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I bought a road bike! - Page 7

post #109 of 131
SRAM Rival shifters. SRAM Apex brakes. BB30 bottom bracket.
post #110 of 131

Obligatory garage door photo:

 

 

post #111 of 131
Thread Starter 

grrrr. Its been just over a month now since my inception into the "I broke my collarbone cycling" club. I see you guys here and my friends on Strava, the weather is perfect out in here SoCal right now. And just to rub it in, I've received two jerseys in the mail that I ordered before the crash. I want back on dangit!!

 

Sep 2nd

 

 

Sep 10th

 

post #112 of 131
Ouch!
Rode a Metric century yesterday. 3rd one in the past two years plus one real century :)
post #113 of 131

I've recently joined the ranks of road bike ownership.    Many years ago I used to be heavily into cycling and raced a bit, but after a nearly three decade layoff I've decided I needed to get in better shape.   I think getting winded walking downstairs was the clue!

 

This weekend I picked up a nice Trek 4.6 on a great sale:

 

I did my first ride on it yesterday and was astonished how badly out of shape I really am.   I live in a hilly neighborhood and was gasping for air after less than a mile.    I guess it will be quite a while before I can call myself a cyclist again!     Or course I'll have to start getting more familiar with all the new cycling terms, like EPO, PED, hGH, CERA, etc........

post #114 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

I've recently joined the ranks of road bike ownership.    Many years ago I used to be heavily into cycling and raced a bit, but after a nearly three decade layoff I've decided I needed to get in better shape.   I think getting winded walking downstairs was the clue!

This weekend I picked up a nice Trek 4.6 on a great sale:



I did my first ride on it yesterday and was astonished how badly out of shape I really am.   I live in a hilly neighborhood and was gasping for air after less than a mile.    I guess it will be quite a while before I can call myself a cyclist again!     Or course I'll have to start getting more familiar with all the new cycling terms, like EPO, PED, hGH, CERA, etc........

Nice ride! I'm a Cannondale guy, but Trek makes a great bike. Like golf, cycling technology has changed a LOT in the last 30 years!

Great for core strength in addition to the obvious lower body benefits.

Time to put in some miles....and a great time of year to do it!
post #115 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


Nice ride! I'm a Cannondale guy, but Trek makes a great bike. Like golf, cycling technology has changed a LOT in the last 30 years!
 

 

Thanks.  I was torn between the Cannondale and Trek, but the great price picking up a 2012 Trek won me over.  

 

Boy, you're not kidding about the technology changes over the last 30 years!    My last bike was pretty much top of the line for the time:   Ciocc frame with Columbus SL tubing, all Campy Super Record groupset, shifters on the downtube, top end Mavic wheels, and silk sew-up tires.    I cherry picked the best components in every category and built it myself  (even lacing the wheels) - I used to manage a bike shop in college so I still had the wholesale connections for parts and the bike building skills.   It was about as high end as one could do, and I had about $1300 into it.     It weighed about 19 lbs and handled great for tight racing but wasn't real comfortable in the bumpier stuff.  

 

Now even the lowest end groupsets probably are lighter than that old Super Record set, and they perform great.    10 or 11 cogs are on the rear, where the state of the art with the prior bike was squeezing 6 on the rear hub.    The whole concept of having shifters built into the brake levers is great, and it's amazing how responsive and snappy they are even with the extra cable length and mechanisms needed.    The use of carbon fiber in the frames and a lot of components is certainly one of the more observable changes, but I found that even steel and aluminum frames were much higher tech than previously; I imagine the use of finite element analysis has enabled much stronger structures even with the old materials.    The frames are much lighter, and have amazing stiffness in the drivetrain yet still manage to offer some compliance in their ride.   

