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Should a test be required before playing public course? - Page 11

Poll Results: Should there be a test before you can play golf?

 
  • 9% (17)
    Yes. Basic rules & etiquette test + ability test (score under 120)
  • 19% (34)
    basic rules + etiquette test would be nice...
  • 51% (89)
    Not a test, but a booklet hand-out with the basics should do
  • 19% (33)
    no way, even if course and our enjoyment suffers...
173 Total Votes  
post #181 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post
 

 

I get that it isn't a million dollars, but just going on your figures, an average person is looking to TRY golf at about $350 just to get started. That's a lot of money for a lot of people. That's a car payment. That's the monthly grocey bill (with coupons). It's well more than a month of utilities. I'm not suggesting that golf should be "free." Nothing is free, and everyone has to prioritize their recreation and entertainment.

 

The beauty of golf, to me, is that anyone can do it. You don't play against anyone but yourself and the course. And no matter how new or bad you are at it, you can always aim to be one stroke better than the last time. You can enjoy the triumph of hitting your drives just a little bit longer than you did last time. You can be proud you finished a round 20 minutes quicker than before. There are a thousand ways to recognize your improvement, and be encouraged by it. That means there are a thousand reasons to keep coming back. But before that, you have to GET STARTED. And if getting started is prohibitively expensive, less people will do it. Adding a test just to let you in will discourage even more.

 

I'm not denying there are start up costs, but as @iacas stated, almost every recreation has some start up cost.  I played racquetball for many years, which require racquets, balls, eye protection, gym membership plus court fees.

 

Before you even worry about some of these costs, you have to determine if you even like golf before you make the investment.  In many cases you can buy a demo 6i for less than $20 which is more than enough to get started working on a swing at the range.  For my first few lessons, I didn't swing anything but a 7i so it's not like you'll be disadvantaged only having one club.  You can rent clubs, but you can also find them very cheap if you search on eBay, globalgolf, 3balls or other used equipment sites.  Some of the best deals I've heard of, came from yard sales and playitagain sports, if you have one in your area and especially if you're right handed.

 

You don't have to play Pro V1 balls at $45 / dozen, you can purchase pre-owned balls from lostgolfballs.com or other sites where you can get decent beginner golf balls at less than $0.25 a ball.

 

I think you are placing a lot of false barriers up to make your point, but I'd really hate to see people reading this thread to be discouraged to take up golf because of this prevailing myth that golf is too expensive for anyone but the wealthy.

post #182 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post
 

Going back to that "elite" status would hurt golf. I think a much better approach would be for courses to be proactive in recruiting new players and doing so with instruction provided. A nice little package that includes 9 holes, instruction on etiquette, how to repair a ball mark or divot, pace of play, etc. We've discussed many times in other threads that golf is a little too expensive for many people. It seems to me that requiring a test to play means I first also need to go take lessons from a pro. How else can I learn all this stuff? And that's yet another thing that is pricing me out before I even begin.

I'm not specifically directing this at you, but in general, what does that it's another thing that is pricing you out?  I get that's it's cool to beat up on the 1%'ers and their lifestyle, but I constantly hear about the "high cost" of golf but I think that is more perception than reality or a lack of information.

 

If you want to buy the latest and greatest clubs, dress to the nines and belong to a private country club then yes, it's going to be expensive.  If you're willing to start off a bit more modestly you can;

  • Borrow or buy pre-owned clubs or box set, cost - $0 - $200
  • If you play public or muni, regular summer clothes are usually approved, shorts, t-shirt or collared shirt, $0
  • Play public or muni courses off peak hours, use a service like golfnow, or play 9 holes, cost $15 - $35 per round
  • Buy a cheap pair of golf shoes or wear sneakers, cost $0 - $50
  • Range balls - $10 - $15 for 120 balls
  • Get lessons from Evolvr - $40 setup includes 1st month, $39 per month after

 

If you borrow the clubs or get them at a garage sale you're looking at a minimal investment to get started.  With the cost of a round between at $15 - $35, (which is less than most spend at happy hour or on one dinner) we're not talking lifestyles of the rich and famous.

 

I've seen entire sets with bag go for $10 at a garage sale.  They usually have to be regripped, but get the Tour Velvet (my preferred grip) or similar and it's not a big investment.  It's not that hard to get equipped if a person really wants to.

post #183 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post


If you say so.

What's that supposed to mean, exactly? I mean, if you want to call me a liar then step up and say the word.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

 

I'm not denying there are start up costs, but as @iacas stated, almost every recreation has some start up cost.  I played racquetball for many years, which require racquets, balls, eye protection, gym membership plus court fees.

