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Golf Academy of America vs. Professional Golfers Career College? - Page 4

post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

The advantage of doing a true PGM thing is that you're a PGA member at the end. No such thing with a regular degree and "working your way up."

 

True, but I was saying that simply getting a regular degree and working your way up is a better alternative than going to a for-profit. I agree that attending a PGM university is a good idea, not refuting that.

post #56 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by exiteye View Post
 

Before you waste your money going to a scummy school like GAA or PGCC, ask to see what kinds of jobs the graduates are getting and how much money they make.

Why spend that much money to get a $15k a year job? You are nothing but a number to those companies. Yes, companies and not schools. They are businesses who report to shareholders who see you as dollar signs. Save the money and just get a job at a golf course. Go to a real college. 

 


I've wanted to make a comment similar to yours, but hesitated to.

The indoor place I mentioned when my son was 15, he had a nice "20 something" fella as an instructor, but was clueless about the finite elements of golf. His teaching ability was severely lacking and when I pointed out the problems to him, I got a blank stare.  I went to the owner of the place and he was all lip service.

 

Fast Forward to Summer 2013

My son interned at a local country club.  He was showing 8-12 year olds how to hold a club (I hesitate to say he was teaching a class).  He noticed someone off in a corner just watching.

As he walked away, the fella came up and asked "Aren't you the fella I had as a student  at XXXXXX"?  My son recognized him, "Oh yeah".

The fella apologized about how poorly he did and told him "Make sure you tell your Dad, I'm really sorry, that place is a joke".

 

He asked my son what he was doing, and my son told him he was in PGM.

The fella told my son he took the quick way and was sorry he did.  "Now looking back I can see I didn't get the education you're getting and I'm stuck".

post #57 of 75
Hello everyone,
I would like to know some information about the national university golf academy!
What do you think about this university, not in order to become a professional player but to study in this field.
How is the campus in Carlsbad?
Is it a good school?
Thanks
post #58 of 75

PGCC

GAA

Kaiser Golf College

Domestic Student Tuition & Fees: $7200

International Student

$7500

Domestic Student Tuition & Fees

$8,575

International Student

$8,920

Tuition Costs $7,702

Educational & Activity Fees

$1,792

Total Cost  $9,494

Book Costs Not  Included

Books included

Books  not included

Classroom hours 8-12pm

Mon-Fri

Classroom schedule will vary throughout the day

Classroom schedule will vary throughout the day

Golf 7 days a week after 1pm

Golf 18-36 holes/week: class schedule dependant

Golf 18-36 holes/week; class schedule dependant

Lessons starting 1 pm Mon-Fri

 private lesson PGA staff

will vary; class schedule dependant

will vary; class schedule dependant

Range Time 7 days a week

will vary; class schedule dependant

will vary; class schedule dependant

Availability to work part time in the afternoon starting at 1pm

class schedule dependant

class schedule dependant

National Placement Rate 90.1%

Placement % Not advertised

Placement % Not advertised

 

PGCC is also the only golf college that owns and operates it's own golf course in Temecula, Ca.

They hire only our graduates to run the facility. www.thelegendsgc.com

 

Visit both colleges to thoroughly check out the facilities and get a feel for the staff.

 

They are a family run business since 1990. They do not report to shareholders!

post #59 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfin View Post
 

PGCC

GAA

Kaiser Golf College

Domestic Student Tuition & Fees: $7200

International Student

$7500

Domestic Student Tuition & Fees

$8,575

International Student

$8,920

Tuition Costs $7,702

Educational & Activity Fees

$1,792

Total Cost  $9,494

Book Costs Not  Included

Books included

Books  not included

Classroom hours 8-12pm

Mon-Fri

Classroom schedule will vary throughout the day

Classroom schedule will vary throughout the day

Golf 7 days a week after 1pm

Golf 18-36 holes/week: class schedule dependant

Golf 18-36 holes/week; class schedule dependant

Lessons starting 1 pm Mon-Fri

 private lesson PGA staff

will vary; class schedule dependant

will vary; class schedule dependant

Range Time 7 days a week

will vary; class schedule dependant

will vary; class schedule dependant

Availability to work part time in the afternoon starting at 1pm

class schedule dependant

class schedule dependant

National Placement Rate 90.1%

Placement % Not advertised

Placement % Not advertised

 

PGCC is also the only golf college that owns and operates it's own golf course in Temecula, Ca.

They hire only our graduates to run the facility. www.thelegendsgc.com

 

Visit both colleges to thoroughly check out the facilities and get a feel for the staff.

