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"The Stack and Tilt Swing: The Definitive Guide..." by Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett - Page 7

post #109 of 124

I bought this book towards the end of last year;  despite some serious down-time away from golf (10 weeks without swinging a club earlier this year), I'm hitting the ball far better (distance and dispersion) than I was before then.  Unfortunately, I haven't played enough to get my short-game feel back, but I've seen big improvements in my long game.  My first round back after that down-time, I nearly matched my personal best for GIR.  

 

I do have a question, though:  any opinions on how this would be for near-beginners?  I was converted, after 4+ years of playing, when I did the Golf Digest article's version of the basic form (the drill with 10 balls weight forward, 10 weight forward shoulder down, and so on).  I saw improvement from that, and went out and bought the book, and have continued some improvement.  However, I'm not sure how much of that one would be able to do early on.  I'm considering getting a copy for a friend who is just beginning.

post #110 of 124
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shindig View Post

I do have a question, though:  any opinions on how this would be for near-beginners?  I was converted, after 4+ years of playing, when I did the Golf Digest article's version of the basic form (the drill with 10 balls weight forward, 10 weight forward shoulder down, and so on).  I saw improvement from that, and went out and bought the book, and have continued some improvement.  However, I'm not sure how much of that one would be able to do early on.  I'm considering getting a copy for a friend who is just beginning.


We teach our beginners the basics: weight forward, shoulder down, just as you said. The "basics" article you gave is a pretty good example.

 

Five of five junior beginners we had in camp last year were drawing every ball (some too much, but that's not a hard fix) with too much shaft lean (similar) at impact. Basically, the opposite of the problem you tend to see in beginners, and a much better starting point. Hitting the ball in the air, ball before ground, etc. All good.

 

It's tough with all beginners, but this will give them the best chance. It might be overkill, in some ways, because they'll see all this stuff about the "conventional" swing that they don't have. Just have them skip those parts.

post #111 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shindig View Post

...snip... However, I'm not sure how much of that one would be able to do early on.  I'm considering getting a copy for a friend who is just beginning.




Take a look at the start of this before and after video of what a good SnT instructor did for a beginner:



I wish I used SnT from the very beginning.

post #112 of 124


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post




Take a look at the start of this before and after video of what a good SnT instructor did for a beginner:



I wish I used SnT from the very beginning.


 

Great video!  Nick knows what he is doing

post #113 of 124

Golf Ball


Casual golfers don’t give a lot of thought to choosing the right golf ball.  They think of the golf ball as simply a tool that really isn’t important.  After all, you’re just whacking it around the course, right?  Wrong!  Having the right golf ball can gain you distance in your drives, make it easier to pull off finesse shots, and so much more!

Basically, there are three types of balls:  balata, two-piece, or a combination of both.  Golf balls are constructed with three types of purposes in mind as well:  distance, spin, and control.  Choosing an appropriate golf ball really depends on what you are looking for in your golf game.

Are you a low handicap player looking for great spin and control?  If so, choose a balata golf ball.  This is just a softer ball that has a softer cover and allows for more spin.  This is the ball that most professionals choose.  They are also more expensive than other balls.

Perhaps you have a higher handicap and are looking for more distance and durability.  This is where a good two-piece ball will be best.  This golf ball has a harder cover which creates less backspin allowing you to hit it further.

Some golf balls are designed for slower swing speeds with a lightweight construction that catches air.  They are generally marketed for women or seniors, but plenty of men will play these balls because it gets them extra distance.

Believe it or not the weather you are playing in can make a difference in which golf ball you use.  Course conditions can also dictate golf ball choice.  Let’s say the course has been deluged with rain.  In this case, you will need a ball that will travel father and produces less spin.  If you are playing on a rock hard, sun-scorched track, choose something softer that will land soft and spin.

Look at the temperature as well.  Balls for men come in two compressions – 90 and 100.  When you hit the ball, the ball compresses.  Therefore the 90 compression ball will be softer than the 100.  If it’s cold, the ball will not compress as much so you will want to play a 90 compression golf ball.  If it’s hot out, you will want to opt for the 100 compression.

In general, two piece balls are going to give you more distance and they will be more durable so they will last longer.  Solid core golf balls will offer less trajectory and can spin for better accuracy.  Even the dimples on the ball can have an effect on your game.  Smaller dimples lessen trajectory while larger dimples increase it.

Choosing the right golf ball really is important to playing a good game.  There are many, many choices on the market.  Explore which golf ball you may want to use and then try it out.  Experiment and in time, you’ll find exactly the right golf ball for you.


 

post #114 of 124

I just got the book I am interested in learning the system but the two instructors in connecticut are more in southern connecticut 

post #115 of 124

I bought the book probably about 3 weeks ago.  I've added some of the principals to my swing, and still need work, but the results are great so far.  The biggest difference I've noticed is the contact.  The chances of a fat or thin shot have decreased dramatically, and I have also started to draw the ball more often.  I'm looking forward to more improvement, and am going to read the book a second time.  I highly recommend it.

post #116 of 124

It's no secret that I've been struggling badly with my ball striking for the past year.  After a few lessons and constant rounds I found myself getting worse instead of better.  I didn't even see what my last handicap calculation was, but I would guess I'm around a 20 after the rounds I've had this year. I was a 12 at the beginning of the year.

