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Choosing a New Putter

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi,

Im in the market for a new putter, and was just wondering about a couple things.

First of all, what is the difference between things like insert, milled, cast, etc.

Also, I know that choosing a putter is mostly personal preference, but can you guys give me suggestions on some putters? Im looking for something like the Ping Karsten Anser...

Thanks for the help!
post #2 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Originally Posted by Golfman91 View Post
Hi,

Im in the market for a new putter, and was just wondering about a couple things.

First of all, what is the difference between things like insert, milled, cast, all about which imparts the best feel to youetc.

Also, I know that choosing a putter is mostly personal preference, but can you guys give me suggestions on some putters? Im looking for something like the Ping Karsten Anser...

Thanks for the help!
Why not get a custom fitted Karsten Anser for under $100????
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Re: Choosing a New Putter

I was also thinking about the TaylorMade Core Classic Rossa Daytona..

The putter I have now is big, and I want something smaller like these.

What suggestions do you guys have?

*Thanks, I might get the Karsten custom fitted.
post #4 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Check out the Cleveland Classic Series. Great feel, milled face, no insert. All for about $70 brand new.

I use the CC 1 and love it.
post #5 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Originally Posted by Golfman91 View Post
Hi,

Im in the market for a new putter, and was just wondering about a couple things.

First of all, what is the difference between things like insert, milled, cast, etc.

Also, I know that choosing a putter is mostly personal preference, but can you guys give me suggestions on some putters? Im looking for something like the Ping Karsten Anser...

Thanks for the help!
As you stated, choosing a putter is a personal preference and he best thing you can do is just try as many different models and configurations as possible. However, some things to think about:

Insert vs. no insert - this has become a big personal choice thing for many golfers. Most inserts are a little softer than the metal used in the rest of the putters and will create a different sounds and feel than non-insert putters. Some people believe that distance control is easier with insert putters, but others will dispute that. Personally, I have found insert putters easier to control distance with. They might even cause forward spin a little sooner than non-insert putters, but that depends on several factors. This might be a good place to start with your selection process - decide if you prefer the insert or not. Of course not all inserts are the same so you need to try different models.

As for the question about 'milled', this is often an misunderstood term. This comes from a process post production where the face is machine milled to give it a perfectly flat surface. This is not in regards to the process of making the putter, which is...

Forged vs. cast - This is how the putter is made. Cast is a process where hot steel is poured into a 'cast' to create a shape. This process is often cheaper and most putters on the market are created in this way. Forged is a process of starting with a single piece of metal and shaping that to create the putter. Many people claim that forged putters are superior in feel, sound and quality while others will dispute it. Scotty Cameron putters are forged while Odyssey putters are cast. Most of the difference in sound and feel is more about the material used than the process itself (cast materials are often 'harder' than forged because a softer material is easier to shape in the forging process). Again, try both and see what you prefer.

Face weigting - For the most part their are 2 designs for weighting in the face of putters - heel-toe weighted, heel weighted and face balanced. The biggest difference in these is with your putting stroke. A h-t weighted putter has majority of weight in face in the heel and toe (with different percentage distributions of this weight across different models) as opposed to face balanced which evens the weight across the face. Most believe a heel-toe weighted putter is better for strokes that are inside-square-inside as it helps square the face for this stroke. If your stroke is more square-to-square it's believed that a face-balanced model works best as this helps keep the face square through the stroke. This is another important factor to consider based on you stroke and what feels right to you.

Hosel/shaft configuration - How the hosel connects to the head is a huge factor and one often overlooked. There are so many different designs from the plumbers neck to various shaft bends and offsets. Mostly the important thing is to find one that you like the looks of. For most inside-square-inside strokes a heel shafted model of some variety seems to better fit this stroke, while a center-shafted model often seems a better fit for square-to-square strokes, but it's such a personal thing that no rule really applies. It all comes down to your stroke and what gives you the best results.

