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GPS vs Laser Range finder - Page 3

post #37 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Yes, I have a laser rangefinder. I was looking at the skycaddie, but at 350 bucks and the fact that I can't really use it anywhere, I chose the rangefinder. I can shoot to yardage pins on driving ranges, I can scope out wedge distances, amoung other things. And, and 150 bucks, it's a lot cheaper.
post #38 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Ok, I will chime in . . .

I love my Pinseeker 1500 (no slope) range finder - I think Erik reviewed this one - bought it due to the review. It has a "pinseeker" feature that locks onto the pin by reporting to you what item was the shortest distance you targeted. So as you sweep your aim across the green, it measures trees (176ds) behind the green - hits the flag 154yds - then maybe some bushes back there too (172yds). The Pinseeker logic tells you the pin is 154. It knows you do not want the longer items it hit. Just avoid overhanging branches or other players on the green ahead. Very very quick and easy to lock onto pins. Not technique dependent.

It has one button to switch modes to let you point and shoot stuff like bunkers & trees without "pinseeking".

Also wouldn't you like to know if the flag is 4 yards or 14 yards past the lip of the front bunker? I love that. From back in the fairway, depth perception can run greenside bunkers and flags together. Once the rangefinder let's you know you have a one club cushion - THERE IS NO FEAR!!!

J.P.
post #39 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

As far as accuracy everytime I was on top of a yardage on a sprinkler the reading I got on my smartphone was accurate +/- 1 yard.[/QUOTE]

The pin must have been in the center of the green every time because thats the only place those fairway markers give you. (yes, I know some courses will give front,middle and back not many though.) I don't see pins in the dead center of many greens.
post #40 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Would an item like this serve me well if I could get it for under $200:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEWA%3AIT&rd=1

Or am I better off ponying up for the 1500? This one looks portable and I'm sure it's accurate but is it cheaper b/c it will be more difficult to steady?
post #41 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

rmgators . . .

Everyone has a different tolerence for price. If you buy a 1500 though - I am certain you will not be unhappy at all. It is not very dependent on steadiness. Very quick to shoot & read. Not like older models.

If you are into golf - (by 10 hcp looks like it) - the additional cost over the rangefinder you indicate may be just a couple rounds of golf. For a tool you will use on every approach shot for the next 5 -10 years - it is a no brainer to me to get the easiest, probably longer range unit. By the way - I don't sell 1500's - I just love mine!

Good Luck!
post #42 of 197
Thread Starter 

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

I think it would be interesting to time people setting up for their shot with GPS vs Range Finder.

I'd put my money on GPS saving more time. I pulled my drive on a par 4 saturday but really bombed it. It ended up I could had a window over a ton of trees to get to the pin, I was 150 out, but there were enough trees that i'm sure you could have had an accurate reading with a range finder, you may have had to walk out to get clear.
post #43 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
I think it would be interesting to time people setting up for their shot with GPS vs Range Finder.

I'd put my money on GPS saving more time. I pulled my drive on a par 4 saturday but really bombed it. It ended up I could had a window over a ton of trees to get to the pin, I was 150 out, but there were enough trees that i'm sure you could have had an accurate reading with a range finder, you may have had to walk out to get clear.
The point most of us with range finders make is that the number of times that situation comes up is next to zero (stuff in the way), and the number of times you want to shoot something not available via GPS are plenty.

Plus, range finders can be used on your practice range, to figure out how far your neighbor's front door is from yours, etc. They're not strictly limited to golf courses as the golf-specific GPS units are.

Most of the time (98%), I'm guessing the times would be about equal. And again, GPS doesn't give you the exact location of the hole. Just the green (front/back/middle or just middle).
post #44 of 197
Thread Starter 

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by iacas View Post
The point most of us with range finders make is that the number of times that situation comes up is next to zero (stuff in the way), and the number of times you want to shoot something not available via GPS are plenty.
I'd disagree for those of us who tend to be off the fairway frequently. Perhaps your home course is flat and open, but the North Course of my club is extreemly hilly and with acute doglegs. I find I can't see my target 10-25% of the time. My GPS program has all the bunkers/water and tree lines on the map, and it allows me to measure front back of each. I can also get a real good idea of distance to the pin via looking at the pin location for that day and getting a distance on the gps to that area. It is all touch screen.

