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Shorter (Probably Better) Swing? Keep the Right Arm Straight - Page 2

post #19 of 55

This advice worries me some. I think that one of the major faults I see among average players is straightening the right arm too quickly on the downswing. Because the swing happens somewhat quickly I fear that players may straighten at the wrong time.

 

Not to rebut what you are saying because I do agree with the statement that keeping the right arm straighter will help shorten the swing, but my worry is it could be improperly executed.

post #20 of 55

Great advice! I had actually started doing this on my own a few weeks back when I realized why my punch shots were going further than my normal shots.

 

This method has greatly helped with my weight shift and is getting me closer to hitting more GIRs (now have the distance on most holes - just have to work on my aim with all those bunkers)

post #21 of 55

So a shorter swing is the objective?

 

I've always thought that a big turn was the goal. I'm having trouble envisioning this straight right arm idea. It seems to me like the right arm is almost always bent in the backswing.

 

Is there a video somewhere out there that illustrates the right arm extensor action?

 

Thanks, gang.  

post #22 of 55
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mchepp View Post

This advice worries me some. I think that one of the major faults I see among average players is straightening the right arm too quickly on the downswing. Because the swing happens somewhat quickly I fear that players may straighten at the wrong time.

 

Thing is, people that "run out of right arm" too quickly are almost always the people who OVERFLEX the right elbow on the backswing. It overflexes so they feel the need to throw it out quickly during the backswing.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mchepp View Post

Not to rebut what you are saying because I do agree with the statement that keeping the right arm straighter will help shorten the swing, but my worry is it could be improperly executed.

 

Everything could be, but at the same time... this advice works more than virtually any other type of "tip" we'll give students. We'll even put a tube around their right elbow so they can't flex the right elbow much at all (30 degrees maybe?) and that works well too.

 

It's pretty safe.


And Mike, since you know about these kinds of things... it's just extensor action transitioning into a pitch elbow. This thread's from last May and we're still using it with quite a lot of success.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by redddog View Post

So a shorter swing is the objective?

 

I've always thought that a big turn was the goal. I'm having trouble envisioning this straight right arm idea. It seems to me like the right arm is almost always bent in the backswing.

 

Is there a video somewhere out there that illustrates the right arm extensor action?


90-100 degrees is about all you need. Swinging back any farther can make the ball move out of your sight and, well, that's not great.

 

Yes, the right arm will bend. The problem is that it overflexes in, oh, 127% of people, give or take 26%. a1_smile.gif The feeling of not letting it bend works pretty well.

post #23 of 55

hmm, never thought of it from that perspective. I have a huge issue with overswinging, so i will give this a try.

post #24 of 55

Anyone have a vid that shows an example of this?

 

I know I keep asking but thankfully, there seems to be millions of golf teaching vids and it helps a ton to see it.

post #25 of 55

i saw a video where the guy was saying that you should feel like you're holding a small towel taut through the backswing, with the right arm providing the pulling force, keeping the left arm straight.  is this the same principle?

post #26 of 55

The first comment is very interesting. I did not know that. I will have to think about this some more. On the surface it makes sense.

 

The second comment, yes I understand it. I think pitch elbow is a big key for a ton of players. Most of us lousy golfers get ourselves into a semi-punch and the elbows start pulling apart like opposing magnets.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

 

Thing is, people that "run out of right arm" too quickly are almost always the people who OVERFLEX the right elbow on the backswing. It overflexes so they feel the need to throw it out quickly during the backswing.

 



And Mike, since you know about these kinds of things... it's just extensor action transitioning into a pitch elbow. This thread's from last May and we're still using it with quite a lot of success.

 

 

post #27 of 55
I'll just want to say that this is a really good swing thought (slash) drill. I worked on it a little some time ago and it worked great. I will be giving it some attention again when I got some other stuff worked out. Overswinging is a good way to make the swing a lot more difficult. The theory that a longer swing and more stuff bending causing prematurely release is definitely valid. Let the wrists hinge fully, but limit the amount the arms bend by keeping the right arm straight, or feel like you are pulling the left arm out.

That's not to say you can't swing longer and still get into a good impact position, but the higher your handicap is, the more likely you are to flip and do all sorts of bad stuff.
post #28 of 55

Quick question on this.

