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Chipping, wrist or no wrist - Page 4

post #55 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post

I had a couple of glasses of Torbreck Woodcutter's Shiraz last night.  Tasty.  If figure the wine below may be to your liking as well.  Very tasty too.  I get this one every couple of months.

 

 

SSsshhhh!! keep it down mate don't tell everyone!!

post #56 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by logman View Post

SSsshhhh!! keep it down mate don't tell everyone!!

 

Love a good Aussie Shiraz.

 

Not familiar with Tait.  Gonna look for it!   c2_beer.gif

post #57 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by logman View Post

Yes there different things(putting and chipping), but consider a 30 foot putt from the edge of the green.......we putt ......no body turn ,no wrists no body involvement at all really. But then consider the same shot but from the fringe. not 30 feet from the cup but 32 feet. So now it's suddenly important to use the body in some way......to enhance control? yeah right!  I mean that's funny!

Hell, all I'm saying is there are different ways to play that shot. I like to play the shot in a different way, big deal. I just find it funny the way you guys seem to think there's one way to do things .....the right way and the wrong way. 

When was the last time you tried to put backspin on a putt? That's the difference.

(It's also next to impossible to fat or thin a putt, which is not the case when using a putting motion with a wedge or iron.)
post #58 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by logman View Post

Yes there different things(putting and chipping), but consider a 30 foot putt from the edge of the green.......we putt ......no body turn ,no wrists no body involvement at all really. But then consider the same shot but from the fringe. not 30 feet from the cup but 32 feet. So now it's suddenly important to use the body in some way......to enhance control? yeah right!  I mean that's funny!

Hell, all I'm saying is there are different ways to play that shot. I like to play the shot in a different way, big deal. I just find it funny the way you guys seem to think there's one way to do things .....the right way and the wrong way. 

Like I said... control is different from a chip/pitch to a putt. Like I said, the putt is about having the right alignment, and like I said, the pitch is about having correct contact.


Not saying every single shot off the green needs hip turn or anything, I don't think anyone is. If you're chipping to a tight pin and you're 2 inches in the rough, you can't use the body. But you arent taking it back far enough to lose control. Pitch backswings are much longer than a putt backswing
post #59 of 71

For a chip, no wrist action on the down swing.  A hinge on the way back is up to you.  I like the consistency.  I can control the trajectory and spin with less moving parts.

post #60 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyBoy View Post

I do break my wrist on the backswing...but I hold the break thru impact.

I second this. I practiced for a little over 1 year on Phil Mickelson's Hing-and-Hold technique. Though I don't agree with his opening statement, "There is only one technique in chipping that works.".

 

 

I definitely hole out much more and leave my chips extremely close to the pin. Though I've always had a solid short game, I am at least more consistent now and don't really have bad days when it comes to chipping.

post #61 of 71

I don't, this technique brings in the leading edge of the club more, and its very hard to learn this method. Its much easier to play the ball more forward in your stance, for me usually middle of my stance. Use some good tempo and bring the bounce into play. For me, even if i hit behind the ball the bounce will carry it through the shot and the ball will end up better than duffing a chip. 

 

If i had to describe it, it would be hinge early in the backswing, your hands don't move much at all. Then rotating your body around your front knee (keeping weight forward), rotate towards the target as your unhinge into the ball. Finish with your hands close to your right thigh, i like to abbreviate the follow through. The key is to use more body rotation than you think you need. Most people use way to much hands and arms, and they flip. 

post #62 of 71

One thing that I like about the Hinge & Hold is that once you break your wrists back on the take away, you're now locking them per-say. You're then following through with hands forward and the only mental image I had when practicing this shot was focusing on making contact with the ball with the butt of the club passing the ball prior to impact. After time, it became second nature and it was merely a matter of touch and distance control which depended on how far I would need to carry the ball onto the green.

 

I personally think the Hinge and Hold technique eliminates the possibility of hitting the ball with the leading edge of the club, which is really caused by flipping the wrists instead or getting too much movement with the body. Obviously, use whatever works, but I think most people would find that rotating their body brings far too many mechanics and potential mistakes into the mix.

post #63 of 71

Completely depends on the shot for me.  Although as a standard rule I try to use as little wrist as I can (for consistency, like you said).  If I have a good lie and the grass is not thick, I will use very little wrist, starting in a forward press and simply shifting weight and opening the blade for different shots.

 

If the grass is thick and I have a hard time pushing through it with a locked wrists consistently, then I start to get more wristy.  It helps to cut through the thick grass, and your club is in contact with the grass for less time because the angle of attack on the ball is steeper (it feels like it at least, whether or not it's fully true).  