 

I've promised myself that I'm going to stop browsing the cycling component sites and stay satisfied with what I have.   Cycling is a sport where the equipment freak inside one's head can really go nuts, so some serious willpower is needed.    I know that I bought a bike that is way more capable than I'll ever be, so there isn't any need to start tweaking and upgrading.    At least that's what I'm telling myself this week.......

post #116 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post



I've promised myself that I'm going to stop browsing the cycling component sites and stay satisfied with what I have.   Cycling is a sport where the equipment freak inside one's head can really go nuts, so some serious willpower is needed.    I know that I bought a bike that is way more capable than I'll ever be, so there isn't any need to start tweaking and upgrading.    At least that's what I'm telling myself this week.......

You just keep telling yourself that....... a2_wink.gif
post #117 of 131

sorry about your accident, but bicycling is dangerous.  I used to ride 3 to 4 days a week averaging 25 to 35 miles each, then three years ago I started playing golf after a very long layoff.  Soon I was playing golf 3 to 4 days a week and the bike one day, then bike one day a year, then puff.  Both sports require a lot of time.  And I'm retired.  Don't know how anyone can find time to do both and work too.

 

Have you found this forum:http://www.bikeforums.net

post #118 of 131

 

Just picked this up last week.  GT Series 5.  Upgraded shifters, crankset, rear derailleur to Ultegra, front derailleur is Tiagara, brakes are 105.  Wheel are Shimano, tires are maxxis.  Can't wait for the weather to get warm!!

post #119 of 131

Sharp looking bike!    Good equipment combo as well - great performance for the value.

 

I've had my bike a whopping week now, and have gotten out for 4 rides.   The first one I did was around the streets in my immediate neighborhood, and right off it started with a pretty severe hill and then another fairly steep grade back to my house.  The ride was only about 2 miles, but I literally couldn't finish the last hill, I was so out of shape.  But hey, that's why I bought it!     A couple other rides were at a nearby lake where it is fairly flat (but windy), and I did a nice 10 miles on each ride, with the second time noticeably faster than the first.   Yesterday I did another ride in my neighborhood but up into the hills nearby,  with one long steep hill and then a lot of slight grades, and I managed about 8 miles pushing it pretty hard.     It's only been a week, but I am feeling better already, although I'm pretty sure at 54 I'm not going to be getting in racing shape any time soon.   

 

One thing I need to do is get a better saddle.    The reviews on the Trek I bought were all fantastic except everyone complained about the seat, and I see what they mean - it is literally a pain in the butt.   I think an investment in something really good like a Cobb will be worth every penny.   

post #120 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

Sharp looking bike!    Good equipment combo as well - great performance for the value.

 

I've had my bike a whopping week now, and have gotten out for 4 rides.   The first one I did was around the streets in my immediate neighborhood, and right off it started with a pretty severe hill and then another fairly steep grade back to my house.  The ride was only about 2 miles, but I literally couldn't finish the last hill, I was so out of shape.  But hey, that's why I bought it!     A couple other rides were at a nearby lake where it is fairly flat (but windy), and I did a nice 10 miles on each ride, with the second time noticeably faster than the first.   Yesterday I did another ride in my neighborhood but up into the hills nearby,  with one long steep hill and then a lot of slight grades, and I managed about 8 miles pushing it pretty hard.     It's only been a week, but I am feeling better already, although I'm pretty sure at 54 I'm not going to be getting in racing shape any time soon.   

 

One thing I need to do is get a better saddle.    The reviews on the Trek I bought were all fantastic except everyone complained about the seat, and I see what they mean - it is literally a pain in the butt.   I think an investment in something really good like a Cobb will be worth every penny.   

 

 

It ain't the saddle......it's the lack of time in the saddle!  a2_wink.gif

 

BTW, you'll be surprised at how your conditioning will come back.  I'm 54 too and my wife and I both compete in triathlons.  I'm not in the shape I was when I was 25, but I'm still in better shape than a lot of guys who are 25.  I'm guessing that you will be too, sooner than you think! 

post #121 of 131

Sweet rides!

 

I had to retuire from competition some 12 years ago......shattered my left wrist while ice skating.....They put an inch of my hip, a metal plate and 13 screws in it.

