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Do golf shoes really need spikes? - Page 4

post #55 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post



Because golf shoes cost money. Spikes cost money. Money doesn't grow on trees.


That's like saying "Why shouldn't you use a $500 driver if 99% of golfers use one?"


I'm sure they're freakin' great. I wear tennis shoes. I don't slip. 

Comparing a $500 club to a $50 shoe is not a fair comparison. You don't have to be a pro to realize the advantage of a properly anchored foot, and even a pro won't risk not being anchored. But I would bet, nay, I know that a pro could hit well with a $200 driver whereas the difference for us using a $500 club might actually be detrimental.

Your comparison is more like saying just because professional car racers wear seatbelts....

As for not slipping wearing tennis shoes, I reiterate what I said before: an 8 cylinder car can run on 6, but not with full power efficiency. If you are not slipping, then you are not properly loading up on your downswing and you're not following through with maximum power delivery.
post #56 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaggerSA View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post



Because golf shoes cost money. Spikes cost money. Money doesn't grow on trees.


That's like saying "Why shouldn't you use a $500 driver if 99% of golfers use one?"


I'm sure they're freakin' great. I wear tennis shoes. I don't slip. 

Comparing a $500 club to a $50 shoe is not a fair comparison. You don't have to be a pro to realize the advantage of a properly anchored foot, and even a pro won't risk not being anchored. But I would bet, nay, I know that a pro could hit well with a $200 driver whereas the difference for us using a $500 club might actually be detrimental.

Your comparison is more like saying just because professional car racers wear seatbelts....

As for not slipping wearing tennis shoes, I reiterate what I said before: an 8 cylinder car can run on 6, but not with full power efficiency. If you are not slipping, then you are not properly loading up on your downswing and you're not following through with maximum power delivery.

 

I've shot 73 with my minimal power delivery.  Come back and tell me all about when you can say the same.  You don't need to swing for the fence to play good golf.

post #57 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaggerSA View Post


Comparing a $500 club to a $50 shoe is not a fair comparison. You don't have to be a pro to realize the advantage of a properly anchored foot, and even a pro won't risk not being anchored. But I would bet, nay, I know that a pro could hit well with a $200 driver whereas the difference for us using a $500 club might actually be detrimental.

Your comparison is more like saying just because professional car racers wear seatbelts....

As for not slipping wearing tennis shoes, I reiterate what I said before: an 8 cylinder car can run on 6, but not with full power efficiency. If you are not slipping, then you are not properly loading up on your downswing and you're not following through with maximum power delivery.

A heck of a lot of pros these days where golf shoes that are a lot closer to tennis shoes, traction wise, than they are to golf spikes.  Off the top of my head, Fred Couples, Ernie Els, Justin Rose.

 

If you are unstable in tennis shoes, you might either just be playing really wet courses, or you are swinging too hard.

post #58 of 110

The shoes back when I started hurt bad. Had to tape my ankles and they had no padding in the bottom. I finished a lot of rounds barefoot (don't recommend due to course chemicals). Nowadays a new comfortable pair of shoes can be bought for $40 (half that used). My last round I walked and carried with no problems. Thirty years ago my feet would have been in agony. I do agree with the person who said if you stay within yourself tennies are fine too. Also agree with the person who said golf shoes are waterproof and that is a big plus and after you get your first soaker you realize how much so.

post #59 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

A heck of a lot of pros these days where golf shoes that are a lot closer to tennis shoes, traction wise, than they are to golf spikes.  Off the top of my head, Fred Couples, Ernie Els, Justin Rose.

 

If you are unstable in tennis shoes, you might either just be playing really wet courses, or you are swinging too hard.

They may look like tennis shoes, but the rubber spikes do a decent job of keeping you grounded, especially compared to flat bottom tennis shoes.  If you can maintain your stance on hills and in rain then you're right, golf shoes aren't necessary.  I don't swing out of my shoes, but I like knowing that my lead foot is planted on my downswing. 

post #60 of 110

Golf shoes are equipment.  Only an ignorant or woefully uninformed or inexperienced person would argue to the contrary.  In a game where the through swing starts from the ground up, in a dynamic swing, there is a lot of force and stress going through the feet, ankles and legs.  If not for performance sake, I would at least like to have the best possible shoes on my feet to prevent injury through slipping.  Can anyone imagine an athlete in any other ball sport playing without the best possible shoes? It's foolish at best. Enough said. 

post #61 of 110

Softspikes > new spikeless gumby shoes

post #62 of 110

I can answer that question- the older I get - the more I realize that the advantage of balance that was afforded me in my youth when I would play barefoot. As a caddie at the local country club, my game was so good that many of the college age members would pit me against some of their friends in dollar dollar dollar games using someone else'e clubs when I did not have time to go home and get mine.- We would either play 3 or 5 holes and I generally would win against the hoy piloy  members when I was not a member.

 

The local pro had taught me the value of balance and tempo in the swing for consistency.

 

He also taught the value of footwork like dancing and playing barefoot accentuated this.

 

I believe the new shoes with multiple nipples on the sole provide the advantages I mention above.

 

Shoes need some anchoring but the day of spikes is going like they have in football and baseball.

