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"Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante - Page 2

post #19 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

I read this book and worked on it fairly seriously.

The author recommends a very very tight grip on the club, feeling too soft a grip allows the club to fall out of place at the top

The early wrist break is a push on the left thumb down by the right palm, then just turn the shoulders. This move puts you perfectly coiled and on plane. I found that I could not do the break seamlessly in the backswing but had to bifurcate it, which created tempo problems. Also, the early wrist break made my left elbow very sore, as the left hand is bent sharpley inwards which torques the forearm flexor muscles.

The downward move is a shift of the hips towards the target with NO turn at all. As the hips move forward they will then turn on their own. This is key to this teaching. Hogan's early hip turn to start the downswing is completely wrong and at odds with Dante's method. The arms are locked in place at the top and absolutely do not move in the downswing on their own but are pulled down as Hogan suggests.

The extremely tight grip holds the wrist break so the player can hit through with his hands and let the COAM take its course.

If you can get the early wrist break into a fluid backswing and your left elbow not hurt, this is a good way to swing.
post #20 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by wachesawgolfer View Post
I read this book and worked on it fairly seriously.

The author recommends a very very tight grip on the club, feeling too soft a grip allows the club to fall out of place at the top

The early wrist break is a push on the left thumb down by the right palm, then just turn the shoulders. This move puts you perfectly coiled and on plane. I found that I could not do the break seamlessly in the backswing but had to bifurcate it, which created tempo problems. Also, the early wrist break made my left elbow very sore, as the left hand is bent sharpley inwards which torques the forearm flexor muscles.

The downward move is a shift of the hips towards the target with NO turn at all. As the hips move forward they will then turn on their own. This is key to this teaching. Hogan's early hip turn to start the downswing is completely wrong and at odds with Dante's method. The arms are locked in place at the top and absolutely do not move in the downswing on their own but are pulled down as Hogan suggests.

The extremely tight grip holds the wrist break so the player can hit through with his hands and let the COAM take its course.

If you can get the early wrist break into a fluid backswing and your left elbow not hurt, this is a good way to swing.
When I first practiced the early backward wrist break I said to myself "this can't be right" as it felt different...almost strange.

However I kept with it and have noticed extraordinary results!

As far as I'm concerned this "early backward wrist break" is like finding the holy grail to the golf swing...

--John
post #21 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by wachesawgolfer View Post
Hogan's early hip turn to start the downswing is completely wrong and at odds with Dante's method.
Look at video of Hogans swing from the rear and you can see that his right hip rotates completely to the rear and to the target in the backswing. His weight settles into his left leg AS PART OF HIS BACKSWING. So he needs no intentional lateral shift during transition. As a result, all he needs to do in the downswing is rotate his left hip to the top of a posted left leg. He did not describe this crucial aspect in his book but there are multiple sources of this info on the web.
post #22 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

The magic move to golf is quite simply the early backward wrist break. This motion of the hand, straight back, is the backward wrist break.


The way the right hand should move from the wrist in the early backward break-straight back toward the outside of the forearm, with no turning or rolling.

The conventional wrist break is quite different. Hold your hand again as you held it before. Now, instead of bending it backward, bend it up, so that the thumb comes toward you. That is the orthodox, accepted wrist break. Forget it. You will no longer need it.

To make the backward wrist break we merely push the heel of the right hand down against the big knuckle of the left thumb. This is a downward pressure of the heel on the thumb. When it is done, without moving the hands otherwise, the right hand breaks backward at the wrist and the left hand breaks forward or inward, the back of the left hand going under and facing, in a general way, toward the ground.
post #23 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by lynchjo View Post
"Four Magic Moves" teaches the early backward wrist break - when I first tried this so called "magic move" I said "you gotta be kidding me".

I gotta tell ya, after I kept practicing this one early move in the golf swing the golf club began to feel much lighter as I swung...could it be that I am now swinging on plane?

Anyway, this one move made an incredible difference in my golf swing.

If you're gonna try this golf system out make sure you practice the moves over and over and let them sink in...your first inclination (like mine) will probably be to discard it as rubbish...stay with it and you may be in for a pleasant surprise.

