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bad course strategy.......it destroys so many rounds for high handicappers.... - Page 6

post #91 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

I disagree, bad ball striking destroys many rounds for high handicappers.
Yup. Best strategy in the world can't save bad contact.

For exampe I'll line up on the right side of a tee box and align myself along the left edge of the hole, looking to hit a straight fade. Then I'll hit a push fade and my start line will be 15 degrees to the right of where I intended. That fade that was supposed to land in the middle of the fairway is now somewhere in the trees along the right side of the hole.

This push can happen with any club longer than an 8i. Can't do anything about it other than to fix my swing.
post #92 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

 

If you are just beginning, then there is nothing wrong with leaving the driver out of the bag except at the range, and playing tees that accommodate that.  You are assuming that everyone should be playing a course more than 6000 yards.  That is the sort of thinking that leads to experienced players getting pissed off at beginners being on the course at all.  Encourage them to play the course with the clubs that are  most comfortable, with tees appropriate to their length and ability, then learn how to hit the other clubs on the practice tee before they try them on the course. 

 

I think you should read my post again because what you posted is the exact opposite of what I stated. I am not assuming that anyone should be playing any specific level of difficulty or yardage. I clearly stated that golfers can get away with leaving their driver at home if they are playing a shorter course (hence, this can obviously include tees that provide a shorter overall yardage). On the flip-side, if a player wants to become better they should be practicing with their driver more so that they can fix the flaws that have them considering leaving the driver at home, rather than continuously opt to not use that club because of said flaws.

My point is pretty clear if you read what I said carefully. If you're content without your driver, so be it. But, if you want to advance your game and eventually play courses that are more difficult or are slightly longer, you should obviously resolve the issues with your driver rather than have a significant disadvantage by leaving the club at home.
 

post #93 of 178
Not using your driver, even as a beginner, is like playing tennis with a racket ball racket.

There are courses that are 3200 yards long for 18 holes. If you can't hit driver yet, those might be a good place to play until you can use the driver adequately.

Otherwise, playing on a regulation course is going to be frustrating and long. There will probably be a course Marshall following you all day too.
post #94 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post


 

Yep.  You're the guy the OP is talking about.  d2_doh.gif

 

By the way, if you turn in all of those scores, what you describe is just another form of sandbagging.  z7_no.gif

I read through the replys from the years old thread, and noticed no one commented on this one, but it struck me. And it actually made me think (and that is no small feat for me).

 

If I play my every day rounds in a more aggressive fashion than I play my tournament rounds, am I sandbagging? If I try my best to pull of the 20% shot, or the hero shot in the weekly game, but would never try in a tournament, am I sandbagging, even unintentionally. I have never even thought about it, but now, maybe I am artificially inflating my handicap by playing with two different mentalities. 

 

But if I post all my scores, isn't it accounting for that in my handicap? 

 

Thoughts?

post #95 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by dzclarkcpa View Post
 

I read through the replys from the years old thread, and noticed no one commented on this one, but it struck me. And it actually made me think (and that is no small feat for me).

 

If I play my every day rounds in a more aggressive fashion than I play my tournament rounds, am I sandbagging? If I try my best to pull of the 20% shot, or the hero shot in the weekly game, but would never try in a tournament, am I sandbagging, even unintentionally. I have never even thought about it, but now, maybe I am artificially inflating my handicap by playing with two different mentalities. 

 

But if I post all my scores, isn't it accounting for that in my handicap? 

 

Thoughts?

I think most people play more aggressively or try more risky shots during practice or regular rounds than they would in a tournament where every shot counts. I don't think that in any way is artificially inflating your handicap. Your handicap is based on your best scores is it not? There is a difference between intentionally playing bad and trying low percentage shots while not in competition.

post #96 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post
 

I think most people play more aggressively or try more risky shots during practice or regular rounds than they would in a tournament where every shot counts. I don't think that in any way is artificially inflating your handicap. Your handicap is based on your best scores is it not? There is a difference between intentionally playing bad and trying low percentage shots while not in competition.

 

Not to mention, if you never try the risky shots in a casual round, how will you know that you can, or can't, pull them off otherwise?

post #97 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlSpackler View Post
 

 

Not to mention, if you never try the risky shots in a casual round, how will you know that you can, or can't, pull them off otherwise?

Exactly, that is the time to try and learn new shots that you can use to get out of trouble in the future.

post #98 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by dzclarkcpa View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post


 

Yep.  You're the guy the OP is talking about.  d2_doh.gif

 

By the way, if you turn in all of those scores, what you describe is just another form of sandbagging.  z7_no.gif

I read through the replys from the years old thread, and noticed no one commented on this one, but it struck me. And it actually made me think (and that is no small feat for me).

