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the backswing

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
hey
i've been playing golf for a few months now and i've recently noticed something i've been doing on the backswing.

when i take the club away from the ball, i rotate my forearms quite a bit which makes the club face open, so that the face is pointing about 20 degrees past verticle when the shaft is horizontal.

this makes me feel like im able to swing far more freely and i get the feeling on a slightly flatter plane.

this method gives me much more consistently solid impact. When i time the 're-rotation' of my forearms right, the ball goes further and straighter, but sometimes with a draw.

so i was wondering, should i keep this method, even though (i think) its not technically correct, or should i wait till Ben Hogan's 5 lessons book arrives in a few days and try and get a more backswing/take-away based on what he says.

sorry for the essay, any help would be appreciated

mike
post #2 of 10

Re: the backswing

If your not slicing the ball, but able to draw it nicely, don't fix what isn't broken. Most teachers like to see toe up or slightly closed at 9 oclock where the club is parallel and butt pointing down the line of target. If your open, you need some compensating move or grip to resquare the club at imapct, if you do.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Re: the backswing

one extra thing; im get this draw with short irons, and im worried it will turn into a big, uncontrollable draw with the longer irons, any thoughts ?
post #4 of 10

Re: the backswing

Yeah, you could be right about the long irons. You get more side spin than with the short irons. It is going to be problematic to time the closing of the clubface perfectly square when you have to close it that much. If it works for you consistently then go ahead and use it.
post #5 of 10

Re: the backswing

From what I'm getting is if your turning your forarms to get the face to open up your not making much of a shoulder turn if any and your only hitting with the arms.
post #6 of 10

Re: the backswing

Left forearm pronation (clockwise rotation) was a Hogan move to flatten the plane (without going inside) and maximize right wrist hinge (lag) in the backswing.

Squaring the clubhead by impact is automatic if you use Hogan's 'body release' where the clubhead closes naturally by following the core rotation around to the left. Unfortunately the popular 'crossover release' closes the clubhead by rolling the forearms which requires exact timing. A second disadvantage is that you sling the club down the line which stalls core rotation after impact.

A body release is effected by keeping your left arm connected to your left armpit as you turn and keeping the core rotating after impact. The club head squares itself without need for critical timing or manipulation.
post #7 of 10

Re: the backswing

Originally Posted by golfchief View Post
From what I'm getting is if your turning your forarms to get the face to open up your not making much of a shoulder turn if any and your only hitting with the arms.

I think this is very true. I've seen it many times on videos at Swing Academy. Arms lift, forearms roll and the club is already behind you with minimum shoulder turn.
post #8 of 10

Re: the backswing

Originally Posted by tm22721 View Post
Left forearm pronation (clockwise rotation) was a Hogan move to flatten the plane (without going inside) and maximize right wrist hinge (lag) in the backswing.

Squaring the clubhead by impact is automatic if you use Hogan's 'body release' where the clubhead closes naturally by following the core rotation around to the left. Unfortunately the popular 'crossover release' closes the clubhead by rolling the forearms which requires exact timing. A second disadvantage is that you sling the club down the line which stalls core rotation after impact.

A body release is effected by keeping your left arm connected to your left armpit as you turn and keeping the core rotating after impact. The club head squares itself without need for critical timing or manipulation.
Yep dead on. Basically three ways to release the club.

Forearm Rotation

Hogan Body Release

Passive Release DTL from Body Pivot

The last is the least used today (all swing, no hit). It involves a strong grip, and subduing any hit impulse. The hands and arms are propelled by the lower body. Was a very popular method back in the 50s, and still works fantastic today. See the book "Essentials of the Golf Swing" by John Redman (instructor to Paul Azinger) if you are interested in trying this. A very easy way to swing once you defeat all the forearm crossover habits.

I would have to say, based on my experience thus far, the Hogan method produces best compression, but requires more core and upper body strength (it feels more to me like swatting the ball with the body, than a smooth flowing swing). Check out slicefixer on golfwrx.com if you want to try this methodology. It's a great way to get the feel of ball compression.

The forearm rotation method is the least accurate and requires the greatest number of compensations. It is however the most commonly taught. Why? Um... who knows...
post #9 of 10

Re: the backswing

I would keep that swing if it works temporary but would work on shortening the backswing at parallal or less. Try lower your rear shoulder so that it limits your backswing and slowly take your club back in a one piece motion. Start your downswing with your hips and extend your arms as in hitting a baseball, your wrist will break naturally creating more speed effortlessly and the ball flight will be more controlled.

I have been playing for 23 years and finally found that shortening your backswing keeps you accurate with all your clubs including your driver. Less moving parts as they say on TV about certain pro golfers.

I am now hitting my irons and driver better than ever and more importantly with confidence that I know that my missed will be a tighter pattern.
post #10 of 10

Re: the backswing

Originally Posted by ks8829 View Post
I would keep that swing if it works temporary but would work on shortening the backswing at parallal or less. Try lower your rear shoulder so that it limits your backswing and slowly take your club back in a one piece motion. Start your downswing with your hips and extend your arms as in hitting a baseball, your wrist will break naturally creating more speed effortlessly and the ball flight will be more controlled.

I have been playing for 23 years and finally found that shortening your backswing keeps you accurate with all your clubs including your driver. Less moving parts as they say on TV about certain pro golfers.

I am now hitting my irons and driver better than ever and more importantly with confidence that I know that my missed will be a tighter pattern.
Thanks, that sounds like real good advice. I was having a problem at the range yesterday where I was slicing and not getting any distance with all my clubs, and one older pro suggested I was not starting the swing with my hips, or following through properly by extending my arms. I will try your suggestions with lowering my shoulder as well, tomorrow at the range.
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