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The Dan Plan - 10,000 Hours to become a pro golfer - Page 46

post #811 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacm3bill View Post
 

True - I guess they figure you wouldn't know someone else's GHIN number (unless you're a club chairman or something, in which case you'd have a right to see someone's actual round dates), and if you're looking up by GHIN then you're looking up your own.

 

A number of years ago I figured out the formula for discovering someone's GHIN number. You could type in their last name and state, and then the URL would contain a pseudo binary version of their code, with a prefix and suffix check code. Strip those off, and the GHIN number was the binary number in the middle.

 

I definitely did not actually do this. (Click to show)
I may or may not have screwed with a friend by posting several + differential rounds to his handicap record…
post #812 of 1909

Recent write-up:

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-26384712

post #813 of 1909

Dan is at the halfway point and is still searching for a somewhat consistent golf move while playing at a questionable 4.1 index. This next season could be the make or break time for Dan. He has to improve his tournament scores in order to remain legitimate in the eyes of the golf public, if he goes out and shoots 92's while claiming a 4 he's going to find himself in some awkward discussions when asked about this disparity. I could understand an 82 or even 85 on a bad day but that has to be it.

post #814 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacm3bill View Post
 

 

That's just the way the system displays the entries for everybody. There was a change made a couple years ago where GHIN stopped displaying the exact dates of postings, for privacy reasons. (People didn't want their bosses seeing them post a round on a day they were supposed to be sick, for example.)

 

 

Very good to know.  Last year I played a round on a work day when the boss was out of town and just dated it on the nearest weekend instead.

post #815 of 1909

Does Dan have to get a tour card in order to "win"?  That seems like an unrealistic goal.  But if he gets to scratch or to the point that he's playing competitively in high level amateur tournaments, doesn't that validate the 10,000 hour rule, at least somewhat?  

 

As a 4HC, he's in the top 2.5% of all gofers who keep handicaps.  Scratch would be the top 1%.  It doesn't make much sense to say that he only "wins" if he makes the tour or something like that.  Especially since those guys have all probably put in more than 10,000 hours and probably started with more talent. The guy doesn't seem to have any natural talent for the game, and is better than 97.5% of other golfers. 

post #816 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post
 

Does Dan have to get a tour card in order to "win"?  That seems like an unrealistic goal.  But if he gets to scratch or to the point that he's playing competitively in high level amateur tournaments, doesn't that validate the 10,000 hour rule, at least somewhat?  

 

As a 4HC, he's in the top 2.5% of all gofers who keep handicaps.  Scratch would be the top 1%.  It doesn't make much sense to say that he only "wins" if he makes the tour or something like that.  Especially since those guys have all probably put in more than 10,000 hours and probably started with more talent. The guy doesn't seem to have any natural talent for the game, and is better than 97.5% of other golfers. 

 

That's a very compelling argument.

 

His original goal of becoming a pro golfer might have been misguided by his inexperience with the game. Even scratch is pretty hard without talent. So, If he had a goal of reaching something reasonable, like 4 handicap, with 10,000 hours, that makes a lot more sense.

 

He's halfway there time-wise, and if he can get to a solid 2 to 4 handicap, I would agree that he succeeded.

 

On the other hand, if this is his main point, then it has already been proven by my son's classmates and the thousands of other 14-18 year old golfers playing high school golf.

post #817 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

That's a very compelling argument.

 

His original goal of becoming a pro golfer might have been misguided by his inexperience with the game. Even scratch is pretty hard without talent. So, If he had a goal of reaching something reasonable, like 4 handicap, with 10,000 hours, that makes a lot more sense.

 

He's halfway there time-wise, and if he can get to a solid 2 to 4 handicap, I would agree that he succeeded.

 

On the other hand, if this is his main point, then it has already been proven by my son's classmates and the thousands of other 14-18 year old golfers playing high school golf.


