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Shin splints - what to do? - Page 2

post #19 of 34

Re: Shin splints - what to do?

Just try and take it easy for a while, and ice them when they get worse. Be sure to stretch your calves thoroughly before and after your rounds/practice sessions. I had a problem with shin splints a few years ago, I once got a tip that while doing the "push the wall down" calf stretch (not sure what its called) you should angle your feet inwards so they're angled like / \. Seemed to help me. Good luck.
post #20 of 34

Re: Shin splints - what to do?

I get them terrible when I run, but if I run for a couple days they go away. I'd suggest running or jogging a bit, it will help. I think.
post #21 of 34

Re: Shin splints - what to do?

I had the same issue as the OP, shin splint in my left leg only. It was agrivated by wearing golf shoes. I think the spikes on the shoes were really planting my foot and causing extra torque on the shin. When I started wearing my running shoes instead it helped to aleviate the pain for awhile. But I just have been playing way too much to let it rest properly.
post #22 of 34

Re: Shin splints - what to do?

Originally Posted by DavidFehertysBike View Post
You dont want to do that. Piss on that shin!
Now that's an interesting treatment I've never heard of before.
post #23 of 34

Re: Shin splints - what to do?

You need new shoes. End of thread.
post #24 of 34
Thread Starter 

Re: Shin splints - what to do?

Well, with the heat and humidity we've been having for the past few days I took a few days off from golf. I also did some stretching and alternating ice and compression for a few hours each night.

Yesterday I played nine holes with a cart and, lo and behold, no pain at all. Granted, it was only nine holes and no walking involved (and I'm sure the 3 ibuprofen I took beforehand helped as well), but that kind of play would have certainly caused some significan pain two or three weeks ago. I'm looking at it as a positive step forward.

BTW, the stretch that pittpanther suggested really seemed to help.
post #25 of 34

Having shin splint problems too at the moment.  Go see doctor, and he will tell you:

 

- take NSAIDS

- rest

- ice

- stretch

- coat of flexium gel (or stuff like that) on your legs at night, wrapped in plastic foil so the gel has to go into your leg

 

post #26 of 34

From my history, its a combination of poor fitted shoes, and lack of strength in the legs. Firs i would go to a store like, New Balance, or your local runing store and get fitted for shoes. I found out i needed a wide shoe, with one size smaller. I usually compensated for the wide feet for just going up a half a size in the shoes. This was bad for me. This is tough because footjoy is the only shoe to offer wide in a good variety, but it has helped me a ton. My feet don't hurt anymore on the golf course, which was my problem.

post #27 of 34

Typical causes of "shin splints" include a tight gastroc/soleus complex or some sort of anatomical foot issue (flat feet/high arch, etc etc).  I would recommend stretching out your calfs really well, if they get tight, they cause your foot to be pulled into plantarflexion, therefore causing your "shin" muscles to work harder to pull your foot back to neutral.  If you have some sort of arch issue, proper footwear/orthotics is a must as some other posters have said.  Shin splints are annoying but if the pain ever localizes to one sport, then you should be concerned about a stress fx.  Also, after playing golf - icing/ice cup massage may be helpful as well!

post #28 of 34

I really never had any issues with shin splints after i lost alot of my weight. Proper fitted golf shoes help out a ton. I have wide feet, 2E, so once i found this out and got the right golf shoes alot of my foot problems went away. I had arch issues with my feet, my arches would cramp up after a round of golf.

 

If your going to stretch your Calf muscle, i would do some lunges, or get on the leg press machine, push it out, keeping your legs straight, and just push the weight with your calf. Or you can do some calf raises. Never do a static stretch to warm up, it causes injury.

post #29 of 34

i hope this helps, i had shin splints and stress fractures in my shins for the last two years in college (i played baseball, pitcher). i always heated before activity, stretched, and then afterwards went into the trainers for ice. however, at night my trainer told me to use ice massages. get yourself some of those paper dixie cups and fill them almost to the brim with water, and put about 8 of em in your freezer. at night, use something to cut the bottom of the cup off, leaving the ice exposed. rub in a circular motion, up and down your shin wherever it hurts until the ice is gone. do this as often as you like, it will only help.

-PG

post #30 of 34

Well shin splints have to be caused by an inbalance somewere in the leg, thats putting unwanted stress

 

Causes,

Like said before, tight muscles in the lower leg

Overpronation of the foot

Stres Fractures can cause pain similar to shin splints as well..

 

So really these two are treatable, one requires proper shoes, maybe something that can correct for an overpronation. This can also be caused by weak ankle muscles, if they are unstable, you might not be able to walk properly. The first can be treated with heat and ice, and proper warmup before the round. You can also use a tennis ball and massage the calf muscle to loosen it up..

post #31 of 34

An actual chin splint is the muscle pulling away from the bone, at least that is how my doctor explained it to me.

Every spring when I get back into running I fight them.

The only thing that helped was rest.

It got so bad when I would walk normally it would kill me. The only thing that helped me was wrapping my chin/calf pretty snug with a large ace wrap.

I would also put ice packs on/off every night.

 

Some very flat shoes like vibram five fingers,merrels or minimus's have helped recently.

post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunnsetning View Post

An actual chin splint is the muscle pulling away from the bone, at least that is how my doctor explained it to me.

Every spring when I get back into running I fight them.

The only thing that helped was rest.

It got so bad when I would walk normally it would kill me. The only thing that helped me was wrapping my chin/calf pretty snug with a large ace wrap.

I would also put ice packs on/off every night.

 

Some very flat shoes like vibram five fingers,merrels or minimus's have helped recently.

They are shin splints, not chin splints.

Muscles are connected to tendons, not bones.
 

 

post #33 of 34

Being an Athletic Trainer I have dealt with many shin splints and the worst thing is there is not one set standard in treating them.  This is mostly because the etiology of the injury in unknown.  Some say its a weakness of the soleus others say its tight triceps surae.  I have found the best treatment is  IFC electrical stimulation with ice with a pulse rate of 100-150bpm.  Now this is nothing that an average guy would have availible so I suggest trying those calf wraps that runners wear.  Ice before and after or heat.  You won't make the situation worse by mis-treating it.  The only thing to be careful of is that this can result in stress fractures.

 

Hope this helps

post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorty View Post

They are shin splints, not chin splints.

Muscles are connected to tendons, not bones.
 

 



Sorry I had 2 letters wrong in my post.

And I didn't say they were attached directly to the bone as if that was the only method. I said it pulling away from the shin. Which would explain why a wrap helps greatly.

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