 

If I play my every day rounds in a more aggressive fashion than I play my tournament rounds, am I sandbagging? If I try my best to pull of the 20% shot, or the hero shot in the weekly game, but would never try in a tournament, am I sandbagging, even unintentionally. I have never even thought about it, but now, maybe I am artificially inflating my handicap by playing with two different mentalities. 

 

But if I post all my scores, isn't it accounting for that in my handicap? 

 

Thoughts?

 

That somewhat depends on your success rate for the hero shot, and how much the success or failure ultimately affects your handicap.

post #99 of 178

In the 2.5 years of playing golf seriously I've found very few high handicappers incorporate a real strategy.  I agree 100% that poor ball striking is the high handicappers biggest problem, but they make it worse by not playing to the strengths of their game.  Very often I see guys choosing clubs based on max distance.  If they are 225 - 300 yards out, most will choose a 3w to hit it as far as they can and leave themselves a tougher approach shot rather than lay up and give themselves an easier approach.

 

I also notice that if a high handicapper has a strategy, they don't account for weather and course conditions and play the same strategy no matter what conditions they face.

post #100 of 178

If high hc players lack only course management...... they wouldn't be high hc any more...

 

I second the ball striking to be the most important for hc.  Take 3w for example.  I haven't seen a hc like high 90 above who can hit decent 200-210 with reasonable consistency with 3w.  That includes myself:-D.  I went from what is hc to kind of bogey+ player.  The biggest difference between then and now is the ability and confidence to hit a shot without thinking too much.  Once there is some confidence sinks in, course management can be easily applicable. 

post #101 of 178
For me it'erratic ballstriking and lack of confidence. If I have a good day Im bombing it out there with hybrids and mid irons.

wedge shots and short game... they are my nightmare LOL.

Last time I had a lesson on short game, was like, 8 years ago or something.
Im a returning golfer back to the game.

Im making triple bogey and worse because of shanked chips and pitches...

or maybe they are toe strikes actually... sometimes topping them too...
post #102 of 178

The swing is the foundation of everything. Mental game, strategy, etc. means nothing if the foundation is not solid. How can I be a confident golfer if I don't have a reasonable expectation of where the ball is going to go. How can I develop a good strategy if my distances and ball flight vary. This is my current battle and the reason I am working on my swing.

post #103 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlSpackler View Post
 

The swing is the foundation of everything. Mental game, strategy, etc. means nothing if the foundation is not solid. How can I be a confident golfer if I don't have a reasonable expectation of where the ball is going to go. How can I develop a good strategy if my distances and ball flight vary. This is my current battle and the reason I am working on my swing.

I agree, but I've also found that confidence varies with the club in your hands and the circumstances. 

post #104 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

That somewhat depends on your success rate for the hero shot, and how much the success or failure ultimately affects your handicap.

Sadly for my "conservative" game......with about the same rate for hero shot as conservative.....

post #105 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

I agree, but I've also found that confidence varies with the club in your hands and the circumstances. 


Your confidence with any club in your hand increases as your swing improves. It doesn't mean you won't mishit some shots, but even your mishits are better. Swing is key.

post #106 of 178

As an actual high handicapper, I think you have to play the club that gives you the best change for success. Don't try hero shots, get back on the fairway immediately, and just generally play smart. Lay up when you should, not just because you can. Most high handicappers like me are shooting the scores they are because of inconsistent ball striking. Sure if you are crazy ass wild with your driver, you should keep it in the bag but only if you have a club that you can be successful with. 

post #107 of 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

I disagree, bad ball striking destroys many rounds for high handicappers.
Yup. Best strategy in the world can't save bad contact.

For exampe I'll line up on the right side of a tee box and align myself along the left edge of the hole, looking to hit a straight fade. Then I'll hit a push fade and my start line will be 15 degrees to the right of where I intended. That fade that was supposed to land in the middle of the fairway is now somewhere in the trees along the right side of the hole.

This push can happen with any club longer than an 8i. Can't do anything about it other than to fix my swing.

These days, my bad rounds are caused by poor ball striking that comes and goes unexpectedly.   No amount of course strategy is saving me from hitting a PW into a lateral hazard.  I believe with most high 'cappers, poor execution is the main culprit.   Once they learn to hit fairly straight with most clubs, they can then think about course strategy.   Of course YMMV depending on what you consider "high" 'cappers.

post #108 of 178
On a Par 5 when hitting second shot I'll hit a hybrid (no chance of hitting green anyway) to keep from spraying a 3 Wood in water, woods, etc. 3 Wood or Hybrid off tee on short par 4's.
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