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Caddies lining up putts for their players - Page 2

Poll Results: Should caddies be allowed to line up putts for their players?

 
  • 46% (37)
    Yes
  • 53% (42)
    No
79 Total Votes  
post #19 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

Originally Posted by RC View Post
A unique situation arises when hitting to a blind target (such as an approach where you cannot see the flag.) The caddie can go forward and stand or indicate the line of flight, but before the stroke, I think he should move away from the line. I don't remember whether this is required
It is required that they move away.

The only problem I really have with players lining themselves up is that it seems to slow down play sometimes.

Beyond that, it seems like a crutch. If a pro golfer needs another person to help him line up, then he or she almost seems to be admitting defeat.

If it were made illegal, I wouldn't care much (though I do think you should still be allowed to indicate where the target is per the quoted part above), but as it stands right now, legal, I also don't care much.
post #20 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

I don't think it's a big deal at all. There's no rule against it, so it should be allowed.
post #21 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

Its not a big deal. Most of those guys on the different tours probably played without caddies for most of their jr golf and college days, so if they're on tour they can do it alone if they need to. But if you can have help from time to time, why not take it?
post #22 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

Originally Posted by lordnazgul2 View Post
The caddie is not allowed to place the ball on the ground for the player, and is therefore not allowed to physically line it up, how is standing behind their player telling them to move an inch left any different to that?
The caddie can place the ball for the player if he lifted it.

From Rule 20-1:
A ball to be lifted under the Rules may be lifted by the player, his partner or another person authorized by the player.

From Rule 20-3 (a):
If a ball is to be replaced, the player, his partner or the person who lifted or moved it must place it on the spot from which it was lifted or moved.

I don't see what the big deal is. I could sort of see the logic behind no standing on the line after address, except you'd have to be more subtle to make this work since you could hover the putter while being aimed to avoid addressing the ball. As someone said above, golf is a de facto team game when you consider the existence of caddies.
post #23 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

I would have to respond with "no." They are the professionals, they should do all of the work themselves. The caddies job is to carry the clubs and help with distances, not to basically play the game themselves.
post #24 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

I think it sucks.

But it's legal, and can't fault a guy or gal for taking every possible advantage allowed if they want.

I vote for outlawing it, not that it means anything.
post #25 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

i'm going to say no for the reason stated in the very first post here - if the golfer can't do it themselves, they shouldn't be out there in the first place. a caddy's job is to cite yardages and carry/clean the clubs.
post #26 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

I am personally against it myself due to the facts that most people are saying, these are professionals playing a game that they get paid to do. I would even go so far to say i dont like caddies helping them read the shot, you have someone helping hold your gear and that is where it should end.

In a friendly game of golf help your friends out, when your getting paid to play your best you shouldn’t need anyone else.
post #27 of 40

Re: Caddies lining up putts for their players

Originally Posted by lordnazgul2 View Post
Here is one for thought, do you think that a caddie should be allowed to line up a putt for their player....I personally think that it should not be allowed and here is the reason....If a professional is unable to line themselves up to putt then as far as i am concerned they have a major flaw and therefore are not good enough to play the highest level....
I voted yes though I don't care all that much. After all, the player still has to execute the putt correctly.
post #28 of 40

Thank you.  I was wondering if anybody notices on the LPGA that many had their caddy to line up EVERY shot, especially the Asian country female golfers.  It feels like cheating.

post #29 of 40

Please provide a reference to a rule or decision to support your statement: "The caddie is not allowed to place the ball on the ground for the player". My readings of the rules allow the player, partner, or any authorised person to mark and/or place the ball." 

 

And I can't seem to find any ruling that prohibits the player, partner, or authorised person (e.g,, caddy) from lining up the ball while placing it. 

 

Mae Jo Captain

post #30 of 40
Next thing you know caddies will be laying out their clothes for the day, doing their laundry, etc.
post #31 of 40

if a caddie is not allowed to line up a putt or a shot in general there wouldn't be an LPGA....seriously there are many players there who get lined up on every swing by the caddie. silly in my opinion.

post #32 of 40
Caddies should be lining up putts on the practice green but not in competition.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulligan Jeff View Post

Caddies should be lining up putts on the practice green but not in competition.

 

Why?  The caddie is there to assist the player, not just be a beast of burden.  He helps to choose the right club, paces off yardages, does any number of detailed tasks to help the player as he plays his round.  The rules bar the caddie specifically from doing a few things, but the rest is fair game.  They often read greens better than the player does, do a better job of picking the line of the putt, and that is part of the job - always has been.  If you go to Scotland and play with a caddie, he will help his player with aiming his tee shots and reading the greens, picking a line for putting.  I see nothing at all wrong with helping the player with his alignment before the stroke.  You are allowed to lay a club down on the ground to help you with your alignment for a shot as long as it is removed before you make your stroke.  I don't see any difference having the caddie do the same thing. 

 
The player and caddie are a team, and with a few restrictions for the caddie, they are both allowed to perform many of the same tasks, and they face the same penalties for any breach of the rules.  It's been that way since the job of caddie was created, and I don't see anything wrong with what they do.
 