--John

I tried this wrist-break this weekend and I could not get used to it. Any advice. I was very inconsistent. My problem with it is I am not sure if I am doing it correctly or not. I hate to use results as a guide.
post #24 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by Norm3333 View Post
I tried this wrist-break this weekend and I could not get used to it. Any advice. I was very inconsistent. My problem with it is I am not sure if I am doing it correctly or not. I hate to use results as a guide.
Hi Norm,

Since the backward wrist break is the first move in the backswing, let's be absolutely certain you understand what it is.

First, hold your right hand in front of you, fingers together and extended, thumb up and the palm squarely facing the left. From that position bend the hand to the right, trying to make the fingers come back toward the outside of the wrist. You can't get them anywhere near the wrist, of course, but a person with supple wrists can bend the hand back until hand and wrist form a right angle.

This motion of the hand, straight back, is the backward wrist break...


The way the right hand should move from the wrist in the early backward break-straight back toward the outside of the forearm, with no turning or rolling.

The conventional wrist break is quite different. Hold your hand again as you held it before. Now, instead of bending it backward, bend it up, so that the thumb comes toward you. That is the orthodox, accepted wrist break. Forget it. You will no longer need it.

To make the backward wrist break we merely push the heel of the right hand down against the big knuckle of the left thumb. This is a downward pressure of the heel on the thumb. When it is done, without moving the hands otherwise, the right hand breaks backward at the wrist and the left hand breaks forward or inward, the back of the left hand going under and facing, in a general way, toward the ground.


How the backward break is made, with the heel of the right hand pressing down on the knuckle of the left thumb. The back of the left hand begins to turn down and under.

How not to make the break. Wrists and hands have rolled, the back of the left hand has turned upward. The right hand is rolling too, instead of bending straight back.

At this point the club will have come back slightly inside the projected line of flight but the club face will not have opened. The face will be at about a 45-degree angle with the ground and, as you stand there, you will not be able to see any of it.

We have not put this into the actual swing yet, remember. We are still working on the biomechanics of the wrist break. At this fundamental stage in your backswing you may refuse to believe that you can hit the ball with such a break. So make this test....

"Go To The Practice Tee, Or To A Range Or An Indoor Net. Address The Ball. Make The Backward Break And Do Nothing Else!”

Don't shift your weight, move your hips, or turn your shoulders. Just make the backward break. Hold it a couple of seconds. Now simply turn your shoulders, letting the shoulders swing your arms and the club up to the top, and then go right on through with the swing and hit the ball.

At first this will be a deliberate move, the more you practice this it will become more fluid as you blend the wrist break with the shoulder turn.

Stay with it!

You’ll be amazed at what happens after you try this a few times. You will find, if you keep the wrist position, you not only hit the ball, but that you hit it solidly, hit it straight, and hit it a surprisingly long distance.

You will also discover the more you permit the turning shoulders to swing the club up, the better you will hit the ball and the farther you will hit it. Make no effort to swing the arms, just let the shoulders move them and the club. The more the arms are swung independently of the shoulders, the less likely you are to reach a good position at the top. So picture the shoulders as the motivating force, the "motor."


Here is what you should see when you make the backward break perfectly - only one knuckle of the left hand but two knuckles of the right.

The closer you bring this motivating force to the axis of the swing (the spinal column) the better the swing will be.

Try this out Norm and lemme know how you make out.

Hit 'em Long & Straight!

--John
post #25 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

By just paroozing this thread it seems to me that anyone using this method who doesnt have a PhD in the golf swing whould hit alot of hooks...especially that wrist break move... but different strokes i guess...
post #26 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

John,
Thanks for the tip. I snuck out of work and hit a small bucket.

Unreal!!! It took me a few swings to sort of get comfortable with it. Then the magic happened.

I hit so many great 7 irons with it, I broke out my 5 and hit at least 17 great draws in a row. I pured one so well, I was amazed. I've never pured one like that again. I will hit at least a large bucket today.

Out of 60 balls, I hit about 4 crappy, and the rest were great. My highest percentage ever.

Thanks,
Norm
post #27 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

As a followup to my previous post. IMO, this move has ended up being a very difficult move to repeat. I initially had great success with it, but it proved to be more difficult. I have since forced myself to have a flat wrist on a "normal" backswing. IMO, a lot more repeatable and a more consistent swing.