His inexperience may be showing up again with his questionable index,  unless he really is a 4.1 he needs to play better in tournaments because there you can't hide bad days by just not posting a score, by inexperience he may have let himself feel the pressure of needing to show a steady incline of improvement and therefore omit rounds from posting. If his tournament scores once again are in the double digit range over par this whole thing may start to unravel.

post #818 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post
 

Does Dan have to get a tour card in order to "win"?  That seems like an unrealistic goal.  But if he gets to scratch or to the point that he's playing competitively in high level amateur tournaments, doesn't that validate the 10,000 hour rule, at least somewhat?  

 

As a 4HC, he's in the top 2.5% of all gofers who keep handicaps.  Scratch would be the top 1%.  It doesn't make much sense to say that he only "wins" if he makes the tour or something like that.  Especially since those guys have all probably put in more than 10,000 hours and probably started with more talent. The guy doesn't seem to have any natural talent for the game, and is better than 97.5% of other golfers. 

 

I agree with you. His definition of "expert" is too lofty.

 

Of course, starting a project with a goal to achieve a 0.0 index is not as compelling as playing on the PGA Tour.  My gut feeling is that Dan's original plan was to create publicity for his project.  To a certain extent he has succeeded in that facet.  He has had write-ups in major magazines, interviews on TV and radio, etc...  None of that would likely have occurred without his goal of playing on the PGA Tour.  No one is going to write about a goof ball who quits his job and spends 5 years trying to be a scratch golfer.  The goal is what makes the story pop.

post #819 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

That's a very compelling argument.

 

His original goal of becoming a pro golfer might have been misguided by his inexperience with the game. Even scratch is pretty hard without talent. So, If he had a goal of reaching something reasonable, like 4 handicap, with 10,000 hours, that makes a lot more sense.

 

He's halfway there time-wise, and if he can get to a solid 2 to 4 handicap, I would agree that he succeeded.

 

On the other hand, if this is his main point, then it has already been proven by my son's classmates and the thousands of other 14-18 year old golfers playing high school golf.


His inexperience may be showing up again with his questionable index,  unless he really is a 4.1 he needs to play better in tournaments because there you can't hide bad days by just not posting a score, by inexperience he may have let himself feel the pressure of needing to show a steady incline of improvement and therefore omit rounds from posting. If his tournament scores once again are in the double digit range over par this whole thing may start to unravel.

 

Yeah, it's pretty obvious to me as well that if he scores in the 92 range, that he is most likely not a legitimate 4 handicap. It seems like a tournament round and a normal round should only be a few strokes different.

 

If he does get down to a solid 2 to 4 handicap, he would at least prove his point.

 

That just brings up another point. Why is he doing it? I mean, other than to have fun.

 

I just think there are already thousands of teens who are proving that already. They train for 10,000 hours and get down to a 2 to 4 handicap, maybe scratch for those with a lot more talent. He did not need to do this to get those statistics. In fact, if I were do do the "Lihu Plan 10,000 hours of golf to become a pro", I would follow 1000 kids who started off so so and got pretty good by their early teens. I would track their records and tournament scores and record how often they practice. When they hit 10,000 hours, I would track that statistic.

 

However, I think it would only be more interesting after 15,000 hours. Two 15 year old kids I know at a 2 to 2.5 handicap have already practiced more than 15,000 hours.

 

Even one of the 8 year old kids that I talked about in earlier posts, probably practiced thousands of hours (maybe even 10,000?). One of them was at Goose Creek, where I pointed him out to @iacas and @mvmac. If that little 8 year old kid is within 150 yards of the hole he will on average get it in in a little less than 3 strokes. When he can carry a drive 220+ yards, he should be pretty close to scratch or better.

 

There are so many talented kids that can prove his point, I don't understand why he is personally doing it.

 

Maybe he just wants to prove that he can do it? IDK, if that's really interesting to anyone other than himself.

post #820 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

Yeah, it's pretty obvious to me as well that if he scores in the 92 range, that he is most likely not a legitimate 4 handicap. It seems like a tournament round and a normal round should only be a few strokes different.

