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Golf Academy of America vs. Professional Golfers Career College? - Page 3

post #37 of 60

For me, the most interesting thing about this thread is that 14 contributors chose this thread for their 1 and only post.    Did anybody else notice this?

 

When you consider the multiple replies by regular posters, the majority of the comments were made by people with 1 post.  Something smells fishy...LOL

post #38 of 60

I agree.  Keiser University, College of Golf is a great place that provides an accelerated regionally accredited degree.  If you don't know the difference between a regionally accredited institution and a nationally accredited institution, you should do your homework. 

 

Keiser University is located on the east coast and there is National University Golf Academy that has the same accreditation and structure located in San Diego, California.  So, depending on where you want to live and study you would be better off looking into one of these options. 

post #39 of 60

Yes, this is my first post. :-)

 

I was searching the web regarding PGM job placement, came across this thread and decided to comment.

 

This is more for the parents reading this.

 

My son is a PGM sophomore at a PGA accredited university.  The program is long, but along with his Class A card he will also have a B.S. degree.

 

He's talked about golf as a career since he was 12.  As a sophomore in high school he started talking about going the quick way, one of the "golf" academies.  I told him I would not go along with the quick way, I wanted him to have a degree to fall back on.

 

After finals this week, he admited that although the process is not quick, he's definitely glad he's taking the time (and my $$ ha-ha) to do the 4.5 year university route and earn a degree as well.

 

As a father I would also comment I can see he's maturing, taking complete responsibility and becoming an adult.  I feel the college environment is responsible for that (he's 1,200 miles away).   I'd question if the golf academies would have that kind of influence let alone even care.

 

Good Luck and Hit 'Em Straight

post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Glide View Post
 

Yes, this is my first post. :-)

 

I was searching the web regarding PGM job placement, came across this thread and decided to comment.

 

This is more for the parents reading this.

 

My son is a PGM sophomore at a PGA accredited university.  The program is long, but along with his Class A card he will also have a B.S. degree.

 

He's talked about golf as a career since he was 12.  As a sophomore in high school he started talking about going the quick way, one of the "golf" academies.  I told him I would not go along with the quick way, I wanted him to have a degree to fall back on.

 

After finals this week, he admited that although the process is not quick, he's definitely glad he's taking the time (and my $$ ha-ha) to do the 4.5 year university route and earn a degree as well.

 

As a father I would also comment I can see he's maturing, taking complete responsibility and becoming an adult.  I feel the college environment is responsible for that (he's 1,200 miles away).   I'd question if the golf academies would have that kind of influence let alone even care.

 

Good Luck and Hit 'Em Straight

 

Ferris State?

post #41 of 60

No.

My son and I live in Ohio and I didn't think golf work indoors during winter was the best and he quickly agreed, so we looked at the warmer climates.

 

No offense meant, but I would prefer not to start a one university vs the other(s) discussion.  Each is different I'm sure, but they all adhere to PGA requirements.

 

As a side note;  I liked this college after reading their website and how the university and PGM itself were presented, he liked a different one.  After visiting the colleges he decided to apply to this one.  After getting past freshman jitters and being homesick, he began to like where he's at and got to golf almost everyday.

Now he says he can't imagine being anywhere else.

post #42 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Glide View Post
 

No.

My son and I live in Ohio and I didn't think golf work indoors during winter was the best and he quickly agreed, so we looked at the warmer climates.

 

No offense meant, but I would prefer not to start a one university vs the other(s) discussion.  Each is different I'm sure, but they all adhere to PGA requirements.

 

As a side note;  I liked this college after reading their website and how the university and PGM itself were presented, he liked a different one.  After visiting the colleges he decided to apply to this one.  After getting past freshman jitters and being homesick, he began to like where he's at and got to golf almost everyday.

Now he says he can't imagine being anywhere else.

 

No offense taken, as that was not my reason for asking.

 

I just asked because my daughter was in the Ferris PTM program for a year and a half but left when the director left and a new guy came in who wasn't supportive of those who wanted an off-court career and didn't have the kind of industry contacts that the original director had. I think the real important thing is that in both programs students come out with a real degree so if the golf (or tennis) doesn't work out they have a fallback, which was obviously important to you as well.   I hope things work out great for your son.

post #43 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
...  I hope things work out great for your son.

 

Thank You same to you and Happy Holidays

post #44 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Glide View Post
 

... My son and I live in Ohio and I didn't think golf work indoors during winter was the best and he quickly agreed, so we looked at the warmer climates. ...

