you're really interested in club design, so I thought you might find it interesting. I was lucky - found three copies on clearance a couple of years back, and bought them all for $1 each.

 

Here's an Amazon link for details.

http://www.amazon.com/Maltby-Playability-Factor-Book-Irons/dp/0927956128/ref=sr_1_14?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1393009162&sr=1-14&keywords=Ralph+Maltby+and+golf

 

If you don't want to buy a copy, you might be able to borrow one from a local clubsmith.

post #1389 of 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post
 

saevel,

 

If you get a chance, check this out:

 

Maltby published a book back in 2005, The Maltby Playability Factor, 287 pages. (ISBN = 978-0927956123). In it, he describes the history of golf club design - especially irons. The book contains full-color engineering drawings of irons from the different eras, comparing their physical features. Also, it gives the MPF data lines for hundreds of models of golf irons, plus their end ratings.

 

The book details how the MPF is calculated. I can tell you're really interested in club design, so I thought you might find it interesting. I was lucky - found three copies on clearance a couple of years back, and bought them all for $1 each.

 

Here's an Amazon link for details.

http://www.amazon.com/Maltby-Playability-Factor-Book-Irons/dp/0927956128/ref=sr_1_14?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1393009162&sr=1-14&keywords=Ralph+Maltby+and+golf

 

If you don't want to buy a copy, you might be able to borrow one from a local clubsmith.


I think you can find it all online now...  My old cobra II's are considered a player's classic iron with a rating of 115...  Man i love those clubs and played some really good golf with them.  I would never have bought them looking at this chart...  not saying it doesn't have some truth, but be careful making judgements just based off the ratings...

post #1390 of 1423
There has probably been a thread on this but I haven't seen it. Just curious to know how good of a player should you be before you start to consider playing with blade irons. I understand they are less forgiving, but I have been curious to try them. I have played cavity back all of my life. I don't know what my handicap is but I can normally shoot mid 70's at my home course (which is an easier course). Just looking for some opinions.
post #1391 of 1423

How much do you want to practice?

post #1392 of 1423
If you're shooting mid 70s, it seems like your already pretty good.

Do you use the whole face of the club?
post #1393 of 1423

Stay cavity. Some of the best players in the world play cavity. Don't over think it and just play your game.

post #1394 of 1423

If you want to play blades don't go full set, just get 7-GW. Shooting in the seventies you must be a fairly good ball striker but I would not go full set because as they progress to the 3 iron they get harder to manage. Do not get an old set say circa 1950/60's as they are like butter knives. The modern blades is much easier to play. The main difference between blades and CB's is forgiveness. 

post #1395 of 1423

Shooting in the mid 70s is good enough for you try blades. You have quite a few good things going on in your swing. Just go buy yourself 5 or 6 iron and give it a try. I practice sometimes with a 6i Hogan blade, and I love the feel of it when I make proper contact with the ball. I even hit the ball farther with that 6i blade compared to my 6i cavity back gamer.

 

Yeah, buy one club and see how it works before buying a whole set.  

post #1396 of 1423
Anyone can go pick up blades and try them... So if you want to, do it.

I played blades (MP-33) for a season in the past, and they did help me become a better ball striker as there is not as much margin for error. It was a struggle, but I'm glad I did it. However, there's a reason I switched back to cavity back irons and will likely continue to play them going forward.
post #1397 of 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by tefunk View Post

Anyone can go pick up blades and try them... So if you want to, do it.

I played blades (MP-33) for a season in the past, and they did help me become a better ball striker as there is not as much margin for error. It was a struggle, but I'm glad I did it. However, there's a reason I switched back to cavity back irons and will likely continue to play them going forward.

I still switch between. . .depend how serious I am about score. a1_smile.gif
post #1398 of 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdhill84 View Post

There has probably been a thread on this but I haven't seen it. Just curious to know how good of a player should you be before you start to consider playing with blade irons. I understand they are less forgiving, but I have been curious to try them. I have played cavity back all of my life. I don't know what my handicap is but I can normally shoot mid 70's at my home course (which is an easier course). Just looking for some opinions.

Define "blades" because there aren't many true "blades" out there today.   If you're shooting in mid 70's you likely have a good consistent swing and wouldn't be hurt by playing something like a Titleist 714MB.  The real question is what do you expect to gain from playing "blades"?

post #1399 of 1423

A number of pros use forged cavity backs for their long and mid irons and blades for their short irons these days. Something to keep in mind. If you're playing well with your clubs why change?

 

And like @newtogolf implied, many companies have their pro lines as a CB/set from 3-7 or 8 iron and go muscleback from 8 or 9 iron - PW only. Unless you buy their full muscleback set, and I think only a few companies make those like Mizuno.

 

 

 

post #1400 of 1423
Musclebacks =/= Blades, amirite?
post #1401 of 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by colin007 View Post

Musclebacks =/= Blades, amirite?


No. They're pretty much the same.

post #1402 of 1423

Hi Everyone,

 

I'll soon be in the market for a new set of irons. Still in the preliminary research process, but the thought of new irons makes me excited. I'm ok with last year's (or a few years back) brands, as I know it will save me a lot of money. I have a question about "blade" irons and "normal" irons.

 

Are blades a club designed for the more consistent golfer? As in someone who can regularly shoot between 5-10 over or better? Correct me if I'm wrong, but I've heard they are a bit more difficult to hit considering the smaller "sweet spot". Are there any advantages to them besides being less clunky? Do they add distance or easier to shape the ball (depending on if you have a solid swing already)? 

 

Any information would be much appreciated!

post #1403 of 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zooz View Post
 

 

Are blades a club designed for the more consistent golfer? As in someone who can regularly shoot between 5-10 over or better? Correct me if I'm wrong, but I've heard they are a bit more difficult to hit considering the smaller "sweet spot". Are there any advantages to them besides being less clunky? Do they add distance or easier to shape the ball (depending on if you have a solid swing already)? 

 

 

If you are talking irons like this, then I'd say they would probably be good for a single digit or lower. It depend on the golfer's comfort level. 

 

 

As for advantages, 

 

They tend to produce better launch conditions for better players who tend to have higher swing speeds. They tend to have less offset which can tend to be visually more appealing towards better players. They tend to have better feel. I think lower handicap players tend to like the look of blade style irons. The better I gotten the smaller I like the clubs to look. 

 

I do believe that they produce slightly more consistent launch conditions for better players because the sweet spot is smaller. I think a larger sweet spot can cause a slight mishit to feel normal and that might make it tougher to find the actual sweet spot consistently. I am not sure how reliable launch conditions are off of thinner face, game improvement irons. 

 

As for shaping the ball, you can curve both game improvement irons and blade irons. 

 

There are a lot of good clubs that have blade style looks, but fit in some GI tech to help better players who are not scratch golfers. 

 

Ping I-series are good

Mizuno MP-H5 or MP-54

Titleist AP2's

Mizuno JPX-Pro

Cobra Fly-Z+

 

These would be clubs that fit that mid to high single digit handicap area that look really good. 

post #1404 of 1423

That's some solid information, I really do appreciate it. Does anyone know the preference of pros? Or is it just that, preference. Meaning they will use whatever they feel works best for them. Or will blades always work best for them because they can consistently strike the ball the way they want?

 

BTW, checked out some of those clubs, woowee they're gorgeous. I really like the minimalist approach to blades. Now to see if I can actually hit them.

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