or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › Average swing weight and length on tour
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Average swing weight and length on tour - Page 2

post #19 of 22

Old thread, but since it has come back up...

 

One thing to keep in mind is that static weight (the overall weight of a club) and the swing weight of a club are not necessarily related. For example, switching a 80 g shaft and 30 g grip to a 90 g shaft and 40 g grip (total increase of static weight of 20 g) will theoretically decrease the swing weight of a club (although the actual change may be immaterial depending on the mass of the club head). Conversely, adding 20 g of weight to the club head will drastically increase the swing weight. In this example, you have two clubs that have the same static weight (and therefore mass) but with a very different swing weight.

 

In the end, swing speed is the more crucial variable in calculating ball speed. The formula is vball = ((vclub*(1.67))/(1.0+(mball/mclub))) where vball = ball speed at impact, vclub = velocity of club head at impact, mball = mass of the golf ball, and mclub = mass of the club. To illustrate the point, a club with mass of 200g traveling at 100 mph will cause a ball weighing 45.9262 g to launch at 135.81 mph. An increase of just 2 mph in club head speed will result in an increase in ball speed of approximately 3 mph. To achieve the same increase without changing club head speed, the mass of the club would have to be increased by about 24 g. And at that point, you likely won't be able to keep the same club head speed. Of course this formula does not take into account certain physical properties of the ball and club, such as MOI in the club. However, all things held constant, the illustration still works, I think.

 

The whole point is that you have to find the static weight and swing weight that give you the highest possible ball speed.        

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post
 

Old thread, but since it has come back up...

 

One thing to keep in mind is that static weight (the overall weight of a club) and the swing weight of a club are not necessarily related. For example, switching a 80 g shaft and 30 g grip to a 90 g shaft and 40 g grip (total increase of static weight of 20 g) will theoretically decrease the swing weight of a club (although the actual change may be immaterial depending on the mass of the club head). Conversely, adding 20 g of weight to the club head will drastically increase the swing weight. In this example, you have two clubs that have the same static weight (and therefore mass) but with a very different swing weight.

 

In the end, swing speed is the more crucial variable in calculating ball speed. The formula is vball = ((vclub*(1.67))/(1.0+(mball/mclub))) where vball = ball speed at impact, vclub = velocity of club head at impact, mball = mass of the golf ball, and mclub = mass of the club. To illustrate the point, a club with mass of 200g traveling at 100 mph will cause a ball weighing 45.9262 g to launch at 135.81 mph. An increase of just 2 mph in club head speed will result in an increase in ball speed of approximately 3 mph. To achieve the same increase without changing club head speed, the mass of the club would have to be increased by about 24 g. And at that point, you likely won't be able to keep the same club head speed. Of course this formula does not take into account certain physical properties of the ball and club, such as MOI in the club. However, all things held constant, the illustration still works, I think.

 

The whole point is that you have to find the static weight and swing weight that give you the highest possible ball speed.        

 

 

Yea that is just a collision formula. 

 

Smash Factor = (1+COR)/(1+(Mb/Mc))

 

Lets say you are able to swing a driver that is 200 grams clubhead weight. 

 

Vc = 100 mph

COR = 0.83

Mb = 46 grams

Mc = 200 grams

 

Smash Factor = 1.488

Max Vball = 148.8 mph

 

Lets drop that to 190 club head weight

 

Smash Factor = 1.473

Max Vball = 147.3 mph

 

So for you to hit the ball the same distance with the lighter club head, you'd need to increase the club head speed by just little over 1 mph.

 

I think the issue is this. Golfers are only swinging a 300 gram driver (total weight). 0.65-0.7 lb golf club. That isn't that heavy. I think majority of the time, people are able to swing the golf club with in a very close proximity to their max swing speed. Meaning dropping the clubhead 10 grams, you are not going to see much difference in swing speed. I am talking theoretical Max velocities capable. I am assuming these are perfect dead center hits on the clubface. Lighter clubs are harder to control. So in all retrospect, it is probably a wash. 

 

All driver heads are usually under 210 grams. That is the max by trial and error that golfers can swing a driver and not loose clubhead speed. Usually they range from 180-200 grams. 

 

As for OP, I believe most tour professions like heavier clubs. I am not talking heavier swing weights. They will get their clubs weight to fit the feel they want. Typically most golf professionals like heavy driver shafts (70+ grams), and heavy iron shafts (130+ grams). One it is for control, and two golfers are strong when it comes to swinging a golf club. Highest controllable swing speeds outside of long distance drivers. The stronger you are the more weight you need to feel the club. Ask a guy who lifts weights every day what he thinks is a light weight for a bicep curl. Then ask a newbie to lift the same weight. 

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

 

Yea that is just a collision formula. 

 

Smash Factor = (1+COR)/(1+(Mb/Mc))

 

Lets say you are able to swing a driver that is 200 grams clubhead weight. 

 

Vc = 100 mph

COR = 0.83

Mb = 46 grams

Mc = 200 grams

 

Smash Factor = 1.488

Max Vball = 148.8 mph

 

Lets drop that to 190 club head weight

 

Smash Factor = 1.473

Max Vball = 147.3 mph

 

So for you to hit the ball the same distance with the lighter club head, you'd need to increase the club head speed by just little over 1 mph.

 

Gotcha. It all comes back to finding the magical point where club head speed and club weight are optimized.  

 

To the OP, I've always preferred heavier clubs, both in static weight and swing weight. I don't know know the exact static weight of my irons, but they are definitely heavier than most stock irons with steel shaft, and are swing weighted to D6. I don't like the feel of really light irons, and lower swing weights seem harder for me to control. When I have time to get back into playing and practicing more this summer, I'm going to experiment with them a little to see if the results change any. 

post #22 of 22

I didn't see how old this thread was, but I noticed the tennis comparison and I agree, being a former tennis player. Heavy racquets hit the ball harder and it should be the same for golf clubs. Even more so. I have sensed, when hitting light drivers, the head stopping slightly at impact. In other words, losing speed. Heavier drivers don't give me that feel, just a power through the ball. Heavier irons, whether heavier in shaft or head will not give that slight slow down when hitting slightly fat, or just hitting the ball. It will transfer the force better. Now this is from a guy who knows absolutely nothing about science.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › Average swing weight and length on tour