 

Some of the upper Midwest universities would disagree with you on this point. Both Northwestern and Illinois have built major indoor golf facilities. The coaches are suggesting that you can use the winter months for focused work on the weaker points of your game - something you may miss if you're paying 18 holes a day in warm weather climates.

 

See this interesting WSJ story, How Snowbelt Schools Lure Top Golf Prospects:

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304011304579220140423470258

post #45 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post
 

 

Some of the upper Midwest universities would disagree with you on this point. Both Northwestern and Illinois have built major indoor golf facilities. The coaches are suggesting that you can use the winter months for focused work on the weaker points of your game - something you may miss if you're paying 18 holes a day in warm weather climates.

 

 

And I respectfully disagree with that.

If you're missing "weaker points of your game", because "your playing 18 holes in warmer climate" that's a problem in itself.

Playing indoors certainly can not replicate regular play out on the course.  The dynamic variables simply aren't there.

 

The following relates to my son, YMMV.

He was having some minor swing problems before starting college.  Hours at the driving range just didn't quite suffice.

Once he started playing on a course regularly he was able to work out those issues.  He credits being on the course so often with the improvement.

 

BTW, prior to the PGM program, he really hadn't had professional lessons, we did try one indoor place for a couple of months when he was 15, but that place is a joke and we stopped, in fact, they destroyed his swing.  He went back to working on his own and got his 8 handicap back over that summer.

He's now has a 4 and still improving, so he's getting there.

post #46 of 60

Before you waste your money going to a scummy school like GAA or PGCC, ask to see what kinds of jobs the graduates are getting and how much money they make.

Why spend that much money to get a $15k a year job? You are nothing but a number to those companies. Yes, companies and not schools. They are businesses who report to shareholders who see you as dollar signs. Save the money and just get a job at a golf course. Go to a real college. 

post #47 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by exiteye View Post
 

Before you waste your money going to a scummy school like GAA or PGCC, ask to see what kinds of jobs the graduates are getting and how much money they make.

Why spend that much money to get a $15k a year job? You are nothing but a number to those companies. Yes, companies and not schools. They are businesses who report to shareholders who see you as dollar signs. Save the money and just get a job at a golf course. Go to a real college. 

Quote:
They are businesses who report to shareholders who see you as dollar signs. Save the money and just get a job at a golf course. Go to a real college. 

Amen to that.

 

Quote:
Go to a real college.
 

 

Some great schools on the PGA accredited PGM list:

 

http://pgajobfinder.pgalinks.com/helpwanted/empcenter/pgaandyou/universities.cfm

 

Even the less famous names on there (e.g. Coastal Carolina, Campbell) etc are good, solid, regionally accredited universities. Don't saddle yourself with boatloads of debt to go to a dubious, for-profit school.

post #48 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScouseJohnny View Post
 

Amen to that.

 

 

Some great schools on the PGA accredited PGM list:

 

http://pgajobfinder.pgalinks.com/helpwanted/empcenter/pgaandyou/universities.cfm

 

Even the less famous names on there (e.g. Coastal Carolina, Campbell) etc are good, solid, regionally accredited universities. Don't saddle yourself with boatloads of debt to go to a dubious, for-profit school.

Interesting that out of the whole list of 20 programs only 4 pre-dated the Tiger phenomenon.

post #49 of 60

"Even the less famous names on there (e.g. Coastal Carolina, Campbell) etc are good, solid, regionally accredited universities. Don't saddle yourself with boatloads of debt to go to a dubious, for-profit school."

 

I'd be cautious regardless, do your homework.  Out-of-State tuition almost doubles my son's college tuition costs.

 

We spent 2 weeks just looking at and going over the PGM accredited universities websites and then how their PGM program was presented.  As mentioned, weather was a factor and distance from home was also a factor.

 

That got us down to Coastal Carolina, Florida State, North Carolina State, Florida Gulf Coast (boy did they mess-up the March Madness brackets) and Arizona State (which dropped the PGM program shortly there-after, talk about distance?).

 

Good Luck

post #50 of 60
Quote:
Interesting that out of the whole list of 20 programs only 4 pre-dated the Tiger phenomenon

 

Not questioning the undoubted effect that Tiger Woods has had on the popularity of golf, especially for the Millennial Generation.

 

As regards a correlation between degree programs in golf-related fields and golf's popularity inspired by players of this era - I'm not 100% sure that is the case.

 

More likely just "education inflation," as opposed to anything else. It has had a massive impact on all industries. My old man is a retired Marine Surveyor. He has "A" levels (the British equivalent to a High School Diploma), and learned his profession through a 7 year apprenticeship in a shipyard and part-time classes at "nightschool" (community college classes, more or less) in the 1960s. Nowadays, to have a hope of getting hired in his profession, you'd need at least a Master's degree, plus a plethora of other paper qualifications and certifications.

