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post #37 of 59

if your enamored of these things you had better get a brand new ball and measure it otherwise its self defeating. If your tested on dud house balls forget about it. I have seen a kid in sandals of medium size with a weekenders swing record a 335 yard shot on Foresight at Golfsmith. Sorry, no way he hits it that far on the range, no way Jose. It might have been a 275 yard shot at best. I saw a while back a top level kid 6'6", 26 years old, terrifically fast swing, playing competition golf for many years record a 125mph swing on Foresight. The swing was considerably faster than that imo probably much closer to 138-40.  I think our love of gadgets and data can sometimes get in the way. We want control. We fear not being in control. To accurately measure distannce and launch and ball spin and accuracy all I need is two eyes and the range and some decent range balls within 5-10% of max flight. And these devices make a lot of money for the stores, draw in customers and create an unnecessary hierarchy between techies and players.

post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post

if your enamored of these things you had better get a brand new ball and measure it otherwise its self defeating. If your tested on dud house balls forget about it. I have seen a kid in sandals of medium size with a weekenders swing record a 335 yard shot on Foresight at Golfsmith. Sorry, no way he hits it that far on the range, no way Jose. It might have been a 275 yard shot at best. I saw a while back a top level kid 6'6", 26 years old, terrifically fast swing, playing competition golf for many years record a 125mph swing on Foresight. The swing was considerably faster than that imo probably much closer to 138-40.  I think our love of gadgets and data can sometimes get in the way. We want control. We fear not being in control. To accurately measure distannce and launch and ball spin and accuracy all I need is two eyes and the range and some decent range balls within 5-10% of max flight. And these devices make a lot of money for the stores, draw in customers and create an unnecessary hierarchy between techies and players.

no Way anyone could hit it 335 wearing sandals of medium size ;)

Wouldn't beat up balls likely underestimate distance? I am going to try to hit balls on a track man this weekend and thought about whether I should hit my own balls. The difference probably isn't very much, though.
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post

no Way anyone could hit it 335 wearing sandals of medium size ;)

Wouldn't beat up balls likely underestimate distance? I am going to try to hit balls on a track man this weekend and thought about whether I should hit my own balls. The difference probably isn't very much, though.

 

You can "normalize" ball flight too, even if you're hitting limited distance balls. TrackMan and FlightScopes will report the "regular ball distance" then.

 

I don't think TM/FS are less accurate than someone's eyes… @buddhabob. I can't speak for the ForeSight. It's a camera based system that relies on (I think) proper placement of stickers, etc.

post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post

if your enamored of these things you had better get a brand new ball and measure it otherwise its self defeating. If your tested on dud house balls forget about it. I have seen a kid in sandals of medium size with a weekenders swing record a 335 yard shot on Foresight at Golfsmith. Sorry, no way he hits it that far on the range, no way Jose. It might have been a 275 yard shot at best. I saw a while back a top level kid 6'6", 26 years old, terrifically fast swing, playing competition golf for many years record a 125mph swing on Foresight. The swing was considerably faster than that imo probably much closer to 138-40.  I think our love of gadgets and data can sometimes get in the way. We want control. We fear not being in control. To accurately measure distannce and launch and ball spin and accuracy all I need is two eyes and the range and some decent range balls within 5-10% of max flight. And these devices make a lot of money for the stores, draw in customers and create an unnecessary hierarchy between techies and players.

no Way anyone could hit it 335 wearing sandals of medium size ;)

Wouldn't beat up balls likely underestimate distance? I am going to try to hit balls on a track man this weekend and thought about whether I should hit my own balls. The difference probably isn't very much, though.

What if the sandals were large? Or medium large?
post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by 14ledo81 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post

if your enamored of these things you had better get a brand new ball and measure it otherwise its self defeating. If your tested on dud house balls forget about it. I have seen a kid in sandals of medium size with a weekenders swing record a 335 yard shot on Foresight at Golfsmith. Sorry, no way he hits it that far on the range, no way Jose. It might have been a 275 yard shot at best. I saw a while back a top level kid 6'6", 26 years old, terrifically fast swing, playing competition golf for many years record a 125mph swing on Foresight. The swing was considerably faster than that imo probably much closer to 138-40.  I think our love of gadgets and data can sometimes get in the way. We want control. We fear not being in control. To accurately measure distannce and launch and ball spin and accuracy all I need is two eyes and the range and some decent range balls within 5-10% of max flight. And these devices make a lot of money for the stores, draw in customers and create an unnecessary hierarchy between techies and players.

no Way anyone could hit it 335 wearing sandals of medium size ;)

Wouldn't beat up balls likely underestimate distance? I am going to try to hit balls on a track man this weekend and thought about whether I should hit my own balls. The difference probably isn't very much, though.

What if the sandals were large? Or medium large?
I know my river sandals would be fine for golf. They have Vibram soles.

In fact, that gives me an idea. . .
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

You can "normalize" ball flight too, even if you're hitting limited distance balls. TrackMan and FlightScopes will report the "regular ball distance" then.

 

I don't think TM/FS are less accurate than someone's eyes… @buddhabob. I can't speak for the ForeSight. It's a camera based system that relies on (I think) proper placement of stickers, etc.

 

 

Good to know, thanks.  I'll see if I can do that.

