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post #37 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Cincinnatus

http://www.cincinnatusbook.com/
post #38 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

My golf reading has mostly included books on architecture, course profiles and such. A number I want to read though, including Golf In the Kingdom and The Greatest Game Ever Played -- on the strong recommendations stated on this thread.

Sean
post #39 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Haven't actually read that many, come to think of it. "Strokes of Genius," collection of Thomas Boswell's golf writing. "A Good Walk Spoiled."

"The Great Gatsby" takes place on Long Island. That should count for something.

Cheers,
DoctorK
post #40 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Originally Posted by justincredible View Post
Uh, how about giving us some reason for why you're recommending it? Or are you just the author trying to shill more books?
post #41 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Originally Posted by Clambake View Post
Uh, how about giving us some reason for why you're recommending it? Or are you just the author trying to shill more books?
Hah, I wish.

My wife are currently reading it. She bought it for her dad for Christmas because she thought he would like it. It usually takes him a while to get through books but he read this one in a short period as he couldn't put it down. He gave it back to us so she could read it and we each started in on it this weekend while we took turns driving to North Carolina from Ohio and back. I haven't finished it yet but so far it is one of the best mysteries I have ever read.
post #42 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

I just finished reading two books that are oriented towards golf history more than anything.

The Making of the Masters, by David Owen: Chronology of the inception of Augusta. Owen is one of the only journalists to be given free range to Augusta's historical archives and membership records. Probably the best book on the history of the club.

The Ultimate Golf Book: A History and Celebration of the World's Greatest Game, by Charles McGrath, David McCormick, and John Garrity: The title is pretty self explanatory. The book follows the outline of Scotland, America, Equipment, The Early Tour Years, Television, The Course, The Spectators, and The Swing (not a huge emphasis on instruction, just basic stuff). There are some great, topical articles scattered through the book as well. Includes great golf stories that you can impress your buddies with on the course.

Both of these were at my public library.
post #43 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Originally Posted by Fatphil View Post
Dan Jenkins "Dead Solid Perfect"....comedy, sarcastic, same like he writes in the golf magazines. Make's Tiger's behavior seem tame.
Just got this from the local library and it was a great read!
post #44 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Is there any good books on golf fitness?
post #45 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

I have no idea if this book is available stateside, but it certainly is in the UK & it is extremely funny..."The Wit of Golf" by Barry Johnston.
A bumper bag of humorous anecdotes and amusing tales from golf's best-loved personalities that proves golf is a funny old game -- birdies, bunkers and all! Read hilarious stories covering everything from caddies to the clubhouse by the game's all-time great characters, including Peter Alliss, Nick Faldo, Sandy Lyle, Sam Torrance and Ian Woosnam. Enjoy the humour of legendary players such as Seve Ballesteros, Tony Jacklin, Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino and Tiger Woods, as they share the funny side of playing in the Open Championship and the Ryder Cup. Laugh-out-loud at celebrity golfers Bruce Forsyth and Michael Parkinson's rib-tickling anecdotes about pro-am tournaments and club golf. THE WIT OF GOLF is a wonderful collection of jokes, stories and anecdotes, perfect for any golf fan.
post #46 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Speaking of the book "Paper Tiger" by Tom Coyne anyone else think the guy might be over exaggerating his golf handicap? The guy never hit below 75 in any of the tournaments he played...
post #47 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Originally Posted by Easy View Post
Speaking of the book "Paper Tiger" by Tom Coyne anyone else think the guy might be over exaggerating his golf handicap? The guy never hit below 75 in any of the tournaments he played...
probably the difference between just playing a round to actually playing in a tournament. I remember one part where he was in a bar talking to an English player and cady, the player was something like +6 and was having a hard time getting into tournaments.
post #48 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

I just read two golf/mystery books that I realy enjoyed. The name of the books are "A Tight Lie" and "Water Hazzard" by Don Dahler. They are about a PGA tour player named "Huckleberry Dyle" who although he struggles on the tour he moonlights as a Private Investigator. Very intertaining and some good insight to what PGA players go though.I was suprised you could mix golf and mystery but Don Dahler did a great job. I hope there will be more books in this series about "Huck Dyle"

I just started a book by Rick Reilly called "Missing Links". It is hilarious, I can't stop laughing as I read it.

Mark
post #49 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Let me recommend A Golfer's Education, by Darren Kilfara. Mr. Kilfara was a college golfer at Harvard who decided it would be a good idea to do his junior year abroad as a history major in the town of St. Andrews where he could write a thesis on something or other, and by the oddest coincidence he could also get a one-year unlimited play pass at the Old Course for $150. His trip was partially financed by Golf Digest in exchange for feeding them articles.

He describes playing the OC throughout the year, along with other outstanding but lesser known courses in the area, and there's a romance thrown in as he ends up marrying the young woman who was his official "greeter" when he arrived at the university.

The book is quite well written and the descriptions of the courses are first-rate. You'll want to go over there to play them, or maybe to find a lass of your own, or both. Why not?
post #50 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Who's Your Caddy By Rick Reilly. Worth the Read, an excellent book!

Varsity_Golf
post #51 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Originally Posted by Easy View Post
Speaking of the book "Paper Tiger" by Tom Coyne anyone else think the guy might be over exaggerating his golf handicap? The guy never hit below 75 in any of the tournaments he played...
a lot of people say that but idk i believe him. whats the point of lying about your handicap in a book like this
post #52 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

Some old ones I still love to re-read (you'll probably have to go through Interlibrary Loan to find them):

Golf Is My Game, Bobby Jones
Teed Off, Dave Hill
Pro: Frank Beard on the Golf Tour, Frank Beard
The Bogey Man, George Plimpton
post #53 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

A little different type of book is "Miracle on the 17th Green". It is a great story and easy read.
post #54 of 103

Re: Non-Instructional Golf Books

any one read Golf in the Kingdom ?
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