 

They are a family run business since 1990. They do not report to shareholders!

 

So I am a little confused.  In your only two posts on this site you seem to be posing as someone who has checked out these places and are touting PGCC.  But in the part I bolded you talk about "our graduates".  Which makes it seems as if you are affiliated with the one you are touting?  It also seems so since you have all the details about everything for that school and then on the other schools it is all "it depends".  So it is very curious.  

post #60 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
 

 

So I am a little confused.  In your only two posts on this site you seem to be posing as someone who has checked out these places and are touting PGCC.  But in the part I bolded you talk about "our graduates".  Which makes it seems as if you are affiliated with the one you are touting?  It also seems so since you have all the details about everything for that school and then on the other schools it is all "it depends".  So it is very curious.  

 

As I read the post, I began thinking the poster may be a shill.  When I saw "our graduates", I was sure.

post #61 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Glide View Post
 

 

As I read the post, I began thinking the poster may be a shill.  When I saw "our graduates", I was sure.

 

That's what I was thinking also. Now, can he compare his "school" to a legitimate university? I would like to see him try. 

 

All things related to the education aside, many encounters I've had with students from these schools (Golf Academy of America or Pro Golfers Career College) include mentions of rampant drug use and abuse-- students using drugs on campus and on the golf course. I'm sorry, but if my sons or daughter ever wanted to get serious about playing golf or working in this industry, there's no way in he*l I'd let them do it in that kind of atmosphere. Those schools have so few students so your kids would be CONSTANTLY surrounded by it. At least at a traditional college atmosphere, there are more opportunities to NOT be surrounded by rampant drug use. I'm well aware that drugs are everywhere, kids experiment, yada yada yada (heck, even in middle schools) but it seems like at a small academy, it would be more concentrated. If I'm spending $30k+ I want my kids to focus on their golf skills and not whether or not they're going to be able to play after taking bong rips or doing lines in the dorms. I wouldn't be surprised if the schools know about it, but don't do anything about it because it would mean less tuition $$ in their pockets. Shame. 

post #62 of 75

Well after all that...

 

I present this information simply for parents and the soon to be college students as something to consider while looking into a PGM career, your experience may be totally different, I hope it is.

 

My son interned at a private country club for his Sophomore Spring 2014 semester.  The course asked him to stay on as a regular employee for the Summer, so he stayed in Florida.

 

I went and visited my son a couple of weeks ago.  His golf game looked good, but I could sense something was bothering him.

During dinner he asked me "Would you be upset if I changed majors?"   Boy was I shocked.

 

"Dad I just can't see myself doing this for the rest of my life.  The career path to become a club pro is long, the guys I work for aren't making much money, some of the members and their guests are just a pain*, and working 10-12 hours a day got old fast".

 

*He then gave me a few examples, he understands personal interaction can be a pain anytime and anywhere, it's part of life.

I saw one adult guest act like a total jerk because he didn't understand country club policy and then to take out on an employee is unacceptable.

 

When we visited college 3 years ago, we heard more than once that the drop-out rate for PGM is roughly 50%.  I attributed that to the extra golf work involved along with academic work, I now question that.

 

I met a few students and club workers that had already or were thinking about leaving PGM for reasons similar to what my son mentioned.

 

I would like to suggest that perspective students and parents look closely at the downside (that's never mentioned) during their decision process.

 

Good Luck,

post #63 of 75

Some more to add: For guys thinking about going to school to get into the golf industry, here are some regular, public, not for profit community colleges that offer an actual golf management degree that is transferrable to real colleges.

 

http://www.collegeofthedesert.edu/students/ap/Pages/golfmanagement.aspx  in Palm Springs, CA. There has to be over 100 golf courses around the school. 

 

http://www.wwcc.edu/CMSX/main.php?module=department&deptcode=PGM Walla Walla, Washington

 

http://www.sandhills.edu/programs/turf/ Internship at Pinehurst? Not bad at all

 

http://www.scottsdalecc.edu/programs/aas_hospitality-and-tourism-golf-management Scottsdale is a nice golf destination. 