 

So after firing two instructors and going about finding my own swing (which wasn't working either), I decided to buy this book a few weeks ago.  I set up the net in the house and started working on fundamentals like I knew nothing.  Because to be honest, I would have loved to forget everything I did this year.  I was a little hesitant to go to S&T because I had been told it was hard on your back and I already fight with serious back pain.  I had also been told that I could not make a full turn because of my back problems.  I figured out quickly that this was a lie.  The basic principles actually made it easier to get a better turn on the ball, which led to better contact and more consistent shots without any pain associated.

 

By the time I had made it through the beginning practice drill they give you, I was already making much better contact with the ball.  Added in the tucked butt and elbows together and have been hitting the ball much better on the range.  My first round after 2 weeks of practice will be tomorrow, so we will see what happens on the course, but overall I am very happy with what I've accomplished so far only halfway through the book.  Bought it on Kindle as well, so whether I'm on my Kindle, Computer or phone I always have it nearby when I need it.

 

But I will dispel the myth that people with bad backs can't do S&T, it's simply not true.  Nothing they had me doing put any discomfort on my bad back, but what they did do is found some extra yardage and control from a few small moves I was missing.

 

Thanks for giving me my game back S&T.  I will start working on the driver swing next, since that's my nemesis.

post #117 of 124

Decided to give S&T a try after playing a lot over two years and not making the progress I wanted.  I never really could generate good contact from my irons and everything I hit (except hybrids) were very short.  I thought it was my clubs until I went and hit a few new models and I still had issues.

 

I decided to give S&T a read and realized that everything they taught was the exact opposite of what I was doing.  I was always hitting behind the ball and my head really was moving.  Classic issues that were described in the book.  

 

When the weather warms up, I can't wait to go try this out in my garage or range.  So far, I like what I have read.  

post #118 of 124

Well, my first round out using S&T didn't go as well as I thought it would.

 

I was pushing a lot of shots to the right and hitting a lot of shots fat, especially with my fairway woods.  I know what I'm doing wrong, I just have to work on fixing it.  The troubleshooting section in the book told me exactly what I was doing wrong.  Driver was mediocre to poor as usual, but at least most were playable.  A lot of pop-ups and crown shots from being too steep, which is related partially to the same problem I'm having with the fairway woods.  Need to work on tucking my butt and extending my spine more through the shot.

 

It's a process and I'm not giving up on it yet.

post #119 of 124

I don't S&T...but I have read this book twice. I did improve my ball striking a lot after reading it as some of the S&T principles work very well in MY "conventional" swing so I will give it props for that.

 

But, for me, the book always leaves a bad taste due to the constant bashing of the conventional golf swing and the way they misrepresent in photos the conventional swing. They often show side by side comparisons of the S&T vs a Conventional Swing. The S&T photo will show a guy in a really good position and the convention photo will invariably show a guy in a pretty bad position that is not indicative of the conventional golf swing but the result of a bad swing in general. They authors really try to make it sound like the conventional swing has no merit at all....seems petty.

post #120 of 124

I just received my copy of the book which I purchased on ebay for .99 plus $3.48 for shipping. A real value and it seems to be the real deal, like new condition. Not too shabby considering the original price tag of $30 U.S.  At first glance, there is a LOT to read, plenty of illustrations, and regardless of whether or not I would adopt the stack and tilt swing, I am quite confident that there will be many, many, excellent tips.  Although my original bid was $4.99, there were no other bidders, so the item went for the auction price of only 99 cents!  There are plenty more on ebay. Check it out if you are interested in picking up a copy at an affordable price.

post #121 of 124

Anybody have the Kindle version of this?  Some books lose image quality in Kindle versions.  I am guessing there are quite a few diagrams in this book.  

post #122 of 124
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasbuzzard View Post
 

Anybody have the Kindle version of this?  Some books lose image quality in Kindle versions.  I am guessing there are quite a few diagrams in this book.  

 

Yep. Since the book is so cheap and in color, I'd recommend that instead.

 

You should also peruse the free information at http://purestrike5sk.com/ .

post #123 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasbuzzard View Post
 

Anybody have the Kindle version of this?  Some books lose image quality in Kindle versions.  I am guessing there are quite a few diagrams in this book.  

 

I wanted an ebook version of this before it was available as an ebook, so I just photographed it and put it online for private consumption. It was awhile before it was available for the Kindle. Definitely buy the Kindle version.

 

post #124 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Yep. Since the book is so cheap and in color, I'd recommend that instead.

 

You should also peruse the free information at http://purestrike5sk.com/ .

Oh, believe me, I have.  I started this whole renewed golf thing by looking at some golf books and instruction.  I never broke 100 for the years I played but I never really took what I was doing seriously.  It was more just goofing off.  I am a bit more mature (kinda) and more serious about it.  I am buying the ebook momentarily.  Thanks.

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