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polara golf balls

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 

anyone try these? supposedly they are self straightening. just curious as to how they work. And yes I know they are not confirming etc etc. just curious as to if they actually work.

post #2 of 47

There is a fairly thorough FAQ and explanation of the science on their website but basically it's a golf ball that prevents you from learning how to hit a golf ball ;-)

 

 

 

post #3 of 47

Hi All,

 

Polara self-correcting golf balls work by counter-acting the side spin that creates the hook or slice.

 

This is done by an asymetrical dimple design.

 

When properly aligned to target using the arrow marking on the ball this sets the dimple pattern in the proper position to work on the side-spin.

 

If you do not align the dimples properly using the arrow marking, the ball will fly just like any normal golf ball.

 

This asymetrical dimple design does work. It has been proven in independent tests.

 

It will not affect your putting.

post #4 of 47



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetstream View Post

Hi All,

 

Polara self-correcting golf balls work by counter-acting the side spin that creates the hook or slice.

 

This is done by an asymetrical dimple design.

 

When properly aligned to target using the arrow marking on the ball this sets the dimple pattern in the proper position to work on the side-spin.

 

If you do not align the dimples properly using the arrow marking, the ball will fly just like any normal golf ball.

 

This asymetrical dimple design does work. It has been proven in independent tests.

 

It will not affect your putting.



If a ball aligned a certain way has been proven to counteract sidespin, would setting that ball on its side cause it to counteract backspin? Is this some kind of trick ball to fool your friends?

 

If a golfer aligns his ball in the forest, but nobody sees him, do the penalty strokes still count?

post #5 of 47

It really comes down to whether you want to play a non conforming ball or not. Since if it is used the way you describe it could not meet the rules.  

 

post #6 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by allin View Post

It really comes down to whether you want to play a non conforming ball or not. Since if it is used the way you describe it could not meet the rules.  

 


It doesn't meet the rules. It states that on their website, although not perfectly clearly, it's still there.
post #7 of 47

There's an article in the NY Times about it, with a video under the Multimedia headline at:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/10/sports/golf/10ball.html?_r=1&ref=golf

post #8 of 47

Funny that know one mentions what happens when you hit it for your second shot.    Unless you pick up the ball and place it back in the fairway with the dimple alignment just perfect, you now have a ball that would exaggerate a slice or hook, or would be completely inconsistent on distance.     That perfect (albeit illegal) slice-less drive down the middle of the fairway now ends up with a well struck second shot that now doesn't go where it should and lands you in the water hazard.    

 

I'm not sure why it bothers me so much that there are so many companies trying to find non-conforming ways to address the golf game.   Including one of the sponsors on this site that shaves driver faces thinner.      None of these improve the game that much and all come with their attendant problems as well - how about just playing the game by the rules and enjoy it for what it is?

post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

If a ball aligned a certain way has been proven to counteract sidespin, would setting that ball on its side cause it to counteract backspin? Is this some kind of trick ball to fool your friends?

 

If a golfer aligns his ball in the forest, but nobody sees him, do the penalty strokes still count?


 

Second shot kind of implied here.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clambake View Post

Funny that know one mentions what happens when you hit it for your second shot.    Unless you pick up the ball and place it back in the fairway with the dimple alignment just perfect, you now have a ball that would exaggerate a slice or hook, or would be completely inconsistent on distance.     That perfect (albeit illegal) slice-less drive down the middle of the fairway now ends up with a well struck second shot that now doesn't go where it should and lands you in the water hazard.    

 

I'm not sure why it bothers me so much that there are so many companies trying to find non-conforming ways to address the golf game.   Including one of the sponsors on this site that shaves driver faces thinner.      None of these improve the game that much and all come with their attendant problems as well - how about just playing the game by the rules and enjoy it for what it is?



 

post #10 of 47

Polara golf ball, "Always flies straight."

http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/blog/devil_ball_golf/post/New-golf-ball-flies-straight-off-the-tee-8230-?urn=golf-wp1752

 

in short, a new golf ball that flies lower and straighter due to its dimple design.  however, it doesn't conform to USGA standards.  i personally wouldn't be interested in trying these, but i wouldn't be surprised to see my 15-20 handicap golf buddies start bringing them to the course.  there seems to be a pretty fair bit of debate about whether or not this kind of thing helps or hurts the game.  thoughts?

post #11 of 47

I'd say it hurts.  My game is quite awful currently, but it used to be alright.  I golfed as a teenager and went from 120+ to consistently breaking 100 and occasionally breaking 90.  I took ten years off and am just now getting back into the game, and am back to shooting in the 100's.  I do know, though, that I can improve, and quickly too, by focusing my efforts on actually getting better.  I took a lesson this past Sunday which really knocked some rust off my swing, and I try to get to the range at least twice a week.  That's what you do to get better at golf...work at it.  You can't, and shouldn't, buy a solid golf swing.  The struggle is the glory, after all. 

post #12 of 47

Might be nice for a novelty round, but not something that I am going game every round. 

post #13 of 47

Hurt hurt and hurt some more.