 

http://www.hawkeyecollege.edu/academics/programs/business/golf-course-and-country-club-management/default.aspx?=rotators-homepage Iowa

 

http://www.monroecc.edu/depts/fhtm/golf.htm Golf Mgmt specialization with a hospitality degree

 

http://www.genesee.edu/academics/programs/sports/golf/ Transfers to a long list of 4 year colleges

 

http://www.kirkwood.edu/site/index.php?d=501 Turfgrass degree for those outdoorsy types

post #64 of 75

Good info in your post.  I plan on being a student at one of the Orlando schools after the Navy.  I've done plenty of research on both schools and have friends that have graduated.  I hear the mixed reviews about don't spend your money, or the GAA is only in it for the money.  But the big question I haven't heard anyone talk about is...did you improve your golf game?  I would think that the lessons and learning instruction techniques would be a key factor for everyone.  I'm lucky that after a career in the military that my GI bill will pay for this "luxury" golf training.  I think that either school would greatly enhance one's love of the game...that's my goal and intentions with this program.

post #65 of 75

Update

After I got over the shock of my son wanting to change majors, we talked a great deal about his future direction and plans.  I did NOT push him either way, only he had to make decisions that would effect the rest of his life.

And after discussing it with course management, his profs and some soul-searching, he decided he'd come too far to quit and that he needed to learn to ignore idiots, including one ex-student that was really pushing him to quit the program.  I also understand one of the members he respects talked to him.

So all is OK again.

 

"But the big question I haven't heard anyone talk about is...did you improve your golf game?"

 

There are many sides to the golf "industry", IMO the PGA accredited PGM program isn't about improving your golf score.

To me that's an expensive way to go for a better round of golf and those are my tax dollars you're spending.

 

My son's spring semester  classes are Turf Management, Marketing, Law and Legal issue classes.  That is a lot of work for a lower round.

 

But to answer your question...

When my son started 21/2 years ago he had an 8-10 hdcp, he had good and bad days.  I felt his golf game was too inconsistent.

Now he has a consistent swing, most of the time he's hitting the greens in regulation and 2 putting.  His hdcp is 2-4 now.

So yes his game has improved.

 

Good Luck

post #66 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Glide View Post
 

Update

After I got over the shock of my son wanting to change majors, we talked a great deal about his future direction and plans.  I did NOT push him either way, only he had to make decisions that would effect the rest of his life.

And after discussing it with course management, his profs and some soul-searching, he decided he'd come too far to quit and that he needed to learn to ignore idiots, including one ex-student that was really pushing him to quit the program.  I also understand one of the members he respects talked to him.

So all is OK again.

 

"But the big question I haven't heard anyone talk about is...did you improve your golf game?"

 

There are many sides to the golf "industry", IMO the PGA accredited PGM program isn't about improving your golf score.

To me that's an expensive way to go for a better round of golf and those are my tax dollars you're spending.

 

My son's spring semester  classes are Turf Management, Marketing, Law and Legal issue classes.  That is a lot of work for a lower round.

 

But to answer your question...

When my son started 21/2 years ago he had an 8-10 hdcp, he had good and bad days.  I felt his golf game was too inconsistent.

Now he has a consistent swing, most of the time he's hitting the greens in regulation and 2 putting.  His hdcp is 2-4 now.

So yes his game has improved.

 

Good Luck

I think it's a good idea for your son to get an education from a four year university, because as it's been stated in this thread by numerous people, the training received at either of these schools doesn't do you much good outside the golf business.  But also note that most of the failures out of these schools have been the young students w/ a lack of discipline....just spending daddy's money because they don't know what they want to do w/ their lives.  Kudos to your son if he's got his priorities together.

 

I realize the PGCC and GAA programs are not all about golf lessons, nor is it about earning a tour card, but we are all golfers looking to improve and I found it interesting that no one mentioned the actual golf training/instruction they received.

 

As for spending your tax dollars; I'll have you know that military veterans make up a large percentage of the students at PGCC and GAA and they earned their education benefits for serving our country.  And we pay taxes just like everyone else.  So, next time you see a service member, thank them for their serving and sacrificing so you didn't have to.

post #67 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flynavy View Post
 

I think it's a good idea for your son to get an education from a four year university, because as it's been stated in this thread by numerous people, the training received at either of these schools doesn't do you much good outside the golf business.  But also note that most of the failures out of these schools have been the young students w/ a lack of discipline....just spending daddy's money because they don't know what they want to do w/ their lives.  Kudos to your son if he's got his priorities together.

 

I realize the PGCC and GAA programs are not all about golf lessons, nor is it about earning a tour card, but we are all golfers looking to improve and I found it interesting that no one mentioned the actual golf training/instruction they received.

 

As for spending your tax dollars; I'll have you know that military veterans make up a large percentage of the students at PGCC and GAA and they earned their education benefits for serving our country.  And we pay taxes just like everyone else.  So, next time you see a service member, thank them for their serving and sacrificing so you didn't have to.

