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GPS vs Laser Range finder - Page 7

post #109 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Sonocaddie does not require a subscription. Just pay for the hand held device and all course downloads are free. I love mine.

Originally Posted by flap View Post
My tax dollars paid to put the damn satelites in orbit and now they want me to rent them from Sky Golf?I DON"T THINK SO,It is a scam.My son is in the Navy and on Subs for the last 15 years and he tells me that if you buy the software the satelites are free.We should not pay twice for the damn things.And that is the biggest reason I own a bushnell laser,
post #110 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by flap View Post
My tax dollars paid to put the damn satelites in orbit and now they want me to rent them from Sky Golf?I DON"T THINK SO,It is a scam.My son is in the Navy and on Subs for the last 15 years and he tells me that if you buy the software the satelites are free.We should not pay twice for the damn things.And that is the biggest reason I own a bushnell laser,
yeah... my igolf doesn't charge a subscription to "use" the satellites... you only pay if you want to download courses that they mapped, and that is because they physically have to go out and walk the course. After your subscription expires you can still use all the sats and all 100 courses you downloaded.
post #111 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I just used my Garmin GPSMAP. Yea, I had to mark the holes and such, but the big thing for me is knowing the distance to the center of the green.......once I get better I might worry about front/middle/back........
post #112 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I have a Callaway LR 550 laser rangefinder by Nikon. I have used it three times and I really like it. It gives accurate distances in an instant. Most importantly, it has built in image stabilization like video cameras. If you hold down on the button it will scan the distance to various objects for 8 seconds. It has automatic shut off, so you can point and shoot, get distance and put it down without worrying about turning it off. It is waterproof as well. There is not much in the way of reviews online since it is new this year. I was considering the Bushnell Y2 tour, but I did not like the fact that it did not have image stabilization, was not waterproof, and did not have a scan feature. Does anyone have any knowledge of the Callaway rangefinder?
post #113 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I tried the GolfBuddy from Golfgalaxy. It worked great for 3 holes and then the screen froze. I had to power it down and power it on again. This happened two more times so I gave up on it. It took some time to aquire the satellites. I like the idea of GPS but basically, they are computers, therefore I purchased a Callaway LR550 rangefinder. It is quick, acurate, and simple.
post #114 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I agree with you. I tried the GolfBuddy and it kept freezing up. I now have the Callaway LR 550 and it is quick and accurate and simple to use.
post #115 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I have both the Sonocaddie XV2 and the Bushnell Tour V2, and as mentioned previously, each has its own merits.



Some Observations Based on My Own Usage:
  • The rangefinder is slightly more precise when compared to a GPS unit that has been accurately mapped.
  • The rangefinder is more versatile for pinpointing targets "on the go" (e.g., that tree over there, that bunker up there, that hot chick in the short skort back there, etc)
  • The rangefinder is more convenient in the sense that you never have to worry about having a specific course downloaded.
  • The rangefinder is more convenient in the sense that it is "point and shoot" - no learning curve, no menus, no multiple buttons.
  • The GPS is more convenient in the sense that it can be clipped to your belt and viewed without unzipping your bag, aiming, shooting, etc.
  • The GPS is more convenient in that you can view the distance to multiple targets at a glance (assuming your GPS has that capability)
  • The GPS can measure the distance of your shot (assuming your GPS has that capability)
  • The GPS does not require a line-of-site.
  • The rangefinder does require a steady hand, but the new vertical models are easier to stabilize, and with Pinseeker (Bushnell)/PinHunter(Leupold)/First Target Priority (Nikon/Callaway), you can get an accurate reading even though the crosshairs are shaking (which they will be).
  • The GPS does occasionally give incorrect readings.
  • The GPS does not always have the courses mapped.
  • Mapping with the Sonocaddie is a fairly simple process, but it does add time to your round and it does "take you out of your game."
  • I have never had any problems with the downloading process for the Sonocaddie.
post #116 of 197

GPS or Laser Range finder?

I have been contemplating picking up either a SkyCaddy or Bushnell Range finder. With the SkyCaddys, do you have to pay a yearly "subscription"? I was leaning towards a range finder, because I am really only concerned with getting accurate yardage, and would like being able to see how consistent my distance is off the tee without guessing or relying on miss-markings. Any info or opinions are appreciated.
post #117 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

I bought a Bushnell at the start of this year and haven't been disappointed. I'm just looking for yardages from this off centre spots and it works just fine.
post #118 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

Originally Posted by CoolBreeze20 View Post
I have been contemplating picking up either a SkyCaddy or Bushnell Range finder. With the SkyCaddys, do you have to pay a yearly "subscription"? I was leaning towards a range finder, because I am really only concerned with getting accurate yardage, and would like being able to see how consistent my distance is off the tee without guessing or relying on miss-markings. Any info or opinions are appreciated.
If you do a search on this topic, you'll come up a ton of threads, especially on the different models of GPS units. And, if you ask this question to 100 people (on which one you'll get) it would run 50-50.