 

It seems like you can either keep your elbow in (to avoid the flying elbow) OR keep your right elbow straighter. I'm sure I'm missing something or misunderstanding.

 

Any further guidance?

 

Thanks all!

post #29 of 55

Great tip, this was one thought that got me under a 5 last year.  It helped me keep that clubhead arc close to maximum width so striking precision was much more consistent and made it much easier to keep awareness of where it is.

post #30 of 55
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by redddog View Post

It seems like you can either keep your elbow in (to avoid the flying elbow) OR keep your right elbow straighter. I'm sure I'm missing something or misunderstanding.

 

Any further guidance?


No. You can do both. The point of "straighter" is to stop it from bending beyond 90 degrees. Doesn't matter where the right elbow is - flying or otherwise.

post #31 of 55

So if I keep the right elbow from bending 90 degrees, I'm there?

 

Thanks fellas. I'll give it a go.

post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by redddog View Post

It seems like you can either keep your elbow in (to avoid the flying elbow) OR keep your right elbow straighter. I'm sure I'm missing something or misunderstanding.

Any further guidance?


No. You can do both. The point of "straighter" is to stop it from bending beyond 90 degrees. Doesn't matter where the right elbow is - flying or otherwise.

Iacas, I hope this isn't too far off topic but what amount of grip pressure do you recommend for the swing, on a scale of 1-10? I often find myself at about an 8 and I'm worried i'm strangling the club.
post #33 of 55
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by walk18 View Post

Iacas, I hope this isn't too far off topic but what amount of grip pressure do you recommend for the swing, on a scale of 1-10? I often find myself at about an 8 and I'm worried i'm strangling the club.


Short answer: 8 is fine.

 

Medium answer: Grip the club firmly but retain fairly loose wrists and forearms.

 

Long answer: PGA Tour pros will tell you that they grip the club with about a pressure of 3-4. Yet their hands are stronger, so their 3-4 is equivalent to the average golfer's 7-8. So if you have really strong hands then you might be better off feeling 3. If you have weaker hands, you'll want to feel 7 or 8. The trick in all of this is to retain relatively loose wrists while using the fingers to grip the club firmly. It takes some practice to do this - grip the club firmly and have a friend grab the clubhead and twist and lift and move it all around so you can feel the tension in your wrists. Learn to separate squeezing hard with the fingers versus tight wrists and forearms.

post #34 of 55

I have three things to say.......

 

 

1.  Great thread

 

2.  I can never be reminded enough to try and work on the feeling of the extensor action -- everytime I read this (or remember/remind myself of this action), the results are very good.

 

3.  It is SO easy in this game to forget and/or get away from things that work -- I think it is always a good idea to keep a journal of tips/thoughts/actions that have proven successful in the past and need further reinforcement though practice time. 

post #35 of 55

I like that advice but unfortunately I think most instructors will disagree.  I don't think it conforms to the "PGA-approved" swing method.  Like you said, my right arm isn't fully straight but I feel like I'm making a wider back swing.  I try to feel my left bicept on my chest at the end of the back swing but don't force a big shoulder turn or body coil.  My back isn't that great and I simply can't make big turns without losing my posture or feeling like my upper body is moving all over the place.

 

Anyway, I've been hitting the ball better doing what you describe and focusing on a wide back swing (versus longer) and comfortable shoulder turn.  The game is more fun.  Now if I can just keep tension from creeping into my swing and causing me chicken wing and thin the ball, life would be great.

 

Good advice.

post #36 of 55
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Topper View Post

I like that advice but unfortunately I think most instructors will disagree. I don't think it conforms to the "PGA-approved" swing method. Like you said, my right arm isn't fully straight but I feel like I'm making a wider back swing.

 

It's just to stop the right arm from folding beyond 90 degrees. We don't want anything close to a truly straight right arm... to be clear. The "feeling" of keeping the right arm straight tends to work pretty well though.

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by Topper View Post

Anyway, I've been hitting the ball better doing what you describe and focusing on a wide back swing (versus longer) and comfortable shoulder turn.  The game is more fun.  Now if I can just keep tension from creeping into my swing and causing me chicken wing and thin the ball, life would be great.

 

You chicken wing and thin the ball because your weight isn't forward. :-) But that's another thread...

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