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GPS vs Laser Range finder - Page 11

post #181 of 197
I have and use both. I use the sky caddie SG4 for distance and carry distances. Is works well off the tee and on approach shots. On par 3s i like to use my Callaway/Nikon laser for distance to the pin. I know it sounds dumb to have both but the are strapped to my bag and are just as easy to grab. Seems to work well for me since I get the best of both worlds
post #182 of 197

Both are great. I would use both if I could, because some GPS can give you great maps and distances from above, which helps off the tee. I'm convinced this saves me money, because if I'm at a new course, and I can't see the fairway, I gotta guess where to hit it. Only after a round or two would I be able to successfully maneuver tricky tee shots like that, but with a GPS device, I can hit it right the first time and really enjoy my first round. Laser rangefinders are also awesome. I can aim off of any object and get good readings, but I usually only use it to help me in critical situations, or to confirm the distance markers of the course. The only drawback for me and lasers is if I know the distance to the pin, but I can't see the green well, I might go for a pin distance and not know the safe, fat area of the green to work with. Coupled with a pin-placement of the day sheet, it would be perfect, but I don't always see those at courses.

post #183 of 197

I've played with the Skycaddie as well as the Neo+...but recently purchased the Callaway Laser (Nikon). By far the laser is more convenient for me and very simple to use. As others have indicated, shooting the flag or other reflective objects from 250 yards in isn't a big issue. If there's anything vertical near an obstacle or hazard I just shoot that to get a general idea of distance and I have it out of my pocket, distance shot, and back in my pocket in seconds.

 

For me using the Skycaddie was too cumbersome and the Neo+ yardage was off by as much as 10 yards (while sitting on a 150 yard marker). I just shoot the flag and work my shot from there.

 

The only inconvenience is when someone asks me what distance they are while I'm in the cart...I shoot it from the cart and tell them how far I am. :)

post #184 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by cajuntexan00 View Post

So I always considered these things as "cheating" and felt that a yardage book and sprinkler heads were the only real way to go.  I then moved to Dallas Texas where it is hotter than the face of the sun.  Played with a friend's GPS the other day and it was so convienient to know the exact yardage and not have to walk it off repeatedly in 104 degree heat!

 

Questions about these range finders.......

 

1.  I am tempted to get a Skycaddie because they claim someone has walked the courses and actually marks the longitude and latitude of the greens, traps, etc.  as opposed to the other's that use arial maps to estimate them.  For this feature, skycaddie charges a subscription fee.  Not sure it's worth it.  Anyone know????

 

2.  How do laser rangefinder's work?  I played with one years ago, but it required that you play a course with reflectors on the flags.  Is this no longer th case?  Do they work to find distances to traps, etc? 

 

thanks.


If you happen to have an iphone or droid there are a lot of free GPS apps out there.  I use one called Swing by Swing
 and I put up a review of sorts in the In Search Of: Unbiased GPS reviews thread.

post #185 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

If you happen to have an iphone or droid there are a lot of free GPS apps out there.  I use one called Swing by Swing
 and I put up a review of sorts in the In Search Of: Unbiased GPS reviews thread.



The problem will cell phone golf apps (at least IMHO), is that I may not get the accuracy I need for golf from them.  Regular GPS isn't good enough for golf, GPS+WAAS is and as of right now, no common cell phone supports WAAS.  What they do use is cell towers and wifi signals to improve the GPS solution.  That data can actually be better than GPS+WAAS or not, it depends on the number of cell towers, tower geometry etc.  At least with dedicated GPS it's very likely the accuracy will be good - with cell phones it can be hit or miss.  Some courses will be good, some other may not be good.  I love all of the features those apps provide and wish the dedicated GPS's had them, but until phones get WAAS, I just can't see relying on them for yardage.

post #186 of 197

We can only use laser finders in most of the events I play, so that's what I'm used to. I have two, a Bushnell Yardage Pro TourXL and a Nikon LR800. I like it in that you can aim directly at something and get yourself a yardage. I'd imagine some GPS units or Apps have that capability by now?

post #187 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post

We can only use laser finders in most of the events I play, so that's what I'm used to. I have two, a Bushnell Yardage Pro TourXL and a Nikon LR800. I like it in that you can aim directly at something and get yourself a yardage. I'd imagine some GPS units or Apps have that capability by now?