 

My wife is afraid if I ride, I may have an accident...and if i did, my left wrist and hand would be rendered useless!

 

So I retired.....I used to compete in Road Races & Criteriums in Florida.......Came in 4th in Masters class for Criterium in state championship in the '90's.

 

Just lookin' at your rides gives me goosebumps.

post #122 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
It ain't the saddle......it's the lack of time in the saddle!  a2_wink.gif

 

BTW, you'll be surprised at how your conditioning will come back.  I'm 54 too and my wife and I both compete in triathlons.  I'm not in the shape I was when I was 25, but I'm still in better shape than a lot of guys who are 25.  I'm guessing that you will be too, sooner than you think! 

 

Yeah, I know that I've got to log some hours to build up the saddle tolerance again (i.e. butt calluses).   But my stock saddle IS pretty bad and just doesn't fit my sit bones very well.     I did pick up a Cobb today to try, and even just sitting on it in the garage I can tell it is a much better alignment with my pressure points.   

 

And thanks for the encouragement about getting back into shape.      I'm not obese or anything, and at 6' 2" and 180lbs most people think I'm fairly slim, but I have a thin frame and know that I'd be better at around 170lbs with the weight a bit better distributed, i.e. less gut and more muscle.     It's funny that while riding around my mind is thinking of how riding will help golf.   When I used to ride I'd grit it out on a climb thinking it was making my legs stronger for climbing and time trials, but now I'm as my legs are burning I'm thinking that I'll be gaining some yards off the tee and walking up that steep hill on the 13th at Torrey Pines won't be as difficult!   Different motivation and priorities now.....

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozcycle View Post

So I retired.....I used to compete in Road Races & Criteriums in Florida.......Came in 4th in Masters class for Criterium in state championship in the '90's.

 

 

That's pretty impressive - that's a pretty competitive category in a tough format to race in.    

 

I used to race in high school and a bit in college, and made it to Cat 2.    But that isn't as impressive as it sounds.     I lived in northern Idaho when I first got my racing license and normally the entry level is Cat 4, but due to a shortage in Cat 3 riders in that region the authorities were randomly handing out Cat 3 to some new people like me.     They also had a rule then (don't know if they still do) that if you place in top 3 of 3 races or top 6 of 6 races you automatically got bumped up a category.       So in my illustrious racing career I was in a number of races where they only had 3 or 4 riders in that level, so by placing near last in a half dozen races I was automatically pushed up to Cat 2.    I went from being fairly uncompetitive to totally embarrassed!       I imagine if I stuck it out a little longer I would have been Cat 1 just by finishing another half dozen races, even if I was two hours behind the leader on a 60 mile race.       

post #123 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozcycle View Post

Sweet rides!

I had to retuire from competition some 12 years ago......shattered my left wrist while ice skating.....They put an inch of my hip, a metal plate and 13 screws in it.

My wife is afraid if I ride, I may have an accident...and if i did, my left wrist and hand would be rendered useless!

So I retired.....I used to compete in Road Races & Criteriums in Florida.......Came in 4th in Masters class for Criterium in state championship in the '90's.

Just lookin' at your rides gives me goosebumps.

Criteriums are a blast.....to watch.

I don't have a pair of huevos big enough to actually get out there and mix it up with you guys!
post #124 of 131

 

I could not take it any longer.  I had to get out.  Cold ride, but it felt good to get the heart rate up.  As you can see in the background, no golf in the near future.

post #125 of 131
Quote:

Originally Posted by 14ledo81 View Post
 

 

 

 

I could not take it any longer.  I had to get out.  Cold ride, but it felt good to get the heart rate up.  As you can see in the background, no golf in the near future.

 

That's double tough!   23mm ain't much grip in the snow!   

 

Good on ya!   c2_beer.gif

post #126 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by 14ledo81 View Post

 

 

 

On the plus side, whenever you want to stop for a minute there is a ready-made bike rack right by the side of the road!

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