Originally Posted by iacas View Post
Plus, range finders can be used on your practice range, to figure out how far your neighbor's front door is from yours, etc. They're not strictly limited to golf courses as the golf-specific GPS units are.
If I didn't already have a factory unit in my car I could use my GPS for driving. I can use it for walking, virtual earth, just about anything you can apply a location based signal for.

Originally Posted by iacas View Post
Most of the time (98%), I'm guessing the times would be about equal. And again, GPS doesn't give you the exact location of the hole. Just the green (front/back/middle or just middle).
For my game front/back/middle is just fine but then again we are extreemly different skill levels so I can understand your difference of opinion.
post #45 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
If I didn't already have a factory unit in my car I could use my GPS for driving. I can use it for walking, virtual earth, just about anything you can apply a location based signal for.
Dude, I'm guessing you either bought the sky caddie or got a job with them...

Or both.
post #46 of 197
Thread Starter 

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by SuaSponteMn View Post
Dude, I'm guessing you either bought the sky caddie or got a job with them...

Or both.
Why would you say that? Because I have an opinion? Did you read any of my other posts on the subject? If you did you'd see that I do not have a sky caddy, I use my phone + a GPS reciever + a program called starcaddy which has nothing to do with Sky Caddie... I have some issues with the software and I do not think it is perfect (if they had the stats of intelligolf it would be perfect) but I am simply debating the topic, but perhaps I can start trolling the thread like you are. Do you work for Bushnell?
post #47 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
I'd disagree for those of us who tend to be off the fairway frequently. Perhaps your home course is flat and open
My home course has fairways measuring 17-24 yards in width and treelines measuring about the same. One of our par fours is up a 20 degree slope. It's anything but "flat" and "open."

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
but the North Course of my club is extreemly hilly and with acute doglegs. I find I can't see my target 10-25% of the time. My GPS program has all the bunkers/water and tree lines on the map, and it allows me to measure front back of each.
The point others make is that if YOUR course is fully decked out with GPS measurements, fine. But if you travel or if your course is one of the thousands that don't have the full mapping done, you're out of luck and a range finder offers more versatility.

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
If I didn't already have a factory unit in my car I could use my GPS for driving. I can use it for walking, virtual earth, just about anything you can apply a location based signal for.
I said "golf-specific GPS" (like a SkyCaddie). Clearly a PocketPC or a handheld unit that does GPS can do quite a lot of things. Rafi uses one too.

Most courses are not as decked out (with GPS measurements) as yours. Were I at your club, I may do the same thing... but I'd still be hurting when I travel to a course that wasn't mapped.
post #48 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

I had a SkyCaddie and ended up selling because I travel a lot for work and found about half the courses I played had been mapped out with GPS. Although I did really like the SkyCaddie to help measure distances of shots which I can still do with a rangefinder.

In my opinion a rangefinder does a better job for some one who travels and/or plays many different courses. A GPS works better for someone who plays a set number of courses on a regular rotation.
post #49 of 197
Thread Starter 

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by iacas View Post
My home course has fairways measuring 17-24 yards in width and treelines measuring about the same. One of our par fours is up a 20 degree slope. It's anything but "flat" and "open."


The point others make is that if YOUR course is fully decked out with GPS measurements, fine. But if you travel or if your course is one of the thousands that don't have the full mapping done, you're out of luck and a range finder offers more versatility.


I said "golf-specific GPS" (like a SkyCaddie). Clearly a PocketPC or a handheld unit that does GPS can do quite a lot of things. Rafi uses one too.