 

If he does get down to a solid 2 to 4 handicap, he would at least prove his point.

 

That just brings up another point. Why is he doing it? I mean, other than to have fun.

 

I just think there are already thousands of teens who are proving that already. They train for 10,000 hours and get down to a 2 to 4 handicap, maybe scratch for those with a lot more talent. He did not need to do this to get those statistics. In fact, if I were do do the "Lihu Plan 10,000 hours of golf to become a pro", I would follow 1000 kids who started off so so and got pretty good by their early teens. I would track their records and tournament scores and record how often they practice. When they hit 10,000 hours, I would track that statistic.

 

However, I think it would only be more interesting after 15,000 hours. Two 15 year old kids I know at a 2 to 2.5 handicap have already practiced more than 15,000 hours.

 

Even one of the 8 year old kids that I talked about in earlier posts, probably practiced thousands of hours (maybe even 10,000?). One of them was at Goose Creek, where I pointed him out to @iacas and @mvmac. If that little 8 year old kid is within 150 yards of the hole he will on average get it in in a little less than 3 strokes. When he can carry a drive 220+ yards, he should be pretty close to scratch or better.

 

There are so many talented kids that can prove his point, I don't understand why he is personally doing it.

 

Maybe he just wants to prove that he can do it? IDK, if that's really interesting to anyone other than himself.

 

I think he's trying to have fun and has the money to do it.

 

I also think that at the end, he's going to write a book and go on a lecture circuit.  Maybe motivational speaking.

post #821 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by krupa View Post
 

I think he's trying to have fun and has the money to do it.

 

I also think that at the end, he's going to write a book and go on a lecture circuit.  Maybe motivational speaking.

 

I agree that he might have some people interested in the motivational speaking aspect.

 

Probably not for golf, because normal people will not be able to spend 10,000 hours to get decent at it.

 

Tracking children's statistics would be of more interest to parents, and not how he does personally.

 

So, to whom will he lecture?

post #822 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post
 


His inexperience may be showing up again with his questionable index,  unless he really is a 4.1 he needs to play better in tournaments because there you can't hide bad days by just not posting a score, by inexperience he may have let himself feel the pressure of needing to show a steady incline of improvement and therefore omit rounds from posting. If his tournament scores once again are in the double digit range over par this whole thing may start to unravel.

 

I think someone posted his latest rounds on the prior page and 2 were tournaments.  They had differentials of 5 and 11, I think.  That seems reasonable.  

post #823 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


Two 15 year old kids I know at a 2 to 2.5 handicap have already practiced more than 15,000 hours.

Even one of the 8 year old kids that I talked about in earlier posts, probably practiced thousands of hours (maybe even 10,000?).

Just for perspective, if you practiced 40 hours a week (equal to full time employment) you would have 2080 a year, so 10,000 hours = 4.8 years and 15,000 = 7.2 years. Mind you this rule of thumb is on "deliberate practice" which means a round of golf would not count. That would be a large amount of practice for a school age child.

In my opinion, aside from work ethic, you have to have raw talent to be a pro, in any sport.
post #824 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

I agree that he might have some people interested in the motivational speaking aspect.

 

Probably not for golf, because normal people will not be able to spend 10,000 hours to get decent at it.

 

Tracking children's statistics would be of more interest to parents, and not how he does personally.

 

So, to whom will he lecture?

I have absolutely no idea.  But if Snooki can get paid to speak at Rutgers, Dan will find someone to talk to. :)

post #825 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmartin461 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


Two 15 year old kids I know at a 2 to 2.5 handicap have already practiced more than 15,000 hours.

Even one of the 8 year old kids that I talked about in earlier posts, probably practiced thousands of hours (maybe even 10,000?).

Just for perspective, if you practiced 40 hours a week (equal to full time employment) you would have 2080 a year, so 10,000 hours = 4.8 years and 15,000 = 7.2 years. Mind you this rule of thumb is on "deliberate practice" which means a round of golf would not count. That would be a large amount of practice for a school age child.