 

If you never get bad shots, how can you discover swing flaws and fix them?

post #14 of 47

The ball is generating lots of comments and hits on the NYTimes. Someone mentioned in there that the ball has actually been around for many years.

 

If you push or pull it, the ball won't help. I wonder if you lose distance.

 

I have no problem with it, use whatever you want, as long as you keep pace.

post #15 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post

If you push or pull it, the ball won't help. I wonder if you lose distance.


But if the ball goes straight you'll assume it's a "bad shot" if it's pushed or pulled when in reality it could be a beautiful soft draw/fade. You'll then strive to perfect the "problem" even though there isn't one if the ball would be hitting the target. a4_sad.gif

 

post #16 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiniBlueDragon View Post




But if the ball goes straight you'll assume it's a "bad shot" if it's pushed or pulled when in reality it could be a beautiful soft draw/fade. You'll then strive to perfect the "problem" even though there isn't one if the ball would be hitting the target. a4_sad.gif

 

 

Exactly!  I push all my shots.  The ball flying straight would be a disaster for me. 
 

 

post #17 of 47

the Polara ball mentioned in NY Times is not the same design as the old one.  i have the old one in my collection and it is kind of opposite in pattern layout.  I tried new polara -  it works. it made the game more fun for me and those i played with (I am a 28 who struggles with slice) becuase i hit 17 of 18 fairways.  it did not make my putts, sand shots, or any other shot easier or harder, but my drives were straight.  it was longer on irons -   felt good!      i would recommend for high handicappers.  i would not recommend for low handicappers who want to work the ball.   i bet it would be fun in the company scrammble for the people who play one time per year and shoot 150! 

post #18 of 47

Sean - Your description of what happens on the second shot is incorrect.   The ball never exaggerates a slice or hook no matter how the ball is positioned.   If the ball is not aligned in its optimum orientation to prevent slices and hooks, it just behaves like a normal golf ball. In all cases I find the ball is 1-2 club lengths longer off irons so instead of playing a 5 iron I play a 7 iron with the Polara.  Without going into the physics of how it works (I have a PhD in Chemical Engineering and a strong science background, so I understand the aerodynamics and mechanical dynamics of what is going on here), the best way to describe it is the ball prevents the curvature of flight seen with slice and hook shots.  I have played a lot of rounds with this ball and can tell you it has never gone in the wrong direction unless I pulled or pushed it that way (pulls and pushes are straight shots, hooks and slices have curvature due to the accelerating force of the mis-directed lift vector).  I am a 28 handicapper and I now hit nearly every fairway with this ball.  Yes, I even take a one Mulligan per 9 holes and I even offer gimme's to people on 2 ft putts - these are not part of the USGA Rules but they are part of the fabric of golf.  For recreational golfers like me the Polara ball makes the game a lot of fun.  It does not remove all of the challenge, just one of the biggest frustrations.  I can now crush the ball on drives and not worry about slicing.    For Pros, the ball is nonconforming (and should remain so).  Funny thing is, now the USGA and PGA are even saying that the Polara ball is alright for recreational golfers because it will help get more people into golf.  And that is good for all of us.   If you want to be a purist and play by the rules, have at it.  Nobody is going to stop you and I admire people like you have been able to develop their golf skills to such a high level.  But for the rest of us, please don't discourage us by telling us we are cheating or ruining the game - because we are not.  The game of golf is just that - a game, meant to be enjoyed.  And btw, the rules and equipment have changed so much over the years that I am not even sure what a golf purist is any more.  Look at the 1744 Rules and ask yourself "how did we get here?"  The Polara ball did conform to the rules of golf until the USGA created a rule specifically to outlaw the Polara ball and for doing so, they had to pay Polara $1.4M in an out of court settlement.  Drivers today with all the adjustable weighting systems, materials, biases, etc - how can a purist even look at these?  And besides, they don't correct 75% of a slice like the Polara does ($400 partial slice solution vs $2 complete slice & hook solution - wow)

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