Most courses are not as decked out (with GPS measurements) as yours. Were I at your club, I may do the same thing... but I'd still be hurting when I travel to a course that wasn't mapped.
Well the great thing about StarCaddy is the map is calibrated from satalite images for distance, so that you can click any 2 points on the map and get a measurement. The crap thing about StarCaddie is the maps are way overpriced in some ways. There are a few programs out there for Pocket PC/Windows Mobile5 that allow you to map your own course, but it takes a TON of time, so in that respect the $20 for the StarCaddie is worth it for somethign like your home course that you play all the time. As for the away courses, it is a shame that golfwitz or someone doesn't standardize the maps. Paying for them sucks, and there are 5 or 6 formats with most of the cources done over and over again.
post #50 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
I am simply debating the topic, but perhaps I can start trolling the thread like you are. Do you work for Bushnell?
I've run into a few situations here where I felt like someone was trying to sell me a product when I was simply reading the thread; that's all. You call it trolling, I call it asking a question that in my opinion was warranted. Explain to me why you would be posting under the preface that you are objectively looking at the best possible product for determining yardage, yet at the same time you're arguing for a specific product while debating against the opinion of others; it simply makes no sense. One could easily draw the conclusion that you're biased to the point of trying to market a product. I personally don't own a GPS product or a range finder but I'm objectively considering both, thank you for your thoughts on the GPS side of things
post #51 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

My Sky Caddie is Jesus. I call his name out and He gives me yardage and advice. If He gets it wrong, I mention his Father's name a few times and we move on.
post #52 of 197
Thread Starter 

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by SuaSponteMn View Post
I've run into a few situations here where I felt like someone was trying to sell me a product when I was simply reading the thread; that's all. You call it trolling, I call it asking a question that in my opinion was warranted. Explain to me why you would be posting under the preface that you are objectively looking at the best possible product for determining yardage, yet at the same time you're arguing for a specific product while debating against the opinion of others; it simply makes no sense. One could easily draw the conclusion that you're biased to the point of trying to market a product. I personally don't own a GPS product or a range finder but I'm objectively considering both, thank you for your thoughts on the GPS side of things
Did you read the first post? I doubt it. For your education I started this thread because I posted asking about which Windows Mobile GPS app people liked and it turned into a GPS VS Laser thread, so instead of taking my thread off-topic I made this one which seems to have some merit and there are many different views on the subject, however I never said I was a big fan of the range finder, or unbias, or objective.
post #53 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

Originally Posted by greenail View Post
Did you read the first post? I doubt it. For your education I started this thread because I posted asking about which Windows Mobile GPS app people liked and it turned into a GPS VS Laser thread, so instead of taking my thread off-topic I made this one which seems to have some merit and there are many different views on the subject, however I never said I was a big fan of the range finder, or unbias, or objective.
There are 6 pages on this thread, I don't really have any plans on going back and picking out your posts specifically for review. My thoughts and opinions are just that, thoughts and opinions; and they are as valid as anyone elses here. If you have anything additional for me, please feel free to post them in a private message so that this thread remains on topic and doesn't make it to page 8 based solely on an arguement you're having with me.
post #54 of 197

Re: GPS vs Laser Range finder

I have been only playing for about 2 years and went throught the same process you are about 3 months ago. I ended up buying the SkyCaddy GPS and would tell you to see if a friend or another golfer you know has one before you make the purchase. I am not sure I would buy one again but now that I have it I do use it most of the time as it says me time when playing and when not sitting next to a yardage marker or on the fairway. I travel alot and find the ability to get courses outside my area is great. I have used it in Myrtle Beach and Las Vegas as well as several courses in my home area. I have found the most benefit at local courses I have set up myself as those courses tend not to have as many markers as the more expensive courses. This does take about an extra 15 minutes the first time to set up. It does not give you measurements to get out of trouble like a RangeFinder would do - ie how far can I hit it if going across the fairway to get out of trouble, and the layup yardage from the GPS is based on an unknown golf player. It does help out in lettling me know on new courses what the carries will be but having a yardage book with pictures helps to. The skycaddy provides diffenent levels of information for different courses so all are not layed out completely some just have center green numbers. The bottom line I think is that having both is the way to go but that gets expensive, so check the Skycaddy list of courses before trying and there is a 30 day full refund policy which I almost did but kept it in the end. Hope this helps as I know when looking for information honest replys are great.
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