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The Dan Plan - 10,000 Hours to become a pro golfer - Page 60

post #1063 of 1896
Quote:

Next year? Dude. Ya need to throw yourself into the fire as much as possible to learn to deal with pressure situations. The 10K hypothesis doesn't cover keeping your head together when you tighten up.
post #1064 of 1896

As Ben Hogan liked to say, "golf and tournament golf are as different as tennis and ice hockey".

 

Looks like three blowups cost Dan. If he just limits the damage to bogey on #6, #13, and #15, he makes the cut.

post #1065 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by acerimusdux View Post

As Ben Hogan liked to say, "golf and tournament golf are as different as tennis and ice hockey".

Looks like three blowups cost Dan. If he just limits the damage to bogey on #6, #13, and #15, he makes the cut.

Agree, some good things on that card. Birdies on 1 and 10 and a real nice recovery after the triple on 6 for 6-hole one under run.

Looks a lot like something I would do. But then, I suck, I'm struggling to get my index back under 6, and have no aspirations towards the PGA Tour.
post #1066 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post


Next year? Dude. Ya need to throw yourself into the fire as much as possible to learn to deal with pressure situations. The 10K hypothesis doesn't cover keeping your head together when you tighten up.

I was thinking the same thing. I hope his next tournament isn't next year.

post #1067 of 1896

I think Dan is sadly mistaken if he thinks he "learned his lesson". That hasn't happened yet. It's also not a matter of saying "I flopped, so I'll try again next year because I need more work". If he's able to financially gain tournament experience early on, I think it's all the better for his long-term goal. If you take a fresh shot at tournaments on an annual basis because you flopped, each time you enter you'll be putting more pressure on yourself. It would be impossible not to think something along the lines of "Okay, I sucked last year and did this, this and this wrong. This year, I should be able to do this, this and this". The ball lies in an unfavorable position and you immediately reflect on your last tournament experience, pressure mounts and you start working to minimize failure - rather than thinking about success.

If finances are available, keep moving forward and try again. Several people I know who play in Ohio Pro-Ams, Locals and Regions have told me they were not comfortable playing in tournaments until they had about 3 or 4 under their belt. At that point, they knew the "flow" of the event and what to expect, where to go, what to do, playing under pressure/with small galleries, etc. I say get the nerves under control as early as possible through more tournaments. No pain, no gain.

post #1068 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

I think Dan is sadly mistaken if he thinks he "learned his lesson". That hasn't happened yet. It's also not a matter of saying "I flopped, so I'll try again next year because I need more work". If he's able to financially gain tournament experience early on, I think it's all the better for his long-term goal. If you take a fresh shot at tournaments on an annual basis because you flopped, each time you enter you'll be putting more pressure on yourself. It would be impossible not to think something along the lines of "Okay, I sucked last year and did this, this and this wrong. This year, I should be able to do this, this and this". The ball lies in an unfavorable position and you immediately reflect on your last tournament experience, pressure mounts and you start working to minimize failure - rather than thinking about success.


If finances are available, keep moving forward and try again. Several people I know who play in Ohio Pro-Ams, Locals and Regions have told me they were not comfortable playing in tournaments until they had about 3 or 4 under their belt. At that point, they knew the "flow" of the event and what to expect, where to go, what to do, playing under pressure/with small galleries, etc. I say get the nerves under control as early as possible through more tournaments. No pain, no gain.

In his blog he cites financial concerns as a reason for not playing more tournaments, but that's pure bull. He could play club tournaments and any number of lower level amateur tournaments for not much more than the cost of the golf itself. A quick look on-line shows that the Oregon Golf Association runs an amatuer tour with tournaments every couple of weeks. Entry fees, including the golf run around $75.

I'm beginning to think that he doesn't want to put his game out there where, like yesterday, he knows that he can't hide from the results.
post #1069 of 1896

One thing I always found strange, was the lack of rounds Dan posts towards his handicap. I can see when he was just learning the game but now I just find it odd. If golf was my job I would be posting rounds every few days.

post #1070 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

In his blog he cites financial concerns as a reason for not playing more tournaments, but that's pure bull. He could play club tournaments and any number of lower level amateur tournaments for not much more than the cost of the golf itself. A quick look on-line shows that the Oregon Golf Association runs an amatuer tour with tournaments every couple of weeks. Entry fees, including the golf run around $75.

 

Has anyone pointed this out to him publicly?

post #1071 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by acerimusdux View Post

As Ben Hogan liked to say, "golf and tournament golf are as different as tennis and ice hockey".

Looks like three blowups cost Dan. If he just limits the damage to bogey on #6, #13, and #15, he makes the cut.

This is a little like saying, if only I didn't pull my tee shot I could have parred the hole.

You can't train nerves. It's part of your personality. You either play the same under "pressure" as you do a casual round or not.

I agree that mood/anger also has a lot to do with score, which you can train to some degree, but nerves are built into your genetic code.

Dan does not look like a hothead to me, and the blowup holes happened randomly, not at the end.
post #1072 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

You can't train nerves. It's part of your personality.

 

I don't agree with that at all.

 

I think some people are better able to handle pressure (I've never really had any problems), but to say you can't train them? Nah.

post #1073 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


You can't train nerves. It's part of your personality. You either play the same under "pressure" as you do a casual round or not.