 

Before you even worry about some of these costs, you have to determine if you even like golf before you make the investment.  In many cases you can buy a demo 6i for less than $20 which is more than enough to get started working on a swing at the range.  For my first few lessons, I didn't swing anything but a 7i so it's not like you'll be disadvantaged only having one club.  You can rent clubs, but you can also find them very cheap if you search on eBay, globalgolf, 3balls or other used equipment sites.  Some of the best deals I've heard of, came from yard sales and playitagain sports, if you have one in your area and especially if you're right handed.

 

You don't have to play Pro V1 balls at $45 / dozen, you can purchase pre-owned balls from lostgolfballs.com or other sites where you can get decent beginner golf balls at less than $0.25 a ball.

 

I think you are placing a lot of false barriers up to make your point, but I'd really hate to see people reading this thread to be discouraged to take up golf because of this prevailing myth that golf is too expensive for anyone but the wealthy.

 

This is what I'm talking about. And I apologize if my remarks have led us on a tangent, so let me see if I can bring this back around to the original question to put what I'm saying in better context. Of course all recreation has costs, some more than others, and I think you'd agree that golf is a more costly recreation than many other things people can do. So your statement in bold above is very important. My question is, how can one determine if they like golf if they have to demonstrate an arbitrary level of proficiency before being allowed to play a course? Where do they acquire this proficiency? Who signs off on it? Are we talking about lessons? We can argue the start-up costs of playing golf, but I don't see the value in adding yet another cost to getting started. I don't see how that encourages more people to take up the game. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

I've seen entire sets with bag go for $10 at a garage sale.  They usually have to be regripped, but get the Tour Velvet (my preferred grip) or similar and it's not a big investment.  It's not that hard to get equipped if a person really wants to.

 

No doubt, especially depending on where you live, a person can get equipped at a reasonable cost with used clubs and whatnot. And that's a good thing. So let's not put up a barrier that would discourage someone from taking advantage of it. 

post #184 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post

What's that supposed to mean, exactly? I mean, if you want to call me a liar then step up and say the word.

It means I don't put a lot of faith in anyone's experiences, particularly when they're not my own.

There are 25 million golfers or so in the U.S. That you don't happen to know very many doesn't say much of anything.
post #185 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post


It means I don't put a lot of faith in anyone's experiences, particularly when they're not my own.

There are 25 million golfers or so in the U.S. That you don't happen to know very many doesn't say much of anything.

 

Oh, so you're a cynic. Fair enough. We all have our ways. 

 

I was simply responding to your notion that it's easy and common to borrow up clubs from friends and relations, but what is true for some is not true for all. But I have to confess that I lied, not on purpose. I just remembered that I do have a cousin-in-law who plays golf a lot. He's a dentist. The other guy I was talking about is my bank president. Yay, stereotypes! Point is, in this lonely outpost of North Alabama, we common rednecks are more likely to be cow tipping than ball chipping. 

post #186 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post

Oh, so you're a cynic. Fair enough. We all have our ways. 


Nope. I just don't think one person's personal experiences carry much weight.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post

I was simply responding to your notion that it's easy and common to borrow up clubs from friends and relations.

 

Yes, again, with nothing but personal experiences.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post

I was simply responding to your notion that it's easy and common to borrow up clubs from friends and relations, but what is true for some is not true for all. But I have to confess that I lied, not on purpose. I just remembered that I do have a cousin-in-law who plays golf a lot. He's a dentist. The other guy I was talking about is my bank president. Yay, stereotypes!

 

Golf was expensive in the 1990s. And early 2000s. And even the 1960s, 70s, 80s, etc. Yet people still took up the game and played it. They found a way, even when there were not 25 million golfers to help introduce someone to the game, loan them some starter clubs or give them some old golf magazines, etc.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post

Point is, in this lonely outpost of North Alabama, we common rednecks are more likely to be cow tipping than ball chipping.

 

Better get to it then.

post #187 of 188

I would never tip a cow. They are fine people.

post #188 of 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie Dawn View Post
My question is, how can one determine if they like golf if they have to demonstrate an arbitrary level of proficiency before being allowed to play a course? Where do they acquire this proficiency?

There are 2 normal ways to see if you want to start playing golf here in Sweden, where we got this test system.

 

1. You borrow a club or two and go to the range and see if you like it. I would say that most people will know if they like it or not after this.

 

2. You borrow a set, couple or a single club and go play on one of the courses that doesn't require a green card. There aren't super many of them, but enough for it to be a viable option for most people.

 

Both are the same options you got in the US.

 

I can think of more ways to do it but these two are the best.

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