I can only offer you my opinions. I've played with both. Both have advantages, both have disadvantages...it all boils down to personal preference.

Myself, I went the GPS route (SkyCaddie). As a 12 handicap, 1-2 yards difference (if it happens to be inaccurate) isn't going to make a bit of difference to me. The SkyCaddie does require a yearly subscription, and they have (going from memory) three different options: home region, nationwide and world wide. I opted for the nationwide because with vacations, golf trips, etc I play a lot of different places. I'd have to dig out the paperwork but I believe my National plan was $49.95 or there abouts; basically the cost of a box of premium balls.

I've played with a lot of guys who have range finders, including one just last week on vacation. I can't tell you how many times he said "I can't get a reading on it" or it would lock onto the wrong thing and read 437 yards when he was about 135 out. It was picking up a tree or something. Or, if it was a blind shot, he couldn't get a reading of the flag. With my SkyCaddie, I walk up to my ball, glance down and immediately know front/middle/back yardage and go from there (after looking to see where the pin is).

I've only come across one course that wasn't professionally mapped, but even it had been submitted to SkyCaddie. Yardage was accurate on the "one star" reading (all SkyCaddie courses are listed by a ranking system, with 4 stars being professionally mapped). Yardage was right on that course but it didn't list bunkers/etc. Didn't bother me a bit.

Like I said, it's going to come down to personal preference. If you decide range finder, doubt you'll get much argument in going with Bushnell. If you choose the GPS route, you'll get a lot of difference in opinions on SkyCaddie, GolfLogix, uPro, etc. Search the forums for many threads on that.

Good luck.....
post #119 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

Thanks for the responses guys (and sorry for adding to the thread clutter, IACAS). I think I am leaning toward a range finder, so I can know distances to bunkers, bends, etc. I dont expect either one to work perfectly all the time.
post #120 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

I have used both and really like the GPS because you know the front and back distances on the green as well. GPS is pretty handy
post #121 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

GPS is obviously easier to use and is pretty user friendly... especially if you take a cart but then you have to worry about the local courses mapped around you.

I like a rangefinder because it lets you zap objects in the fairway to determine when a dog turn kicks in and what not. If its windy you'll need a pretty sturdy hand to keep focused on the flag/stick

I wish they made the bushnell rangefinder with a lithium battery, 9 volts are not cheap
post #122 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

Originally Posted by seanYsean View Post
I have used both and really like the GPS because you know the front and back distances on the green as well. GPS is pretty handy
I use the Golflogix. . .I was also contemplating a laser range finder before I bought this. It seems quicker. . .heck, its just hanging there and I look at it, one click of a button to find the distance to the bunker, etc., etc. Range finder has to be taken out, aimed, etc. etc.

GPS just seems more practical for me.
post #123 of 197

Re: GPS or Laser Range finder?

I was a chip & a putt away from buying a laser finder...then someone on the forum said that it isn't legal in play with tournaments if it had slope. that was the only reason that i would've went range finder over gps so you can get a truly accurate distance. But my gf got me the sonocaddie for my birthday this year and it's AWESOME!
post #124 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by CoolBreeze20 View Post
Thanks for the responses guys (and sorry for adding to the thread clutter, IACAS). I think I am leaning toward a range finder, so I can know distances to bunkers, bends, etc. I dont expect either one to work perfectly all the time.
No problem - Harry posted the URL, so I was able to quickly merge your "clutter" thread into a previous one.

Originally Posted by DJYoshi View Post
I was a chip & a putt away from buying a laser finder...then someone on the forum said that it isn't legal in play with tournaments if it had slope. that was the only reason that i would've went range finder over gps so you can get a truly accurate distance. But my gf got me the sonocaddie for my birthday this year and it's AWESOME!
The slope function has nothing to do with getting a "truly accurate distance." I'm not sure what you mean by that. The range finders without slope (in addition to costing less) still give you the same yardage. They just don't guess at what the yardage will "play like."
post #125 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Got my 1500 w slope and I love it
post #126 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by joa View Post
Got my 1500 w slope and I love it
Are you not good enough that you ever foresee yourself playing in any sort of tournament (or rich enough that you can afford the non-slope version when that time comes)?
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