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How much does it really matter to have a top-brand putter? - Page 2

post #19 of 40
Expensive putters (a topic that it's clear we've exhausted based on the search feature) are wort they fit you. Chances are, if you're buying one off the rack, if won't fit any better than what you've got so it might not be better. Try it out, who knows, maybe you'll make more putts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kieran123 View Post

I heard Tiger is now using a hockey stick putter. They're on sale at golf town


OT, I know, but those are going for big money at my local Golf Town. They're all have Bruins logos and since the Stanley Cup the prices have skyrocketed.
post #20 of 40

At the risk of losing some credibility, I'm gonna back pedal and give the OP the benefit of the doubt on his query.

 

To be honest, I do think high end putters can be better balanced. Not everyone needs a "balanced" putter, but for some people it gives them a little extra confidence and that's 1/2 the battle with putting.

post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

At the risk of losing some credibility, I'm gonna back pedal and give the OP the benefit of the doubt on his query.

 

Please, like you still have any left to lose?a2_wink.gif.
 

 

post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by trackster View Post

 

I take some jokes for having a putter from the 1940s (no lie) but i love it and have yet to 4 putt this year and have been averaging right around 15 per nine


Some of the older putters have amazing feel. The old school blade putters that look like someone's melted down doorknob actually are amazing if you get the right one in your hands.

post #23 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elvisliveson View Post



Please, like you still have any left to lose?a2_wink.gif.
 

 


Have truer words ever been spoken?

post #24 of 40

Like most clubs ( for me anyway ) we love each other at first - the romance is hot, I hit greens, I sink putts, I smoke drives - but as the relationship grows, we get bored of each other and the honeymoon period ends, I start chunking, slicing, and leave myself 4 feet. We talk to each other ( well I do most of the talking ) but neither will listen - until we ( I ) realize, it aint the clubs fault for my miserable game, it's me.

 

What I'm trying to say is, get a putter you are comfortable with and can hit - and when your putting gets a little 'iffy', put up with it and practice and give it time to see if it comes around rather than think you need to invest in new tools.

post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kieran123 View Post

Like most clubs ( for me anyway ) we love each other at first - the romance is hot, I hit greens, I sink putts, I smoke drives - but as the relationship grows, we get bored of each other and the honeymoon period ends, I start chunking, slicing, and leave myself 4 feet. We talk to each other ( well I do most of the talking ) but neither will listen - until we ( I ) realize, it aint the clubs fault for my miserable game, it's me.



And with these club's there's still often a first love, the one we go back to.. for me it's my Spalding TP Mills, I've tried other putters but it was my first love and it's the one I'll go back to for comfort every time. With putter's I think this is especially true.. it's a romance thing, but really it's not a technology thing... it's in the head. 

post #26 of 40



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SamW View Post





And with these club's there's still often a first love, the one we go back to.. for me it's my Spalding TP Mills, I've tried other putters but it was my first love and it's the one I'll go back to for comfort every time. With putter's I think this is especially true.. it's a romance thing, but really it's not a technology thing... it's in the head. 



I had a black Pinnacle anser style blade with tungsten (or maybe nickel?) heel and toe weights. Best $80 I ever spent. During one dark period while we were separated, I allowed my girlfriend at the time to put it in her bag for the summer. Our last summer together as it happened. It was 15 years ago and I still miss that putter.

 

post #27 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post



 



I had a black Pinnacle anser style blade with tungsten (or maybe nickel?) heel and toe weights. Best $80 I ever spent. During one dark period while we were separated, I allowed my girlfriend at the time to put it in her bag for the summer. Our last summer together as it happened. It was 15 years ago and I still miss that putter.

 

 

One of these: http://cgi.ebay.com/Pinnacle-Tri-Line-Putter-35-/120702462564 ? Pinnacle didn't make so many putters I think.
 

 

post #28 of 40

Quote:

Originally Posted by deronsizemore View Post

Must important thing is making sure it fits you. Most putters have four degrees of loft and are 71 lie. I like mine to be about 70 lie and anywhere from .5 - 2 loft. Just depends on the putter. Some look different than others. ... 

Find a putter you like, break it in for a few rounds, and then get a putter fitting. Deron above IDs two key factors. Also, consider shaft length and what type of grip you want.

 

In January: If you bang your bag around a lot in handling, get a loft-lie check on you putter before the new season starts. Heads made of softer metals might bend a little over the season.

post #29 of 40

I've putted with a very old titleist bullseye before and it works pretty well...

post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jshots View Post

I've putted with a very old titleist bullseye before and it works pretty well...



Amazing putter on fast greens.

 

post #31 of 40

Despite owning one, I wouldn't say so. Practicing helped more than anything else. I just bought the putter because it felt good, looked good, and I had the extra cash for it.

post #32 of 40

Its only important if the user thinks that a expensive putter makes putt better.  Personally, Ive use everything ranging from $35 Wilson putters to $300 Camerons and Bettinardis and they all work the same.

post #33 of 40

My putting game increased 10-fold after buying a new putter. I was previously using an old Odyssey that was always just too light in the head. It was really hard to judge power/distance control from the fringe or 20' out. I picked up the Odyssey from a friend who paid around $150.

I picked up a Trend R7 Nano Putter (ceramic white head) from MC Sports for $19.99! It was an overstock type of one-time sale. The kid kept thinking they mislabeled it because of the look and feel of it. The suggested MSRP was $139.99 (as all MSRP's are usually inflated by 500% anyway). I was lucky enough to grab the last one that they had. It took some getting used to because compared to my last putter, this is like swinging a sledge hammer. The weight keeps me consistent and slower. I also get awesome roll directly at impact with no skid/hop.

Like the rest of the guys here said - I think it's more or less the "feel" and definitely, definitely, not the cost/name. Sometimes buying something new just increases confidence and can refresh the game. Sorry for the long rant!

post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone for the advice!

 

I probably will end up getting a new putter within the next few years. I just have a pretty basic one right now, I think it's Acuity brand. But I perform pretty well with it, so I'll stick with it for now.

post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatishten View Post

Despite owning one, I wouldn't say so. Practicing helped more than anything else. I just bought the putter because it felt good, looked good, and I had the extra cash for it.

Totally agree and I own a couple!  When my brother was looking for a new putter we went to the store and I would hand him a putter without him looking at the price or brand so that would have no influence on him.  What we found out was he putted best with a putter that that he felt comfortable standing over and looking at during address.  I don't think you need to spend $300 on a putter, but a putter from your local putt putt might not be the best either.  One of my favorite putters is a Ping Nickel Anser, that was less than $100.  It is just the right firmness/softness and the ball makes a sound off the putter that suits my ear, so I know when I have struck the ball solid.

 

All that being said, practice the one you've got and you might be surprised.

 

post #36 of 40

I kind of agree with everyone here.  Confidence, stroke and how well it fits to your game is important.  I feel though that you might have more room to improve your putting with a higher end putter than if you were still using a lower quality one.  Then again if you can't afford it, you can't afford it and its going to be "don't get it everytime"

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