 

Yes, he's getting it together, probably just not as quickly as I thought he would. :)

 

I'm from the Nam era so my way of looking at the "Thank a vet" is very different from how they are these days.

 

Vent Mode On

#1 I mean no disrespect to anyone that serves or has served!

Personally I find the "Thank a Vet" as of late a bit too much. Yes those from Nam were treated badly no doubt, but trying to make up for it by over-thanking anyone in uniform is disrespectful to those who served in battle.

A guy a used to work with, was stationed in Minnesota in 1991, never left the country.  After Gulf1 and the Thank a Vet idea, he acted like the world owed him.  Unfortunately I've seen too many stateside's take whatever they can get just because they wore a uniform and that bothers me.

Having said that though, millions have served over the years and most came out, got home and started again.

 

Vent Mode Off

post #68 of 75

Why even waste time, just work on your game pass your PAT and start the PGA program.  Degrees from PGCC and GAA are useless. 

post #69 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmsage View Post
 

Why even waste time, just work on your game pass your PAT and start the PGA program.  Degrees from PGCC and GAA are useless. 


I tend to agree…

post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Glide View Post OT: (Click to show)

Vent Mode On

#1 I mean no disrespect to anyone that serves or has served!

Personally I find the "Thank a Vet" as of late a bit too much. Yes those from Nam were treated badly no doubt, but trying to make up for it by over-thanking anyone in uniform is disrespectful to those who served in battle.

A guy a used to work with, was stationed in Minnesota in 1991, never left the country.  After Gulf1 and the Thank a Vet idea, he acted like the world owed him.  Unfortunately I've seen too many stateside's take whatever they can get just because they wore a uniform and that bothers me.

Having said that though, millions have served over the years and most came out, got home and started again.

 

Vent Mode Off

 

 

 

 

OT: (Click to show)
I look it as he would have gone if he had been assigned.  He was vulnerable and available.  That is more than enough, for me, to thank him.  I thank them for putting their lives on hold and making themselves available to possible face danger, not for the actual facing of danger.  So long as the guy you worked with didn't claim to have done things he didn't do I don't see the problem. 
post #71 of 75

FYI:
I know several graduates of the Golf Academy and they do not speak well of it.  They are now older college students attempting to acquire a "serviceable" education.   While one, a Navy Vet,  does have a job as a Golf Club teaching pro, he says that generally, the PGA certified programs lead to better career prospects and he was left with some 30 thousand dollars of debt!

 

He also says that he would definitely not do it again and feels that he essentially wasted precious GI Bill Education money.

 

I am only relating what I have been told by those who have attended .....the post regarding the PGA certified programs with its formality and apparent religiosity sounds "creepy" indeed.

 

You might also do well to remember that the golf business in general, is in steep decline these days. Most notable evidence to this effect is the recent layoff of over 500 PGA certified pros at Dick's Sporting Goods stores, nation-wide.

 

Bottom line:  a casual perusal of the economic landscape provides ample evidence that the middle class is a rapidly vanishing species- having been outsourced for several decades now.  These are/ were the people who had both the time and money to pursue golf.  Golf's decline is but a kind of "canary in the coal mine" indicator of the loss of good paying, middle class jobs nation wide. Those jobs are highly unlikely to ever return.

That said I would suggest that you think twice and three times before investing so much time and money into a career in golf.

 

At the very least I would urge due diligence and suggest that you speak with graduates of ALL these programs in order to acquire first hand knowledge of their experiences and their career paths. You should also speak extensively with club pros and other golf course management employees and learn as much as possible about their jobs and career prospects, etc. This will not only provide a more comprehensive understanding of the field but also help you to develop a valuable professional network.

 

Best wishes in your career search.....may you find the path that brings you the most happiness.   :)

post #72 of 75

 

But to answer your question...

When my son started 21/2 years ago he had an 8-10 hdcp, he had good and bad days.  I felt his golf game was too inconsistent.

Now he has a consistent swing, most of the time he's hitting the greens in regulation and 2 putting.  His hdcp is 2-4 now.

So yes his game has improved.

 

Good Luck

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmsage View Post
 

Why even waste time, just work on your game pass your PAT and start the PGA program.  Degrees from PGCC and GAA are useless.

@ jmsage: easier said than done.  How many of us have been stuck at the same handicap for 10 or 20 years.  Many of us have an eye for fixing others, but I find the hardest part of improving is working on your own game; you many know what's wrong, but fixing it and getting better takes quality instruction and practice...which can be gained at these academies.

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