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Putting - looking at the hole, not the ball - Page 2

post #19 of 44

It works!

It works!

It works!

Bloody hell it works!

 

I am a terrible putter (shot 92 the other day with 42 putts) and they were true putts not counting using the putter 6 inches of the green as a putt.

4 putted 3 times!

I read about this 'looking at the hole' technique and it just seemed to make so much sense.

Tried it at the range today on the practice green.

FANBLOODYTASTIC!

Hit the first few putts 4-6 feet past the hole from 20+ feet (always, always leave my putts way short).

Then really concentrated on 'how hard do I need to throw/roll this ball to that hole over there'.

AND... wow putt after putt rolled up to and occasionally into the hole. Three putted once in a hundred plus attempts, brushed the turf 3 times before the ball early on.

It just felt sensible to me. I didn't have to 'remember' where the hole was, where the breaks were etc. because I was looking at them.

For a first attempt I cannot quite believe it was so easy to hit the ball so true, and how I just knew how hard to hit it!

 

If you putt well (the few of you who do) why switch.

If you are like me and just can't judge distance well (I've played for 20 years and practiced my heart out) and still just don't get it then have an open mind and just give it a go.

Come and join me on 'CLOUD 9'

 

Stug:dance:

post #20 of 44
Sorry, the exact opposite for me. I line up the putt and then set the putter behind the ball square to the line. With the 2-ball putter I can set the club square to the intended start line, then take my stance around the club as it's set. Once I'm set I don't look at the hole again except for a quick glance to reinforce the pace. I'm focused only on the line formed by the 3 balls (2 on the putter head and one on the ground).

This is highly specific to me and my putter, but I make a fair number of putts this way.
post #21 of 44

I have fantastic results looking at the hole on lag puts. I don't think hitting a baseball is a good analogy. Golf balls aren't coming at you  on an unpredictable path at 90MPH. It's more like shooting a free throw. You don't stare at your hand, you stare at the hoop. I also think it's like throwing darts. I tend to do better if I focus on the target and let my mind and body work out the physics.

 

That being said, I still try to make myself do it conventionally, despite doing it better the other way.

post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinseeker81 View Post

I have fantastic results looking at the hole on lag puts. I don't think hitting a baseball is a good analogy. Golf balls aren't coming at you  on an unpredictable path at 90MPH. It's more like shooting a free throw. You don't stare at your hand, you stare at the hoop. I also think it's like throwing darts. I tend to do better if I focus on the target and let my mind and body work out the physics.

That being said, I still try to make myself do it conventionally, despite doing it better the other way.

That's probably normal but weird.
We all have different swings for the rest of the game.
If it works it works I personally don't give a monkeys what anyone else thinks.
My 92 might have been an 82 nobody coupled think a weird putting stroke wasn't worth it.
As 20ish handicapper I might have won something!
post #23 of 44

Had a bad day on the greens yesterday, coming back from a very bad back injury so I am just trying to groove my swing again, but 3 putted 3 times in the first 12 holes. On #13 started looking at the hole only (have done this on and off for awhile). Made everything inside 5 feet and my lags were right there. Sometimes you just need to change it up.

post #24 of 44

It's a good exercise, I think I first read about it in "Putting out of your mind" by Bob Rotella.  He used it as a technique to help a pro he was working with.  If I find I'm getting too mental in my stroke I'll practice looking at the hole to get back into a normal rhythm.

post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCF View Post

This topic is covered in Golf Magazine's "The Best Instruction Book Ever!" I don't have it handy right now, but it cited a study which revealed that the experimental group (looking at the hole) got closer the the hole on long putts of about 25 feet or more than the control group (looking at the ball).


If anyone's interested, I can scan and post the pages from the book on this thread.

I would definitely like to read that, so yeah please scan and post.

I've never thought about putting this way and can't wait to try it. Thanks for posting it.
post #26 of 44

I'm not a particularly good putter.

 

I have tried and liked the concept of looking at the target.  There is a piece of my mind that really believes that I can aim the putt better that way.  The down side, particularly on lag putts is that I have a much harder time striking the ball cleanly.  For this reason I have given up looking at the cup/target line instead of the ball on longer putts.  On putts inside 10 feet, however, I have mixed thoughts.  There are times I really feel like looking at the cup/target line allows me to make a smoother or more relaxed stroke, and putts seem to drop at least as often as when concentrating on the ball.  My teacher thinks it is stupid, so I am trying to avoid doing it at this point.

post #27 of 44

Your teacher must be a 'Bit Stupid' if you show better results with something just because it's unconventional.