 

I'm sure the golf industry (especially relating to management) is no different. Rightly or wrongly, the need for a degree is entrenched as a vital part of most professions, these days.


Edited by ScouseJohnny - 1/27/14 at 12:13pm
post #51 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScouseJohnny View Post
 

 

Not questioning the undoubted effect that Tiger Woods has had on the popularity of golf, especially for the Millennial Generation.

 

As regards a correlation between degree programs in golf-related fields and popular players of this era - I'm not 100% sure that is the case.

 

More likely just "education inflation," as opposed to anything else. It has had an impact on all industries. My old man is a retired Marine Surveyor. He has "A" levels (the British equivalent to a High School Diploma), and learned his profession through a 7 year apprenticeship in a shipyard and part-time classes at "nightschool" (community college classes, more or less) in the 1960s. Nowadays, to have a hope of getting hired in his profession, you'd need at least a Master's degree, plus a plethora of other paper qualifications and certifications.

 

I'm sure the golf industry is no different. Rightly or wrongly, the need for a degree is entrenched as a vital part of most professions, these days.

 

I like your term and comments "education inflation", all very true as I see it.

My father quit school to help support his family during the depression.  Yet he worked his way up to Senior R&D Engineer, working for the same company from after WWII until he retired, and with 3 patents to his name.

 

In the business world 99% of the time having a degree is a foregone conclusion.

On the other hand, except for a quick one-liner "he attended...", how often do we hear them discuss a tour player's college let alone any degree.

I guess it's all relative.

post #52 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScouseJohnny View Post
 

 

Not questioning the undoubted effect that Tiger Woods has had on the popularity of golf, especially for the Millennial Generation.

 

As regards a correlation between degree programs in golf-related fields and golf's popularity inspired by players of this era - I'm not 100% sure that is the case.

 

More likely just "education inflation," as opposed to anything else. It has had a massive impact on all industries. My old man is a retired Marine Surveyor. He has "A" levels (the British equivalent to a High School Diploma), and learned his profession through a 7 year apprenticeship in a shipyard and part-time classes at "nightschool" (community college classes, more or less) in the 1960s. Nowadays, to have a hope of getting hired in his profession, you'd need at least a Master's degree, plus a plethora of other paper qualifications and certifications.

 

I'm sure the golf industry (especially relating to management) is no different. Rightly or wrongly, the need for a degree is entrenched as a vital part of most professions, these days.

My daughter started her college career in the Ferris State PTM (professional tennis management) program.  One of the things that was important to us was that if it turned out that she did NOT end up making a career in tennis she still would have a full blown marketing degree that she could use in other fields.  As it turns out she switched to a broader Sports Management program (Bowling Green State U in Ohio) but now works in a marketing position at a high tech company unrelated to sports.  Getting the degree might not be strictly necessary to be a golf (or tennis) pro but it DOES provide alternatives that would not exist in a non-degree golf or tennis or sports program.  

post #53 of 60

Even going to a traditional college without a PGM program would be a better idea than going to a for-profit. Get a part time job at a golf course while attending school, work your way up during the time you're in school and you'll have your 4-year degree and a bunch of experience working in golf. Besides, you don't need any sort of degree to wash carts and clean clubs or press buttons on a register and fold shirts. 

 

If you're not of "college age," really think about what you're getting yourself into. $40k+ debt (tuition + living expenses) to start at the bottom all over again? If you don't have to take out any FAFSA loans and are able to afford it outright, fine (I guess) but know that you're emptying your wallet into the pocket of the wealthy shareholders at the top. They're laughing all the way to the bank. What will you get out of it? Probably some things you didn't know about before, but you could easily learn by working at it on your own, being proactive and networking. If you've worked in another industry, or have had another career before, you probably know the value of networking. Do it on your own(for free), don't pay $40k for that. 

 

Ask around, there are plenty of guys like myself that never went to college for golf that are working in golf courses. And girls.... if you have half a decent golf game, you definitely don't want to go to one of these for-profit circus shows. You can probably just walk in and get hired. 

post #54 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by exiteye View Post
 

Even going to a traditional college without a PGM program would be a better idea than going to a for-profit. Get a part time job at a golf course while attending school, work your way up during the time you're in school and you'll have your 4-year degree and a bunch of experience working in golf. Besides, you don't need any sort of degree to wash carts and clean clubs or press buttons on a register and fold shirts. 

 

The advantage of doing a true PGM thing is that you're a PGA member at the end. No such thing with a regular degree and "working your way up."

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