 

After getting new clubs last year and making a lot of changes to my swing, I am not as confident in my distances as I would like to be.  So I hope to hit something like 10 balls with every club, maybe even full swing, 3/4, 1/2, etc., and walk out knowing my distances.    

 

The place near me is some sort of fitness/lessons/indoor practice facility.  They've got 2 track mans, a bunch of hitting bays equipped with cameras, a big putting green and bunkers.  They charge $50 for a one day pass.  Too much to use on a weekly basis, but ok to try every now and then.  I think their bread and butter is memberships that include instruction, fitness, and practice.    

post #43 of 59

Since I've never actually gotten an accurate distance of how far each one of my clubs are hitting, I'm using Trackman today to figure it out. Is this a good idea? Bad idea? Based on this thread I'd say it will be very accurate. Any suggestions? Like say...take the average of 10 shots. Or take the average of the shots that felt the best? 

post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post
 

Since I've never actually gotten an accurate distance of how far each one of my clubs are hitting, I'm using Trackman today to figure it out. Is this a good idea? Bad idea? Based on this thread I'd say it will be very accurate. Any suggestions? Like say...take the average of 10 shots. Or take the average of the shots that felt the best? 

 

That's what I do, I think its worthwhile.  I delete the crappy shots.  If I hit a club 150 yards on the nose 9 times and 30 yards 1 time, I wouldn't consider that my 138 club.

post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post
 

 

That's what I do, I think its worthwhile.

Should I bring my own golf balls? I'm primarily using the same all year. 

post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post
 

Should I bring my own golf balls? I'm primarily using the same all year. 

 

I probably wouldn't, but you can.  Like iacas said above, trackman can normalize the flight.  And I doubt it makes a big difference.

post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post
 

 

I probably wouldn't, but you can.  Like iacas said above, trackman can normalize the flight.  And I doubt it makes a big difference.

Sounds good, thanks!

post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post
 

if your enamored of these things you had better get a brand new ball and measure it otherwise its self defeating. If your tested on dud house balls forget about it. I have seen a kid in sandals of medium size with a weekenders swing record a 335 yard shot on Foresight at Golfsmith. Sorry, no way he hits it that far on the range, no way Jose. It might have been a 275 yard shot at best. I saw a while back a top level kid 6'6", 26 years old, terrifically fast swing, playing competition golf for many years record a 125mph swing on Foresight. The swing was considerably faster than that imo probably much closer to 138-40.  I think our love of gadgets and data can sometimes get in the way. We want control. We fear not being in control. To accurately measure distannce and launch and ball spin and accuracy all I need is two eyes and the range and some decent range balls within 5-10% of max flight. And these devices make a lot of money for the stores, draw in customers and create an unnecessary hierarchy between techies and players.

 

Okay, I've found some sandals with replaceable spikes at Dick's Sporting Goods.

 

Might need to get them for my next set of golf shoes.

post #49 of 59

also Trackman measures clubhead speed off the heel of the driver. For many clubheads this will underestimate the speed of the actual swing,me Calloways being the exception. Also Trackman cannot measure how much your clubhead decelerates after contact with the ball. Average deceleration is nearly 20% for an average golfer. Long drivers effort to reduce deceleration down to 5% or so using leverage, strength training and angle of attack. There are many other factors besides swing speed that determin ball speed and distance.

post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post
 

also Trackman measures clubhead speed off the heel of the driver.

 

I don't believe that's accurate. It sees the driver as a "blob" and measures in the middle of the "blob."

post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crim View Post
 

Should I bring my own golf balls? I'm primarily using the same all year. 


I recently attended a seminar, one of the speakers was the inventor of a very popular tour ball, one that we have all played. I will paraphrase what he said "take a Prov1, a noodle, any bridgestone etc, even a 5 year old  pinnacle that has been in a hazard for a couple of months, have them hit by machine ( driver)  and they all go roughly the same distance +/- 3 yards.  The difference from a high Spin ball and a low spin ball off the face of driver is insignificant <2%

 

8 iron on down is a different story and a subject for a different thread.

 

Leave your balls home and embrace trackman, flightscope's data. 

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post
 

Average deceleration is nearly 20% for an average golfer. Long drivers effort to reduce deceleration down to 5% or so using leverage, strength training and angle of attack. There are many other factors besides swing speed that determin ball speed and distance.

 

Why do you think deceleration at the impact, due to hitting the ball, is a bad thing? Where do you think the momentum needed to get ball moving comes from if not from the change in clubhead's momentum?


Edited by luu5 - 5/8/14 at 4:22am
post #53 of 59

its commonsense that the stronger and faster the speed thru impact and well into follow thru the farther the ball will fly. Too many examples to give for this one. Mike Dunaway one of the great original long drivers harps on actually accelerating after the ball is hit. I don't know if this is possible but he claims it is a prime reason for his exceptional power and distance. He could regularly hit 375 with persimmon woods and balata balls.

post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhabob View Post
 

its commonsense that the stronger and faster the speed thru impact and well into follow thru the farther the ball will fly. Too many examples to give for this one. Mike Dunaway one of the great original long drivers harps on actually accelerating after the ball is hit. I don't know if this is possible but he claims it is a prime reason for his exceptional power and distance. He could regularly hit 375 with persimmon woods and balata balls.

 

Of course faster = farther. But still the club head speed will decelerate at the hit. As long as the ball mass > 0 it will happen. 

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