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Flat Swing Plane

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
What is the disadvantages to my swing plan being flat. I kind of have the belief that what ever works for you should do. And for my, the flat swing seems very natural and smooth. I hit the ball fairly well when well practiced. I guess my question is, what limitations can I expect from my swing?



For instance, this shot was perfect, right down the middle, beautiful ball flight and good distance. However if you showed this to some people, they would **** their pants lol.

Looking forward to hearing your ideas.
post #2 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Well, the only disadvantage that I could think of is that a flatter swing will be more like a baseball swing, I guess you should be hitting pretty far, but my guess is probably lacking of accuracy. Take it to extreme situation, if you are hitting at an 0 deg compared to ground, the chance to get the club face square is quite hard. Another is if you are swinging at 90 deg, it's much easier to get the club face squared. Well...just my personal opinion, no hard feeling...
post #3 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

I like it. Your initial takeaway goes a bit too far behind you, and your clubface is a bit shut at the top of the backswing, but if you compensate consistently, I think you have a nice, simple one plane swing.

Matt Kuchar's swing might be a good model for you to emulate
post #4 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Your swing plane isn't half as big a problem as your takeaway is.As someone mentioned already, you pull it too far back behind you.But more importantly, your takeaway is all hands and arms.Your hips don't start turning until the club is almost horizontal with the ground, and your shoulders and torso don't start moving until your hands have moved way back.You need to turn your whole core in one movement.That is, your shoulders, arms, torso, and some hip movement together.(The Matt Kuchar video that uttexas posted is perfect for comparing your takeaway to his.)

But as for your original point, personally I think a flat swing plane is more encouraging for a high handicapper or beginner to have than a steep plane that results in slices all the time.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

Re: Flat Swing Plane

thanks for the ideas guys, I will work on that and see what happens
post #6 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

There are no limitations to a flat swing plane. So long as your clubface is perpendicular to your swing plane at impact, it doesn't matter whether the plane is flat or steep. I prefer a flat swing plane, and Hogan seemed to do OK with what many consider to be "too flat" a swing plane.



Here are a couple of good places to check out, if you want to get more involved in swing planes, especially the flatter, "one-plane" theory. Lots of videos:
www.jimhardygolf.com
http://www.jeffrittergolf.com/

Good Luck!
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by Randy4h View Post
There are no limitations to a flat swing plane. So long as your clubface is perpendicular to your swing plane at impact, it doesn't matter whether the plane is flat or steep.
Good Luck!
That is a very good point, why do most pros and teachers perfer the step swing plan? is it more consistant?
post #8 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by linkin22luke View Post
why do most pros and teachers perfer the step swing plan? is it more consistant?
My guess is that most teachers/instructors in their prime right now grew up idolizing Mr. Nicklaus---he did rather well with a two plane steep swing
post #9 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by linkin22luke View Post
That is a very good point, why do most pros and teachers perfer the step swing plan? is it more consistant?
On tour, there are probably an equal amount of flat planes (Kuchar, Campbell, Kim, Scott) as there are upright (Toms, Casey, Watson). Every pro is looking for a swing that they can repeat under pressure.

Each person has a swing plane that is preferable for them. It could be the method they were taught when they were young, it could be their physical attributes or liabilities. For example, a flatter swing plane requires a more pronounced rotation of your torso. People who can't rotate very well are not going to do well with a flat swing plane.
post #10 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

My swing plane is very flat, and I do very well with it, and although I would like it a bit more upright, I don't fight what comes natural to me. The big issue is the takeaway. If you take it back too far to the inside on the takeaway, it promotes coming too far from the inside on the downswing, which ='s hard to control. One thing I do like is that your wrists don't twist open then shut in the swing, they stay controlled. Also, If you have a flat swing, you don't want your hips to spin too much. If they do, you lose control. Focus on keeping your right foot on the ground until impact. After that, just don't try to swing too hard and play a control game. Good luck.
post #11 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by uttexas View Post
My guess is that most teachers/instructors in their prime right now grew up idolizing Mr. Nicklaus---he did rather well with a two plane steep swing
Some of them did, but others switched away from super steep at about age 40. One told me it's too athletically demanding to maintain as you get older.

My pro, in his early 30s, has encouraged me in developing a flatter swing. He studies Hogan a lot. BUT, he prides himself on drawing out your natural swing.
post #12 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

honestly, i think height plays the biggest factor in swing plane. the taller you are, the steeper you swing, the shorter you are the flatter you swing.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by senorchipotle View Post
honestly, i think height plays the biggest factor in swing plane. the taller you are, the steeper you swing, the shorter you are the flatter you swing.
hmmm, but i am 6'3'' . i would actually disagree with that, most tall guys i have seen have had flatter swing. My golf partern is like 5'6'' and his swing is the stereotypical steep "perfect" swing, same with alot of shorter guys i know
post #14 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by senorchipotle View Post
honestly, i think height plays the biggest factor in swing plane. the taller you are, the steeper you swing, the shorter you are the flatter you swing.
Not true. Matt Kuchar is around 6'3", and has a very flat swing plane. Hogan was around 5'9". Height makes no difference.
post #15 of 15

Re: Flat Swing Plane

Originally Posted by MiniMoe View Post
The big issue is the takeaway. If you take it back too far to the inside on the takeaway, it promotes coming too far from the inside on the downswing, which ='s hard to control. One thing I do like is that your wrists don't twist open then shut in the swing, they stay controlled. .
excellent. I learned in the '70's copying Nicklaus,, screwed me up for years...but as you say the trap that is easy to fall into with a flat plane is whipping the shaft and clubhead inside and not properly hinging the wrists upwards...the guy in the video has no problem with his swing plane, but his wrists rolled inward and not upward...to me its kinda like the kids game where you rub your stomach in a circular motion and try to pat your head up and down...they are two conflicting motions that takes a bit of muscle memory to get correct.
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