 

So basically, when the grass is thick, I feel like you have to be a little more aggressive and attack the ball for more consistent results, but if the lie is clean, it is easier to use less wrist.  

post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

One thing that I like about the Hinge & Hold is that once you break your wrists back on the take away, you're now locking them per-say. You're then following through with hands forward and the only mental image I had when practicing this shot was focusing on making contact with the ball with the butt of the club passing the ball prior to impact. After time, it became second nature and it was merely a matter of touch and distance control which depended on how far I would need to carry the ball onto the green.

 

I personally think the Hinge and Hold technique eliminates the possibility of hitting the ball with the leading edge of the club, which is really caused by flipping the wrists instead or getting too much movement with the body. Obviously, use whatever works, but I think most people would find that rotating their body brings far too many mechanics and potential mistakes into the mix.

 

I actually found this the complete opposite. I found hinge and hold needed much more of a precise movement. Also, if you don't hold in the hinge and hold, your done, you'll either duff it, or thin it. If you use your body more, take some hands out of it, you don't have to worry much about what your hands are doing. I did hinge and hold for years, and it would probably 50% good, 25% thin, 25% duff shots. This year, switching to more of a Utley style, i had maybe 2 thins in over 50 shots, no duff shots, and i know what i did wrong in the thin, i stoped my lower body and it caused me to flip. As long as i rotate, i hit great chips and pitches. 

 

Yes i agree, if hinge and hold works for you, have at it. I will place my method against hinge and hold anyday, but if you beat me at chipping, more power to yay :b 

post #65 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

 

I actually found this the complete opposite. I found hinge and hold needed much more of a precise movement. Also, if you don't hold in the hinge and hold, your done, you'll either duff it, or thin it. If you use your body more, take some hands out of it, you don't have to worry much about what your hands are doing. I did hinge and hold for years, and it would probably 50% good, 25% thin, 25% duff shots. This year, switching to more of a Utley style, i had maybe 2 thins in over 50 shots, no duff shots, and i know what i did wrong in the thin, i stoped my lower body and it caused me to flip. As long as i rotate, i hit great chips and pitches. 

 

Yes i agree, if hinge and hold works for you, have at it. I will place my method against hinge and hold anyday, but if you beat me at chipping, more power to yay :b 

 

Yes definitely more room for error with the Utley style pitching you're mentioning because you're using the bounce and speed.  Hinge and hold (engaging the leading edge) gives very little room for error.

post #66 of 71
I used used to use the bounce as it was easier for me, but I had way too many times where I would hit it thin and goes flying across the green.

As a beginner, I really didn't understand Phil's hinge and hold - the hold part was that threw me off as I thought there was no release at all. I started using this the last 2 months with a small release right before the ball and I've hit crispier chips / pitches like no other. I now get those bites when I need them too unlike my old method of using the bounce. My short game has improved significantly since I understood the hinge and hold and got away from the bounce method.

As for chipping it when barely on the fringe, I hinge and really do not move my arms at all and just let the weight of the club release it through the ball. You judge distance just like tossing a ball across the green.
post #67 of 71

A friend of mine claims he uses Pelz's technique and typically gets a very odd spin on the ball where his ball will hit the green and jump to the right and roll out forward several inches -- I believe he is generating sidespin on the ball. He has asked me to help him correct it so many times, but I cannot for the life of me get him to stop it. He is a hell of a golfer and holds his own with this unique ball reaction because he can play into it, but I can't even duplicate it when I try.

 

Since we're discussing chipping - 2 questions

1. Can he even rightfully claim this as being Pelz's technique with that odd ball reaction? (I don't think so, but clarifying.)
2. Is there a drill or something that I can recommend to him to prevent this from occurring? The same result applies even when I try to get him to do a hinge and hold method, so I assume it's his path from out to in... but on a chip???

post #68 of 71

Well its not side spin, its basically taking back spin and tilting the axis. 

 

He's probably cutting accross the ball when he chips. 

post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

Well its not side spin, its basically taking back spin and tilting the axis. 

 

He's probably cutting accross the ball when he chips. 

You're right. It just honestly looks like sidespin when he hits it as well. The axis is really tilted. I definitely think he's cutting across the ball as well. No matter how many times I try to explain that it doesn't matter as long as he keeps playing well (he's much better than me), he still wants to achieve that "hit the green and kill it" shot for some reason.

post #70 of 71

Wrist for me. When Phil Mickleson says the hinge and hold method is the best method then you listen to him.

post #71 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post


1. Can he even rightfully claim this as being Pelz's technique with that odd ball reaction? (I don't think so, but clarifying.)

2. Is there a drill or something that I can recommend to him to prevent this from occurring? The same result applies even when I try to get him to do a hinge and hold method, so I assume it's his path from out to in... but on a chip???

I think so. I used to do the same thing, on anything where I opened the face. Because my body was aligned to cut across the ball, I always did. I adjusted to swing inside out (towards the target, instead of cutting across) and fixed the axis tilt and let me land it soft without releasing sideways. Once I started feeling the pitching method Erik and mike advocate, that helped too.
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