Has anyone actually done any research as to the efficacy of having the caddie assist with alignment?  Is there any quantitative data to show that any given player is actually a better putter for it?  Or is it just more of a psychological boost.
post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

Why?  The caddie is there to assist the player, not just be a beast of burden.  He helps to choose the right club, paces off yardages, does any number of detailed tasks to help the player as he plays his round.  The rules bar the caddie specifically from doing a few things, but the rest is fair game.  They often read greens better than the player does, do a better job of picking the line of the putt, and that is part of the job - always has been.  If you go to Scotland and play with a caddie, he will help his player with aiming his tee shots and reading the greens, picking a line for putting.  I see nothing at all wrong with helping the player with his alignment before the stroke.  You are allowed to lay a club down on the ground to help you with your alignment for a shot as long as it is removed before you make your stroke.  I don't see any difference having the caddie do the same thing.

 
The player and caddie are a team, and with a few restrictions for the caddie, they are both allowed to perform many of the same tasks, and they face the same penalties for any breach of the rules.  It's been that way since the job of caddie was created, and I don't see anything wrong with what they do.
 
Has anyone actually done any research as to the efficacy of having the caddie assist with alignment?  Is there any quantitative data to show that any given player is actually a better putter for it?  Or is it just more of a psychological boost.

 

Ahhh back from a golf trip and on to the TST. I understand your thinking Fourputt and I agree that the caddie is more than someone who simply carries the bag - however aiding in the players alignment on the green or anywhere on the course for that matter appears to be an unfair advantage from my standpoint. And I can't remember seeing a player in tournament conditions put down a club or alignment sticks to help him or her before the stroke. In practice sessions absolutely positively yes use as many training aids as possible for alignment, stroke, gaining driving distance, honing in your iron play and all that. In tournament conditions that's when the player hitches up their trousers and sets off to conquer on their own.

post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulligan Jeff View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

Why?  The caddie is there to assist the player, not just be a beast of burden.  He helps to choose the right club, paces off yardages, does any number of detailed tasks to help the player as he plays his round.  The rules bar the caddie specifically from doing a few things, but the rest is fair game.  They often read greens better than the player does, do a better job of picking the line of the putt, and that is part of the job - always has been.  If you go to Scotland and play with a caddie, he will help his player with aiming his tee shots and reading the greens, picking a line for putting.  I see nothing at all wrong with helping the player with his alignment before the stroke.  You are allowed to lay a club down on the ground to help you with your alignment for a shot as long as it is removed before you make your stroke.  I don't see any difference having the caddie do the same thing.

 
The player and caddie are a team, and with a few restrictions for the caddie, they are both allowed to perform many of the same tasks, and they face the same penalties for any breach of the rules.  It's been that way since the job of caddie was created, and I don't see anything wrong with what they do.
 
Has anyone actually done any research as to the efficacy of having the caddie assist with alignment?  Is there any quantitative data to show that any given player is actually a better putter for it?  Or is it just more of a psychological boost.

 

Ahhh back from a golf trip and on to the TST. I understand your thinking Fourputt and I agree that the caddie is more than someone who simply carries the bag - however aiding in the players alignment on the green or anywhere on the course for that matter appears to be an unfair advantage from my standpoint. And I can't remember seeing a player in tournament conditions put down a club or alignment sticks to help him or her before the stroke. In practice sessions absolutely positively yes use as many training aids as possible for alignment, stroke, gaining driving distance, honing in your iron play and all that. In tournament conditions that's when the player hitches up their trousers and sets off to conquer on their own.

 

How can it be an advantage or unfair when it's available to all players?  That isn't even a reasonable argument.  If you were playing at the level where a caddie was a regular part of the game, you would use him in any way allowed to help you win.  I really don't understand why this particular task is singled out as distasteful while the other caddie duties seem to be okay.  It's still the player who has to make the stroke, to bring the club back on the right plane to hopefully hit the ball where the caddie aims him.  

 

Admit it - the only reason you have for disliking it is that you just don't like how it looks on TV.  There is no other argument that holds water, and even that one is leaking like a boat made out of knotty pine. :doh:

 
 
:smartass: By the way, the player is not allowed to use alignment sticks or any other training device during a stipulated round.  However, he may use a club in such a fashion as long as it is removed before he makes his stroke.
post #36 of 40

I played in a tournament yesterday where caddies were assigned to each foursome, I'm a believer.  Having someone, who knows the greens, tell you where to aim and the relative green speed makes a big difference.  I haven't done the statistics yet, but I'd guess I cut at least 1/2 putt per hole off my average, maybe more.

 

As for whether the LPGA should allow it?  I get the argument that its available to all players but in my opinion it takes away some of the skills the pro needs to have and assigns them to the caddie.  I don't have an issue with consulting with a caddie, discussing club selection, etc but when a caddie gives you the line and relative speed it does make putting easier.  If I had a competent caddie out with me every round reading greens and lining up putts for me I'm confident I'd drop at least 6 strokes off my handicap.

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