 

signed 

 

a 70 year old 4 handicap (white tees) who grew up as a caddie

 

those were the days

post #63 of 110

Succinctly and well said.  You don't NEED golf shoes to play golf. Once you can afford some, buy some.  Golf can be played and enjoyed on the cheap for strictly recreational purposes. 

 

The person who started this is probably a novice but he has gotten a golf bug and he/she is frustrated or put off by its potential cost. Passionate, too.  Let's cut him some slack, myself included after some reflection.  Get a handicap; learn how to compete; and, along the way, as you improve and (want to) become a better player you will learn why the better players do certain things that are not immediately obvious.  Entry level golf shoes are not expensive; check out ebay.com, too.

 

For my own, I started golf in tennis shoes, then borrowed my Dad's used golf shoes, then bought a cheap pair of Hush Puppies with cleats (showing my age), then bought a decent pair of golf shoes, then bought my first Foot Joys.  Glorious.  Along the way I also endured blisters, sore feet, slippage, a burst bursa-sac in my heel, and the inability on occasion to stay stable and fully balanced for a good, hard swing and better scoring -all owing at least in part to shoes that were not well-suited to the game.  How does one know before one tees off what the course conditions are going to be that day or where your errant shots will land - dry, high or tight lies, wet, slopes, next to or in hazards, ... on and on.  Many, many golfers are athletes, some gifted more than others; most of the good ones are "athletic" with good to great hand eye coordination and balance, no matter what their physical appearances. I think that on a given day I could shoot in the 70's in tennis shoes but why would I want to risk the enjoyment of the game over $50 to $200 invested for several seasons of play and many, many greens fees and hours of enjoyment.  

 

metrybill  

post #64 of 110

You said it, "youth." 

post #65 of 110
Quote:

Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

 

Golf isn't an inexpensive hobby

 

Spoken like an extremely privileged individual.

Are you kidding me?

$50 is a lot of money for many people. For me, it's at least two rounds of golf. And premium balls? What are those?

There are FEW sports that requre the same level of investment for equipment and access fees as golf. Ice hockey and Equestrian come to mind...

post #66 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaggerSA View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post



Because golf shoes cost money. Spikes cost money. Money doesn't grow on trees.


That's like saying "Why shouldn't you use a $500 driver if 99% of golfers use one?"


I'm sure they're freakin' great. I wear tennis shoes. I don't slip. 

Comparing a $500 club to a $50 shoe is not a fair comparison. You don't have to be a pro to realize the advantage of a properly anchored foot, and even a pro won't risk not being anchored. But I would bet, nay, I know that a pro could hit well with a $200 driver whereas the difference for us using a $500 club might actually be detrimental.

Your comparison is more like saying just because professional car racers wear seatbelts....

As for not slipping wearing tennis shoes, I reiterate what I said before: an 8 cylinder car can run on 6, but not with full power efficiency. If you are not slipping, then you are not properly loading up on your downswing and you're not following through with maximum power delivery.


So now you know about my golf swing.... right....

I think this conversation ended with that careless assumption.

post #67 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post

 

Spoken like an extremely privileged individual.

Are you kidding me?

$50 is a lot of money for many people. For me, it's at least two rounds of golf. And premium balls? What are those?

There are FEW sports that requre the same level of investment for equipment and access fees as golf. Ice hockey and Equestrian come to mind...

Did you read my quote or see what you wanted to see?  "Golf isn't an Inexpensive hobby".   How does that come off as privileged?  I personally don't care if you golf in bare feet.  Don't ask questions if you can't handle honest responses. 

post #68 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post

 

Spoken like an extremely privileged individual.

Are you kidding me?

$50 is a lot of money for many people. For me, it's at least two rounds of golf. And premium balls? What are those?

There are FEW sports that requre the same level of investment for equipment and access fees as golf. Ice hockey and Equestrian come to mind...

Did you read my quote or see what you wanted to see?  "Golf isn't an Inexpensive hobby".   How does that come off as privileged?  I personally don't care if you golf in bare feet.  Don't ask questions if you can't handle honest responses. 

 

It's reading comprehension that was lacking there.  Probably had trouble with the double negative.  a2_wink.gif

post #69 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

It's reading comprehension that was lacking there.  Probably had trouble with the double negative.  a2_wink.gif

I saw that last night and was going to point it out to Walkthecourse but I forgot.

Lol, nothing like flying off the handle because you misread something. a1_smile.gif
post #70 of 110
1. I don't need to know your golf swing. I know physics. You cannot break the laws of physics. period.

2. Clubs, green fees, bag, balls.... and you want to save the equivalent of about 3 dozen balls by eliminating the proper footwear. Sorry. I don't follow that rationale at all. Do you wear gloves? You could defy physics there too and save another $10.
post #71 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaggerSA View Post

Do you wear gloves? You could defy physics there too and save another $10.

Wait, what does that have to do with anything?  Bad comparison.

 

There are not a lot of people out there who take golf seriously and play in sneakers, I'll give you that ... but there are a heck of a lot of good golfers out there who don't wear gloves.

 

Or do you think that Fred Couples was worried about $10 all this time?

post #72 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Or do you think that Fred Couples was worried about $10 all this time?

 

Stop making sense!

 

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