Blade vs. Mallet - another big difference and again something that really seperates putters. Mallet putters are usually more forgiving on off-center hits (higher MOI) and may be easier to align because of their design, but many players find they get better 'feel' with blades (partially because of the MOI) and for those with inside-square-inside strokes they often think a blade is easier for this stroke (although lots of people with this stroke use mallets as well). Square-to-square stroke playes sometimes prefer mallets (which are often face balanced).

Other thing to also be aware of, although I will not bore you with too many details:

Length - do not overlook this, make sure you get right length for your stroke and do not adjust to fit putter.

Loft - putter lofts differ by a few degrees and based on your stroke (and the types of greens you play) it can help with smoother roll.

Overall weight - personal choice, but some find heavier putter easier to control while some feel lighter gives better feel.

Grip - larger grips help take hands and wrists out of putt while smaller can give better feel.

Try a lot of different putters with different configurations until you find what you prefer. After years of playing with lots of putters, I have settled (at least for now) on a 35 inch, center-shafted, face-balanced, insert mallet because it fits me best and gives me the most confidence.
post #6 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Originally Posted by NativeTxn View Post
Check out the Cleveland Classic Series. Great feel, milled face, no insert. All for about $70 brand new.

I use the CC 1 and love it.
Demo'd one at my home course a few weeks ago....sweet roll...nice classic clean lines....ridiculously good value.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Originally Posted by PiKapp23 View Post
As you stated, choosing a putter is a personal preference and he best thing you can do is just try as many different models and configurations as possible. However, some things to think about:

Insert vs. no insert - this has become a big personal choice thing for many golfers. Most inserts are a little softer than the metal used in the rest of the putters and will create a different sounds and feel than non-insert putters. Some people believe that distance control is easier with insert putters, but others will dispute that. Personally, I have found insert putters easier to control distance with. They might even cause forward spin a little sooner than non-insert putters, but that depends on several factors. This might be a good place to start with your selection process - decide if you prefer the insert or not. Of course not all inserts are the same so you need to try different models.

As for the question about 'milled', this is often an misunderstood term. This comes from a process post production where the face is machine milled to give it a perfectly flat surface. This is not in regards to the process of making the putter, which is...

Forged vs. cast - This is how the putter is made. Cast is a process where hot steel is poured into a 'cast' to create a shape. This process is often cheaper and most putters on the market are created in this way. Forged is a process of starting with a single piece of metal and shaping that to create the putter. Many people claim that forged putters are superior in feel, sound and quality while others will dispute it. Scotty Cameron putters are forged while Odyssey putters are cast. Most of the difference in sound and feel is more about the material used than the process itself (cast materials are often 'harder' than forged because a softer material is easier to shape in the forging process). Again, try both and see what you prefer.

Face weigting - For the most part their are 2 designs for weighting in the face of putters - heel-toe weighted, heel weighted and face balanced. The biggest difference in these is with your putting stroke. A h-t weighted putter has majority of weight in face in the heel and toe (with different percentage distributions of this weight across different models) as opposed to face balanced which evens the weight across the face. Most believe a heel-toe weighted putter is better for strokes that are inside-square-inside as it helps square the face for this stroke. If your stroke is more square-to-square it's believed that a face-balanced model works best as this helps keep the face square through the stroke. This is another important factor to consider based on you stroke and what feels right to you.

Hosel/shaft configuration - How the hosel connects to the head is a huge factor and one often overlooked. There are so many different designs from the plumbers neck to various shaft bends and offsets. Mostly the important thing is to find one that you like the looks of. For most inside-square-inside strokes a heel shafted model of some variety seems to better fit this stroke, while a center-shafted model often seems a better fit for square-to-square strokes, but it's such a personal thing that no rule really applies. It all comes down to your stroke and what gives you the best results.

Blade vs. Mallet - another big difference and again something that really seperates putters. Mallet putters are usually more forgiving on off-center hits (higher MOI) and may be easier to align because of their design, but many players find they get better 'feel' with blades (partially because of the MOI) and for those with inside-square-inside strokes they often think a blade is easier for this stroke (although lots of people with this stroke use mallets as well). Square-to-square stroke playes sometimes prefer mallets (which are often face balanced).

