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GPS vs Laser Range finder - Page 9

post #145 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

xiphos-

I have the same problem with my rangefinder but from what I hear, the newer models are easier to keep steady, even in the wind. Still, I went with the GPS.
post #146 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

a rangefinder is decent, but I find they are very cumbersome...I have the sky caddie sg5 and find that that works best
post #147 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

For the first time I played a course that had the laser reflectors on the flagsticks. What a nice feature that is!! You can literally never miss a reading on the pin. And this course had large enough greens that my buddy's GPS was half guesswork. For an uphill shot where all you knew was front middle or back and couldn't see the green surface, the GPS could be off by 5 or 6 yards.... easily enough to miss the green long, short, or leave yourself in 3 putt range.

Both are good, useful tools, but I'm happy with my Pinseeker Tour V2 rangefinder.
post #148 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
Both are good, useful tools, but I'm happy with my Pinseeker Tour V2 rangefinder.
My choice as well these days.
post #149 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
For the first time I played a course that had the laser reflectors on the flagsticks. What a nice feature that is!! You can literally never miss a reading on the pin. And this course had large enough greens that my buddy's GPS was half guesswork. For an uphill shot where all you knew was front middle or back and couldn't see the green surface, the GPS could be off by 5 or 6 yards.... easily enough to miss the green long, short, or leave yourself in 3 putt range.

Both are good, useful tools, but I'm happy with my Pinseeker Tour V2 rangefinder.
I have never heard of having laser reflectors on the flags. That would solve the biggest problem for those things.

Thats so kool!
post #150 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I'll add my (over-priced) two-cents worth here.

I have owned both a GPS and laser rangefinder devices. I ultimately ended up a laser user because the GPS is basically at its worst in the situations where I need accurate information the most (accurate yardages TO THE PIN inside 100 yards - sometimes well under 100 yards).

GPS devices don't (on the courses I play) know the pin and their accuracy drops as the distances start approaching (or dropping under) 50 yards. I practice my partial wedges alot and this is very important to me.

I also once did an accuracy experiment. I did not actually evaluate absolute accuracy, but I did evaluate the repeatability of a measurement. I just walked around the neighborhood and marked four distances (N-S-E-W of my front yard) in the 100-250 yard range. Then over a period of a couple weeks I did measurements from a fixed point in my driveway to these four points and recorded them.


In this data I found that my measurements were within +-3 yards 91% of the time, within +-4 yards 97% of the time, and within +-5 yards 99% of the time. I can see a number of ways that the on course measurements would be worse, but I can't imagine how they might be better. 5 yards is fine from 175 - from 60 yards it is barely OK (barely - leaves me wishing it were better, particularly when you are dealing with a pitch shot over sand to a tight pin, etc).

I also found GPS to be somewhat inconvenient. You put the device in your pocket, lose the signal, and maybe it comes back real quick or (not that often I'll admit) maybe not. Park under a heavy tree canopy - same thing.

Then there is the whole battery management issue. My laser rangefinder will run close to a year on its camera battery. I absolutely HAD to recharge my GPS batteries every other round, but the truth is that it was every round because two rounds was the very limit of the rechargeable AA's. A real pin in the butt from my perspective.

And finally there is the driving range issue. I can get accurate yardages to basically any driving range target anywhere/anytime. This is probably my #2 requirement after accurate yardages inside 100 yards on the course and again GPS comes in a very poor second (not even in the race typically).

For me it isn't even a close decision.

dave
post #151 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
I also found GPS to be somewhat inconvenient. You put the device in your pocket, lose the signal, and maybe it comes back real quick or (not that often I'll admit) maybe not. Park under a heavy tree canopy - same thing.
Not trying to change your mind or anything, but you put it in your pocket? The directions on mine specifically say not to carry it in your pocket. It has a belt clip. I used mine for the first time Saturday and under clouds and rain all day I never lost signal.
post #152 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by Smallville View Post
Not trying to change your mind or anything, but you put it in your pocket? The directions on mine specifically say not to carry it in your pocket. It has a belt clip. I used mine for the first time Saturday and under clouds and rain all day I never lost signal.
And now for a Paul Harvey (the rest of the story).

My GPS had a belt clip but it was notoriously flimsey and I didn't trust it. I don't recall my instructions warning about carrying it in your pocket, but that was a problem regardless.

The right answer was probably to buy a small (not that expensive) leather case that they sold as an option with the unit. But I also found that just putting the thing on your "inside side" (right side if you are the cart driver, left if passenger) was enough to increase the probability of a loss of signal in poor conditions (heavy clouds, tree canopy, etc).

