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"Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals of Golf" by Ben Hogan - Page 23

post #397 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by bddarnell View Post
I feel that I have the grip down the best, my stance is decent compared to Hogan, my backswing and downswing are still works in progress.

I take back alot of what I said about stance and posture, they are more out of whack than I thought. Just throwing that out there in case anyone goes to the my swing thread and watches the vid. Still needs lots of work. I think I'm in decent shape regarding the grip, I started there and haven't been able to poke any holes in it for awhile.

Thanks again to Hacker James.

post #398 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by bddarnell View Post

I take back alot of what I said about stance and posture, they are more out of whack than I thought. Just throwing that out there in case anyone goes to the my swing thread and watches the vid. Still needs lots of work. I think I'm in decent shape regarding the grip, I started there and haven't been able to poke any holes in it for awhile.

Thanks again to Hacker James.

Huh?  what are you thanking me for?  the recommendation? the other two? Finding a paper back ?  just curious, and thank you for thanking me  ha ha...

post #399 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

Huh?  what are you thanking me for?  the recommendation? the other two? Finding a paper back ?  just curious, and thank you for thanking me  ha ha...


:-D All of it!

post #400 of 411

oh OK, then you are very welcome sir

post #401 of 411

I should probably finish this book. I've had it for half a year and got bogged down about halfway through. Can't remember which chapter but I lost interest at some point.

post #402 of 411

I like this book, it's very cause and effect. Hogan has a reason for everything he recommends and tells you why. I found it to be a pretty easy read but to truly retain and use everything that he shows you takes some study and practice. I'm in the stage where I've read the whole book and I'm trying to assimilate and implement things as best I can. I still need to find the right swing plane in order to "groove" my swing properly. I should continue to be in a much better place with my ball striking as I go along with this material.

post #403 of 411

I still find Hogan's book quite useful. Even when I "thought" I knew everything in it, I discover something to go back and check and recheck. As you learn more about your swing, try different things, practice, the illustrations and text in the book become almost "new material" as you find something in it that you didn't quite grasp in the same way.  Its a never ending process. It seems as though no matter what "new" thing I try, or a "tip" I practice, I am always drawn back to the book. Even the so-called modern golf swing(s) have as their fundamental basis, the properties described in the book. There may be a few subtle differences, but the base fundamentals hold true.  I've gotten a lot of "a ha" moments when I go back and read multiple times.

post #404 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacker James View Post

I've gotten a lot of "a ha" moments when I go back and read multiple times.

For me I picked up alot of new things when I first read through the book, but I will often discover when I read it through again I will pick up on something that I missed or something that I thought I understood but Hogan meant another way.

post #405 of 411
I think my handicap is about to drop into single digits for the first time in my life due to this book. I've worked hard to copy everything. Only deviation is stance (foot position always parallel to target line). Whenever I start missing I eventually always realize I deviated from his swing instruction in some way (off plane backswing, weight not slightly more on heels, left elbow not pointing at left hipbone, etc).

Just need to fix my putting and then look out.
post #406 of 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crockme View Post

I think my handicap is about to drop into single digits for the first time in my life due to this book. I've worked hard to copy everything. Only deviation is stance (foot position always parallel to target line). Whenever I start missing I eventually always realize I deviated from his swing instruction in some way (off plane backswing, weight not slightly more on heels, left elbow not pointing at left hipbone, etc).

Just need to fix my putting and then look out.

Yep, there's always something to look back on. Recently, for me, it was not maintaining extension after impact. Going back to his stance and posture, making sure the hollows of elbow were pointing up and elbows pointing at hips kept my arms together and was able to "swing the wedge/triangle" through impact and a little after without collapsing or turning into a chicken wing. It also helped keep the left wrist bowed at impact as keeping the hollows upwards sort of "set" the left wrist even before the swing. It felt like, I could not cup it even if I wanted to.

post #407 of 411
Agree, the hollow of my left arm facing up at address is a key for me. Doing so keeps my left arm straight and probably keeps that triangle together better as you mention.
post #408 of 411

Thanks for the insights.   Your pre torquing to the left at address is counter to Mike Maves pretorquing to the right with the right foot at setup. He calls it "The Move." Is he incorrect?

post #409 of 411

I only took up golf before Christmas (well, November) and I read this over the holidays.

 

I like it a lot. It has stuff for beginners and I love the pictures. I went to look at his swing on YouTube and it really is smooth and easy flowing.

It's a style I would like to emulate as I am not into the idea of bashing it as hard as possible.

 

I confess, I don't get all of it but it's going to be my bedside book to keep referring to as I progress

post #410 of 411

Got the book monday, finished it today. I love reading sportsperson books, but this is only my 2nd golf book (the big miss - 1st).

The only things that have helped my game so far are the knees buckling side to side rather than shooting out in front of you, and trying to keep the arms close to the chest.

 

His alignment section seems out of whack compared to modern standards, and if I suppinate my wrist like his I hook like a ####.

 

Overall a great read.

 

Looking at THE IMPACT ZONE next.

post #411 of 411
This is a good reminder for me to revisit this book. Got it late lat year and only made it part way through as my approach was to read a chapter and practice that lesson for a week or so before moving on to the next in the spirit of "building" my swing. Anxious to get back at it since some things really started to click and show results (mostly the elbow alignment and keeping my right arm close to my body). It is a great reference and/or refresher tool - simple and easy read with great illustrations.
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