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backswing plane

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
been working on keeping elbow together and flattening left wrist at the top to improve my swing plane.
found this great drill on youtube.com

post #2 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Nice video, thanks.
post #3 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Hmmm... a few things I disagree with:

- At 1:07, he says to turn just the shoulders. If he did that, the right arm would not collapse. Obviously, he is pulling the left arm across the chest, so the hands move from being dead center of the chest to outside the right shoulder. That left to right movement of the arms relative to the chest happens in every person's swing (although not necessarily to the extent that he does it).
- Not a big fan of rolling the arms open 90 degrees. I'm sure I rotate mine a little, although I try to limit it. What he's describing is going to require some good timing to get back to square by impact.

However, the notion of the arms working close together and in unison is probably a good one for a lot of people.
post #4 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by Rexx View Post
Hmmm... a few things I disagree with:

- At 1:07, he says to turn just the shoulders. If he did that, the right arm would not collapse. Obviously, he is pulling the left arm across the chest, so the hands move from being dead center of the chest to outside the right shoulder. That left to right movement of the arms relative to the chest happens in every person's swing (although not necessarily to the extent that he does it).
- Not a big fan of rolling the arms open 90 degrees. I'm sure I rotate mine a little, although I try to limit it. What he's describing is going to require some good timing to get back to square by impact.

However, the notion of the arms working close together and in unison is probably a good one for a lot of people.
That and his "ideal" swing plane looks pretty flat, low and compact to me.
post #5 of 18

Re: backswing plane

The hands are way out ahead of him and the shoulders have turned too flat. If you get it right, I see that it might help in finding a good position, but I'd rather suggest buying a mirror.

Look at the position he is at down the line, hands way outside the stance line, club very flat, he'll have to drop and loop the arms down to avoid coming severly over the top.
post #6 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
The hands are way out ahead of him and the shoulders have turned too flat. If you get it right, I see that it might help in finding a good position, but I'd rather suggest buying a mirror.

Look at the position he is at down the line, hands way outside the stance line, club very flat, he'll have to drop and loop the arms down to avoid coming severly over the top.
I can't tell if he is getting ready to hit a golf ball, or a pinata.
post #7 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
The hands are way out ahead of him and the shoulders have turned too flat. If you get it right, I see that it might help in finding a good position, but I'd rather suggest buying a mirror.

Look at the position he is at down the line, hands way outside the stance line, club very flat, he'll have to drop and loop the arms down to avoid coming severly over the top.
I'm with you on this one. If you follow all his gobbledygook, it also determines how far you should stand from the ball. Also, the correct swing plane is not always perpendicular to the spine. If his comment that the right swing plane is "automatic" there would be a lot more better golfers out there. I use a mirror and always try to have my swing plane go through my shoulder line.
post #8 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by CalBoomer View Post
I'm with you on this one. If you follow all his gobbledygook, it also determines how far you should stand from the ball. Also, the correct swing plane is not always perpendicular to the spine. If his comment that the right swing plane is "automatic" there would be a lot more better golfers out there. I use a mirror and always try to have my swing plane go through my shoulder line.
Why would you spend all that time practicing when all you need to do is turn your arms perpendicular to your spin and stand 8 feet from the ball? ;)
post #9 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by CalBoomer View Post
Also, the correct swing plane is not always perpendicular to the spine.
Sure it is. if you move your shoulders in a circle around the top of your spine (between your shoulders), that's the plane.

It's nowhere near this guy's plane though...

Originally Posted by delav View Post
Why would you spend all that time practicing when all you need to do is turn your arms perpendicular to your spin and stand 8 feet from the ball? ;)
Yeah. Look at where the shaft points - I think eight feet was generous. The shaft hits the ground probably 20 feet in front of him. Lovely. I've gotta post this to Facebook.
post #10 of 18

Re: backswing plane

WTF is this guy smoking?? He's acting like an 8 year old that has to piss the whole time he's recording this "tip"
post #11 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by iacas View Post
Sure it is. if you move your shoulders in a circle around the top of your spine (between your shoulders), that's the plane.

It's nowhere near this guy's plane though...



Yeah. Look at where the shaft points - I think eight feet was generous. The shaft hits the ground probably 20 feet in front of him. Lovely. I've gotta post this to Facebook.
Sorry, but I don't agree. If my swing plane comes through my shoulder line, it's angle with my spine depends on how far I'm leaning forward and how far away from the ball I am at address. If I'm relatively bent over and farther from the ball, it may be close to perpendicular. If I'm more upright and closer to the ball, it's probably above perpendicular.
post #12 of 18

Re: backswing plane

Originally Posted by CalBoomer View Post
Sorry, but I don't agree. If my swing plane comes through my shoulder line, it's angle with my spine depends on how far I'm leaning forward and how far away from the ball I am at address. If I'm relatively bent over and farther from the ball, it may be close to perpendicular. If I'm more upright and closer to the ball, it's probably above perpendicular.
You seem to have completely misread my post. The correct plane for the shoulders to turn on is always perpendicular to the spine.

That's not the same angle the club shaft will go on. I never said that.

It's nearly midnight, and I had a long day in the sun, so I'm going to bed.
post #13 of 18

Re: backswing plane

During his intro I was half expecting him to refer to "snakes on a plane".

Very painful watchiing this guy - had to take a couple breaks.
post #14 of 18
Bumping an old thread to ask this, I know the mods prefer a resurrection to having hundreds of backswing plane threads!

This is not my priority piece but it is a nagging question, here goes.

In a DTL from A1 to A2 I'm very consistent at keeping my hands on the original shaft plane line but my club head varies, it is almost always inside the line but how far inside it goes depends on the day. As I understand it, this is mostly a function of wrist cock rates. My question is, what's more important, keeping the hands along that line or the position of the clubhead? I seem to look more like Steve Stricker with Ricky Fowler being the opposite extreme.

If my hands are staying on plane should I just let well enough alone or is this something I'll need to address at some point.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

In a DTL from A1 to A2 I'm very consistent at keeping my hands on the original shaft plane line but my club head varies, it is almost always inside the line but how far inside it goes depends on the day. As I understand it, this is mostly a function of wrist cock rates. My question is, what's more important, keeping the hands along that line or the position of the clubhead? I seem to look more like Steve Stricker with Ricky Fowler being the opposite extreme.

 

"Where" exactly A2 is located is largely a function of wrist cock rates. Where the clubhead is located around A2 is a function of wrist cock rates and wrist (forearm) roll rates.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

"Where" exactly A2 is located is largely a function of wrist cock rates. Where the clubhead is located around A2 is a function of wrist cock rates and wrist (forearm) roll rates.
Thanks for the reply Erik.

So less roll = less inside?

Is inside (in this definition) a fault or just an idiosyncrasy?
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

Is inside (in this definition) a fault or just an idiosyncrasy?

 

It depends. You might not like this answer, but:

a) Raymond Floyd

b) Does it cause a fault later on in the swing or do you recover like a?

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

It depends. You might not like this answer, but:

a) Raymond Floyd

b) Does it cause a fault later on in the swing or do you recover like a?

Well, I seem to be ok (ahem...relatively speaking of course) at the top so I guess I recover, none of my Evolvr teachers have ever mentioned it anyway.

 

Thanks for your answers, it's enough to let me stop worrying about it. May be an issue at a later date but it doesn't seem to be hampering me now.

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