Totally disagree with this statement.  It's quite normal to be less and less nervous, and more and more comfortable, as you do something more often.

 

First date, first day of school, first day of new job, first tryout for golf team, first amateur tournament, etc, etc, are all going to be making most, if not all, people a lot more nervous than the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th etc, etc. of each activity.

 

You absolutely can "train" nerves.

 

EDIT:  Sorry Erik beat me to it. (by 9 seconds) :-P

post #1074 of 1896
I'm pulling for the guy, I just think he set his sights too high. If I remember correctly, Gladwell says that 10,000 hours makes one an expert. A touring pro is top .01% of golfers, far more than expert. I'd say under 3 cap with 4000 hours left is proving out the theory.

He will probably get to scratch which I believe one could reasonably say is expert status. But, he has no chance to become a touring pro.
post #1075 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Totally disagree with this statement.  It's quite normal to be less and less nervous, and more and more comfortable, as you do something more often.

 

First date, first day of school, first day of new job, first tryout for golf team, first amateur tournament, etc, etc, are all going to be making most, if not all, people a lot more nervous than the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th etc, etc. of each activity.

 

You absolutely can "train" nerves.

 

EDIT:  Sorry Erik beat me to it. (by 9 seconds) :-P

@Golfingdad is 100% right, nerves come most into play because someone is unfamiliar with a certain situation or not prepared.  Public speaking is a great example.  I remember how uncomfortable and nervous I was the first time I had to do a presentation in front of my class.  Over my career I've been forced to present quite frequently and at this point in my life I don't even think twice about getting up in front of a room of people to give a speech or presentation.

 

IMO Dan is a vanity capper, maybe it's not intentional, but he certainly isn't able to perform to his handicap when he's playing under tournament conditions.   In fairness to the guy, he's not only facing the pressure we'd all face of playing in a tournament but also has to deal with knowing that his scores will be ripped apart by all his naysayers that follow him.   If Dan is going to get past this he will need a lot more tournament play and will likely have to take some lumps until his tournament performance gets closer to his published handicap.

post #1076 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post

I'm pulling for the guy, I just think he set his sights too high. If I remember correctly, Gladwell says that 10,000 hours makes one an expert. A touring pro is top .01% of golfers, far more than expert. I'd say under 3 cap with 4000 hours left is proving out the theory.

He will probably get to scratch which I believe one could reasonably say is expert status. But, he has no chance to become a touring pro.

I'm neither pulling for him, nor rooting against him. Just following his progress with interest, more for the entertainment aspect than anything. But it's worth noting that in order to validate that hcp, he needs to play more tournaments where his scores can be independently verified and he's subject to some pressure not found in a casual round with a buddy or two.

An 11.0 differential in a local amateur tournament may not invalidate his current handicap, but it certainly doesn't go far towards supporting it.
post #1077 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

I'm neither pulling for him, nor rooting against him. Just following his progress with interest, more for the entertainment aspect than anything. But it's worth noting that in order to validate that hcp, he needs to play more tournaments where his scores can be independently verified and he's subject to some pressure not found in a casual round with a buddy or two.

An 11.0 differential in a local amateur tournament may not invalidate his current handicap, but it certainly doesn't go far towards supporting it.

Agreed, I'm taking him at his word but results in the tourney obfuscate the 2.8 fer sure.
post #1078 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

I don't agree with that at all.

I think some people are better able to handle pressure (I've never really had any problems), but to say you can't train them? Nah.
Sure, the way you phrased it, I have to completely agree with you.
post #1079 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

@Golfingdad is 100% right, nerves come most into play because someone is unfamiliar with a certain situation or not prepared.  Public speaking is a great example.  I remember how uncomfortable and nervous I was the first time I had to do a presentation in front of my class.  Over my career I've been forced to present quite frequently and at this point in my life I don't even think twice about getting up in front of a room of people to give a speech or presentation.

Funny.  As I finished reading your first sentence I thought to myself, "Ooh, another good example would be public speaking."  :-P  So obviously, I totally agree.  Familiarity and preparedness both go a long way to help you "train" your nerves.

post #1080 of 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post

I'm pulling for the guy, I just think he set his sights too high. If I remember correctly, Gladwell says that 10,000 hours makes one an expert. A touring pro is top .01% of golfers, far more than expert. I'd say under 3 cap with 4000 hours left is proving out the theory.

He will probably get to scratch which I believe one could reasonably say is expert status. But, he has no chance to become a touring pro.

Apparently Dan did not read the fine print.  Gladwell's own quote, "There is a lot of confusion about the 10,000 rule that I talk about in Outliers. It doesn't apply to sports."

 

source:  http://www.businessinsider.com/malcolm-gladwell-explains-the-10000-hour-rule-2014-6

 

I take Dan's effort as nothing more than his own publicity building.  Good for him if he can build his publicity but bad if he actually believes he can become an "expert" or "pro" in golf.  Also let's not lower the standard of expert.  Scratch is definitely not an expert in golf as Gladwell's examples focus on really really exceptional larger-than life human beings.  Expert in golf in Gladwell's example would be Tiger Woods or Jack Nicklaus, not a scratch golfer.

 

This is one bad case of gross oversimplification of success IMO.  It's like almost saying pure ball striking will make one to become a tour pro.  Yes, it is a prerequisite but the entirety of becoming one.  

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