Other thing to also be aware of, although I will not bore you with too many details:

Length - do not overlook this, make sure you get right length for your stroke and do not adjust to fit putter.

Loft - putter lofts differ by a few degrees and based on your stroke (and the types of greens you play) it can help with smoother roll.

Overall weight - personal choice, but some find heavier putter easier to control while some feel lighter gives better feel.

Grip - larger grips help take hands and wrists out of putt while smaller can give better feel.

Try a lot of different putters with different configurations until you find what you prefer. After years of playing with lots of putters, I have settled (at least for now) on a 35 inch, center-shafted, face-balanced, insert mallet because it fits me best and gives me the most confidence.
Wow! Thanks so much PiKapp23, it has helped a lot.

Now, I think I'm going to go with the Taylormade Rossa Core Classic Daytona Putter. Although I will look at the other ones you guys have mentioned.

Thanks everyone!
post #8 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

I just bought the Never Compromise gm2 exchange putter and I love it,but its all personal preference...
post #9 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Try out a Rife Antigua. It's my wand of choice. Last time out was my best ever putting round (34), on my way to an 84 overall (great for me) after only my 7th round with it. This included a 35 foot uphill putt for birdie at the eighteenth (in front of a gallery). Died straight into the middle of the hole. I never make those....but what more impressed me was just how good all of my putts were for length. The Rife really gets the ball rolling beautifully.

You'd have to prise it out of my cold dead hands, and all that....

....get the right length and you can adjust it for lie, it has a milled face and reduced loft that gets the ball rolling without hopping, and is based on the classic Anser shape. It's a beautiful putter, finished with a nice grip. Still it's all about what suits you. Try one.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Sounds Good - Im heading to the Golf Store either today or tomorrow to try some putters out, including the ones you have mentioned, and will give more information after im back. thanks guys!

If there is any more suggestions, id be happy to hear them! :)
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

Re: Choosing a New Putter

*Also, do you guys know what the head cover looks like for the Rossa Core Classic Daytona?

If you can, could you post a picture or something? Thanks!
post #12 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Hard to imagine anything in golf with wider variation in personal preference than putters and putting. From the standpoint of technical analysis, a good putter should be heavy (emphasizes the larger muscles), wide (low moment of inertia), and have some type of aiming alignment built in. Beyond that, you'll get as many opinions as there are golfers. Ignore all of it.
post #13 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

i have the ping karsten and i like it alot. its all about feel you should go to your local course because the putting greens in dicks sporting goods arent good enought and hit probably 20 putter slowly eliminating putters you dont like then when you have 2 putters left come back another day and try those two
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Just got back, and I really like the following:

Cleveland Classic Putters
-Really good price
-I like the classic look and feel of it.

Taylormade Core Classic Daytona
-The look of this putter is one of my favorites I have seen.

Odyssey Black Series i #1
-Best feeling and weighted putter of the three
-Probably my favorite putter.
-Only thing is that it is very expensive. Although it is on sale here at the local shop, and I have a gift card, so that has lowered the price..

What do you guys think?
post #15 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Originally Posted by Golfman91 View Post
Just got back, and I really like the following:

Cleveland Classic Putters
-Really good price
-I like the classic look and feel of it.

Taylormade Core Classic Daytona
-The look of this putter is one of my favorites I have seen.

Odyssey Black Series i #1
-Best feeling and weighted putter of the three
-Probably my favorite putter.
-Only thing is that it is very expensive. Although it is on sale here at the local shop, and I have a gift card, so that has lowered the price..

What do you guys think?
it you have a good putting stroke i would go with the cleveland but if you want the most consistant putter get the #1. i have that putter aswell and it is most cosistent putter i have hit because of the back weight.
post #16 of 16

Re: Choosing a New Putter

Hard to find a better all-around deal than the Cleveland, IMO (but only if it works for you, of course).
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