I have tried and tried the 'normal' way but just seem to instantly forget how hard to hit the ball.

If anyone else tries it, just look at the hole or the intended target for breaking putts and seriously think about rolling the ball along the green as you would with your hand and it always goes where you want (if you misjudge the pace it's because you misread the green, i.e. slope, length/lie of the grass etc. but not because you sort of just hit it!

Missing or striking the ball off centre isn't an issue. As someone else said, just 'cos you are looking at the ball doesn't mean you adjust your plane mid stroke if it's a bit off.

 

Steve

post #28 of 44

I pick a line and hit without looking at the hole as well.  It seems to work OK I guess as I rarely do worse than 3-putt.  The biggest thing that I think helped my putting was learning to keep my backswing and forwardswing roughly the same.

post #29 of 44

putting is really tough.

Im still surprised when a putt goes in.

In the long game I usually  know where my ball will fly and will end up before i start my swing, but in putting when Im rolling the putt I'm at the mercy of the ground.

Also a sidehill/downhill is so hard to read correctly consistently.

 

I dont even try to look at the hole if its a downhill/sidehill....speed is so critical


Edited by dchoye - 10/22/13 at 4:10pm
post #30 of 44
Just a quick update.
Played my first round ever looking at the hole and have only practiced for half an hour a couple of days ago.
Shot a gross 93 with 2.2 putts per hole.
Hit a lot of greens with mid to short irons so a lot of long putts.
Still 3 putted 3 times but felt much better already.
4-5 lip outs from 5-10 feet.
Need a lot of practice, but felt much more confident and had better figures even on my first ever try.
I suppose for me the easy thing is I couldn't putt any worse so nothing to lose.
post #31 of 44

Me again.

Getting better and better at this.

Picking a line, near a leaf, spike mark etc. lining up, looking at hole and stroking the ball with much more consistent results.

Now have decided any putt where I can see the ball and the hole i.e. 6ft and less I am looking at the ball (sinking loads more) and any thing 6 - 12 ft approx. I am looking at hole if the distance will be the biggest problem i.e. uphill etc.and if it's flat and no big breaks I look at the ball.

Possibly I'm also improving because I'm spending a lot of time practising me new 'technique' which is equating to much more practise than I am used to,

Don't know the answer but I do know that I am enjoying putting now and not automatically thinking '3 putts at best!'

 

:surrender:

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stug View Post
 

Me again.

Getting better and better at this.

Picking a line, near a leaf, spike mark etc. lining up, looking at hole and stroking the ball with much more consistent results.

Now have decided any putt where I can see the ball and the hole i.e. 6ft and less I am looking at the ball (sinking loads more) and any thing 6 - 12 ft approx. I am looking at hole if the distance will be the biggest problem i.e. uphill etc.and if it's flat and no big breaks I look at the ball.

Possibly I'm also improving because I'm spending a lot of time practising me new 'technique' which is equating to much more practise than I am used to,

Don't know the answer but I do know that I am enjoying putting now and not automatically thinking '3 putts at best!'

 

:surrender:

What happens on a putt with break? If you are aiming at a leaf, spike mark shouldn't you be looking at that and not the hole?

post #33 of 44

No it's a feel thing.

Line up your 4 foot to the leaf/spike mark etc. so you are comfortable with the direction.

Head up, look at the hole with a feel for the 2 ft outside the line you might be hitting it and it is just so obvious how hard to stroke it.

You need to concentrate on the hole but be comfortable you may not be putting at the hole itself (because of break) otherwise you will pull it at the hole and not hit it true.

Seems weird but you really do not need to look at the ball to make a clean stroke. In my experience.

Distance control is fantastic and even if you push/pull it it's only by a foot or two so you are around the hole for a tap in.

 

Steve

post #34 of 44

I understand the not looking at the ball thing. I just don't get why you would look at the hole when you are playing break

post #35 of 44

For me (I have always been into all ball sports) it's having a proper finishing point for the putt. This ball needs to go there!

For me it's eliminated all the 5-10 foot short putts because I'm not remembering where the hole is I KNOW where the hole is!

post #36 of 44

I think for many, whether they will have success with this method depends on whether they're more of a "linear putter" or more of a "non-linear putter."

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