By this time I had borrowed a friend's laser for a round, and for me there was no turning back.

dave
post #153 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I use both. A Pinseeker 1500 TE and a GolfLogix8. I use the GPS to track my last shot, and for yardages outside of 150 yards. I use the RF for yardages inside of 150 yards or from the short par 3's. My play isn't the best, but, atleast it helps me take some of the guesswork out of the equation and just concentrate on the shot.
post #154 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I was a firm rangefinder faithfull but the more I walk courses the more I like a GPS. Just the inconvenience of having to pull it out of the bag and have to scope the distance really makes it so I don't always use it.

If I am carting it that is one thing, you can just have it with you in the cart and scope it when you get to your ball but not as convenient when you are walking.

I am looking to get intelligolf for my blackberry, heck I have it with me on the course I might as well put it to good use :)
post #155 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

One last comment from me on laser vs. GPS. My very first laser experience was with a VERY old Nikon unit (built in the 1990's). Getting a yardage with that thing was very difficult, even from 150 yards.

I would probably be a GPS guy right now if the current units were that difficult to use. My current rangefinder (laser) of choice is the Nikon 500G (no longer in production from my understanding) which is WAY easier to use and quite small so it fits in my pocket.

dave
post #156 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Dude...why not just eyeball it? I mean that's how the old school greats did it right? I really mean no offense, but if it was good enough for Jack...

I guess I am just a purest, but you don't get my kind of handicap using some fancy technology...you have to EARN it!!!

PS, I really am not a 36 handicap I just put that there for the fun of it. I really never calculated my handicap cause I really never cared. I just like to play.
post #157 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I use a shooters rangefinder by Bushnell. Works fine and I can get a read from the flag from the tee. I don't need the distance to the front or the back or the middle. Just the flag baby, just the flag. The satellite you are communicating with is 27 000 miles away and how do you know that the guys who walked the course were not in hurry. I am always within 2-3 yards of the GPS guys and I can take my Bushnell to the shooting range. I cannot take my GPS there.
post #158 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by par3forme View Post
Dude...why not just eyeball it? I mean that's how the old school greats did it right? I really mean no offense, but if it was good enough for Jack...

I guess I am just a purest, but you don't get my kind of handicap using some fancy technology...you have to EARN it!!!

PS, I really am not a 36 handicap I just put that there for the fun of it. I really never calculated my handicap cause I really never cared. I just like to play.
Jack didn't "eyeball it". He was the first (at least the first publicized) to make and use a detailed yardage book for each course he played. I can guarantee that if rangefinders were available to him, his caddy would have been walking the course with one instead of just pacing off the distances to make up that yardage book. The pros haven't "eyeballed" it for 40 years.
post #159 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

I do know one of GPS' main advantages is it's hands off. I think it's a great substitute for a hungover disheveled caddy who expects a tip for "helping" with the green reads and carrying the bag . But seriously, on approach shots what I sometimes do is eyeball what I think the distance is. I than mentally select the club and then look at the GPS. If I am anything consistent it is I am eyeballing things short and more often will adjust to the GPS reading. 21st century technology for helping with distance gauging is worth it IMO, whether it's GPS, Laser or both. Don't discount it any more than the technology that is present in the clubs, balls and other golf equipment.
post #160 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
Jack didn't "eyeball it". He was the first (at least the first publicized) to make and use a detailed yardage book for each course he played. I can guarantee that if rangefinders were available to him, his caddy would have been walking the course with one instead of just pacing off the distances to make up that yardage book. The pros haven't "eyeballed" it for 40 years.
right on pointing out the flaws in that whole purest line of thought... and just to add to it...

caddies would walk courses and know yardages long before Jack... go back far enough and pros just used course caddies instead of their own... why, because the caddies knew the yardages best at their own course.
post #161 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

par2forme,

I know your saying this lighthearted but I'm not sure what "purist" means in golf. Technology abounds in all pieces of equipment today. What is the historical time period for being a purist? 20 yrs, 40 yrs, 100 yrs? Does a purist play with just goose feather balls? A purist in golf to me is someone that just loves golf and play by the rules. Nothing more, nothing less.

Back to the topic, I had the opportunity try both GPS and Laser recently. As stated they both have their adv/dis. It all boils down to personal preference and what you want it to do.
post #162 of 197

Re: GPS vs Rangefinder

Originally Posted by par3forme View Post
Dude...why not just eyeball it? I mean that's how the old school greats did it right? I really mean no offense, but if it was good enough for Jack...

I guess I am just a purest, but you don't get my kind of handicap using some fancy technology...you have to EARN it!!!

PS, I really am not a 36 handicap I just put that there for the fun of it. I really never calculated my handicap cause I really never cared. I just like to play.

I assume you are playing with hickory shafts? Technology in equipment progresses the game.
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