I just bought the Bobby Clampett book, and have had a lot more success with what he espouses. IMO.
post #28 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Here is what you should see when you make the early backward wrist break perfectly - only one knuckle of the left hand but two knuckles of the right.



The closer you bring this motivating force to the axis of the swing (the spinal column) the better the swing will be.

Learn how one simple "magic move" (which you can easily feed into your current swing in just 7 minutes, even if you stink at the game right now) instantly uncorks so much hidden raw power, balance and accuracy... That you can go out tomorrow and launch a pin-point 230-yard tee shot with a 3-wood...From your knees!
post #29 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

I just reread the book and am going to give it another try. I like the fact the early break he describes puts the club perfectly on plane at the top if you can judge from a "swingguide" attachment. I have always felt the reason people are so inconsistent is inconsistent backswings and this technique minimizes that faults of being too steep or too shallow, laid off or armsy in the backswing.
post #30 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

I haven't tried this, but it seems that you would hit a lot of hooks if you left your club face that closed.
post #31 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

I did hit some unreal shots with it but ultimately couldn't repeat the motion without my wrist hurting. I think it's real merit is to stress the importance of a square, set, left wrist at the top of the backswing.

In a way it reminds me of the modern, strong left-hand swing of players like David Duval. There really isn't much manipulation of the clubhead. It's a hold-on, arm swing.
post #32 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by beachbreak View Post
I did hit some unreal shots with it but ultimately couldn't repeat the motion without my wrist hurting. I think it's real merit is to stress the importance of a square, set, left wrist at the top of the backswing.

In a way it reminds me of the modern, strong left-hand swing of players like David Duval. There really isn't much manipulation of the clubhead. It's a hold-on, arm swing.
That is why I quit doing the Dante method, my left elbow hurt. You explained why.
post #33 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by ted dibiase View Post
I haven't tried this, but it seems that you would hit a lot of hooks if you left your club face that closed.
Nope, sliced the heck out of them as everything can get locked out and no release of the club.
post #34 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

The picture that is shown with the early wrist break is how I want to be as I come through the ball. However, I can't do it at the beginning of my swing. Makes it a very jerky, unsmooth backswing.
post #35 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

Originally Posted by Norm3333 View Post
The picture that is shown with the early wrist break is how I want to be as I come through the ball. However, I can't do it at the beginning of my swing. Makes it a very jerky, unsmooth backswing.
Hi Norm,

Try doing the early backward wrist break without doing anything else. Don't shift your weight, move your hips, or turn your shoulders. Just make the backward break. Hold it a couple of seconds. Now simply turn your shoulders, letting the shoulders swing your arms and the club up to the top, and then go right on through with the swing and hit the ball.



You’ll be amazed at what happens after you try this a few times. You will find, if you keep the wrist position, you not only hit the ball, but that you hit it solidly, hit it straight, and hit it a surprisingly long distance.

You will also discover the more you permit the turning shoulders to swing the club up, the better you will hit the ball and the farther you will hit it. Make no effort to swing the arms, just let the shoulders move them and the club. The more the arms are swung independently of the shoulders, the less likely you are to reach a good position at the top. So picture the shoulders as the motivating force, the "motor."

You will be a little "herky jerky" at first till this becomes ingrained - stay with it!

Play well.
post #36 of 87

Re: "Four Magic Moves" by Joe Dante

This is a bit unconventional, for sure. Most teachers want the toe up at 3:00 O'clock, some will permit the club face on the spine angle, but I have not heard the 45 degree angle advocated for decades. But, I learned to play doing this type of wrist cock back in the days of the reverse C finish. I've spend many years trying to reduce the draw shape of shots after first learning the one knuckle on the left hand right hand back takeaway . It does produce solid feeling shots, but I think you have to really hold off on the release if you do this. It is a good way to learn to draw the ball. So, I'm not taking positions other than to say this is not often taught today, and I wish I had not started out doing this.

No doubt many can play good golf swinging this way because many years ago, a lot of people taught a variation of this technique. Be sure and clear the left hip hard and post up completely or you can become a strong duck hooker. You cannot have lazy hips and do this (but you can't have lazy hips anyway.) Just my opinion.
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