In my opinion, aside from work ethic, you have to have raw talent to be a pro, in any sport.

 

Yes, I agree. Of the 1000 kids I would track, I would expect that only 10 of them reach scratch and that 1 of them might be a pro prospect.

 

BTW, in regard to the 15 year old kids I am including their weekly rounds so they put in something like 60 to 80 hours per week. So, I think they are actually higher than 15,000 hours, possibly double. The thing is they are seriously addicted to golf too. Note that I used the word "addicted". Both sets of parents are very concerned. . .

post #826 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Yes, I agree. Of the 1000 kids I would track, I would expect that only 10 of them reach scratch and that 1 of them might be a pro prospect.

BTW, in regard to the 15 year old kids I am including their weekly rounds so they put in something like 60 to 80 hours per week. So, I think they are actually higher than 15,000 hours, possibly double. The thing is they are seriously addicted to golf too. Note that I used the word "addicted". Both sets of parents are very concerned. . .

Assuming they get 8 hours sleep per day, that means they have 112 waking hours per week.
And you know kids that practice (or play) for 60-80 of those hours.... For every week.... of every year!!!!

Somehow I think you'll struggle to find anyone that plays 10 hours out of 16 waking hours every day.
It would probably detrimental to play/practice that much. (Injuries etc)
post #827 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopefulhacker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Yes, I agree. Of the 1000 kids I would track, I would expect that only 10 of them reach scratch and that 1 of them might be a pro prospect.

BTW, in regard to the 15 year old kids I am including their weekly rounds so they put in something like 60 to 80 hours per week. So, I think they are actually higher than 15,000 hours, possibly double. The thing is they are seriously addicted to golf too. Note that I used the word "addicted". Both sets of parents are very concerned. . .

Assuming they get 8 hours sleep per day, that means they have 112 waking hours per week.
And you know kids that practice (or play) for 60-80 of those hours.... For every week.... of every year!!!!

Somehow I think you'll struggle to find anyone that plays 10 hours out of 16 waking hours every day.
It would probably detrimental to play/practice that much. (Injuries etc)

 

I agree for you and me, but these kids are built for it. I'm sure they take care of themselves, like hit shorter if they feel sore to avoid injury. They do take some breaks. One of them went on a family vacation and suffered from withdrawals being away from golf for three days.

 

Here's one of their schedules (according to his mom and dad): Mon-Fri School from 8am to 2pm @ lunch he hits at the range and pitches and putts. I don't think he putts in the classroom, yet. After 1 hour of homework time, he tries to play 18 holes (Currently he can do it, and in the winter less because of the dark). He plays for free or $1. At 5:00 he eats dinner and from 5:30 to 6:30 he does more homework. From 6:30pm to 9:30pm (sometimes 10:00pm) he goes to the night range and practices till they close at night. Sometimes puts in an 18 hole par 3 round. Including some practice rounds, which he practices drills because he does it every single day, he puts in about 6 hours per day. On the weekends he's pretty much a fixture on the course and plays 2 (sometimes 3) rounds per day, plus drills and lessons. That would be 6*5+20 to 24 or about 50 to 58 hours per week or more including scoring rounds.

 

IDK, what the other kid's schedule is like, he has more natural talent, but pretty much lives on the local courses as well. He's on my kids high school team, but we don't know his practice habits. At least I don't.

 

@mvmac can ask my kid about the previous one (they've known each other since kindergarten) when we go to our lesson.

post #828 of 1909
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsc123 View Post
 

 

I think someone posted his latest rounds on the prior page and 2 were tournaments.  They had differentials of 5 and 11, I think.  That seems reasonable.  


He had 1 tournament that he finally shot at his index, rated 69.9/123 he shot a 76, that's the same as a 79 where I play not bad in fact good but not great by any measure for where he wants to wind up. The other looks like it was at the same course probably the day before must be a 2 day event, so that second score was actually after playing a competitive round the day before, looks like he shot himself out of contention the first day so he was probably relaxed the second day since nothing was on the line by then.

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