I'm surprised tournaments allow either of these things to be used.  Is that common for them to allow laser rangefinders?

 

post #188 of 197

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cajuntexan00 View Post

I'm surprised tournaments allow either of these things to be used.  Is that common for them to allow laser rangefinders?


Our PGA section events allow them as well. They speed up play and let people play new courses (to them) somewhat comfortably.

post #189 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by cajuntexan00 View Post





I'm surprised tournaments allow either of these things to be used.  Is that common for them to allow laser rangefinders?

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 


Our PGA section events allow them as well. They speed up play and let people play new courses (to them) somewhat comfortably.




Yeap, the only events it can't be used are PGA Tour/Nationwide qualifying events or USGA events (US Open, US Am qual)

post #190 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by cajuntexan00 View Post





I'm surprised tournaments allow either of these things to be used.  Is that common for them to allow laser rangefinders?

 


Yes, the Colorado Golf Association allows laser and GPS for all of their championships.  Interestingly, at the higher levels you rarely see a GPS.  Most use lasers because the better you play, the more you need accurate distance information. 

 

I have both laser and GPS.  I used to use a GolfLogix GPS, but the numbers to hazards and bunkers were sometimes so vague that I needed the laser to back it up.  This spring I bought a Garmin Approach G5 GPS, and now I rarely use the laser any more.  The Garmin has the ability to give me distances to any feature on the hole just by touching and dragging the target around the screen.  It even shows most prominent trees.  I've found it to be accurate for my needs without having to fall back on the laser.  It also will keep scores and stats and measure individual shots if I choose to do so. 

 

post #191 of 197
Just bought a bushel tour v2. Agree a gps is more convenient, but I like the distance accuracy of the laser. Only played 2 rounds with it, and I can see how it helps you figure out how far you really hit your clubs. Can see this helping out on the scorecard in the future.
post #192 of 197

bushnell.gif have a new one out that does both! They won't win any prizes for the screen interface, but it does the job as far as I can see (Borrowed one the other day, it worked great) Obviously it doesn't have all the features of a dedicated GPS system, but if all you want is the distance to the hole and various other points on the course, you can't go wrong.

 

Here it is ~ http://www.bushnellgolf.com/hybrid/laser_gps.cfm

 

a1_smile.gif

 

 

post #193 of 197

GPS is convenient as the display is always up with distances to hazards and green.  The problem with GPS is you can't get exact distance to where they placed the flag where as with laser you can. 

post #194 of 197

GPS vs. Rangefinder

I know this has been beat to death, but I would love a little help.

 

I generally play to a 16 handicap and I typically play once a week. I generally play around the same courses. I play when I travel, but that is only a few times a year.

 

So can you guys tell me which you think you would be more beneficial for me to own. I definitely want to make a purchase, but I just can't seem to decide which would be more beneficial to me.

post #195 of 197

I would imagine that if you play the same courses quite often, you already know about what you need to carry hazards or hit to certain things and what not so a simple GPS might even work for you.

 

The Neo+ ends up being 100 dollars and gives you front middle back of every green.  I can't speak for its accuracy, though.

post #196 of 197

I use a GPS app on my phone. If you have an Android phone or iPhone, there are tons of apps out there. Several of them are even free, or at least give you a free version without all the bells and whistles so you can try it out before you buy the full app. Most are $2 to $10. Some require a small annual fee for the better ones.

 

I think the range finder would be more accurate, but the GPS apps or so much cheaper, and several of them let you track swing by swing yardages, putts, drive distances, etc.

post #197 of 197

I have decided to go with a GPS unit because I think it has a greater impact on the game for someone of my ability.  Knowing the distance to a lay up distance or the front, middle and back of the green will greatly assist in club selection and course management whereas I am not accurate enough that knowing the exact distance to the pin really helps.

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