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Altitude adjustments and course suggestions

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
2 Questions: I'm from Utah and golf a lot here at higher altitudes (apx 4-5K ft). Planning on going to play in Auburn, AL.  I've never played at sea level.
 
Question 1 - How much difference in club distance is there at sea level, and
Question 2 - where should I play in Auburn, AL?

 

If it helps, here are a couple of rough distances that I play at my elevation:

 

3wd - 250

4hyb - 220

5i - 200

8i - 160

pw-130

52 deg - 100-120

56 deg - 60-100

 

thx

post #2 of 18

Your about 2% longer per 1000 ft so about 10%.  You also need to factor in temperature and humidity change which might give you back some of those yards you are losing.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattboywonder View Post

2 Questions: I'm from Utah and golf a lot here at higher altitudes (apx 4-5K ft). Planning on going to play in Auburn, AL.  I've never played at sea level.
 
Question 1 - How much difference in club distance is there at sea level, and
Question 2 - where should I play in Auburn, AL?

 

If it helps, here are a couple of rough distances that I play at my elevation:

 

3wd - 250

4hyb - 220

5i - 200

8i - 160

pw-130

52 deg - 100-120

56 deg - 60-100

 

thx



 

post #3 of 18

Grand National in Auburn/Opelika, it's part of the RTJ golf trail and fantastic.  I played it years ago and was very impressed.

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by x129 View Post

Your about 2% longer per 1000 ft so about 10%.  You also need to factor in temperature and humidity change which might give you back some of those yards you are losing.

Dug this thread up because I'm going to be playing Old Works in Montana in June.  Their recommended tees for 5-9 handicappers are 7200 yards.  Their recommended tees for under 5 handicaps are 7700 yards.  I've never even heard of a course that had tees that far back, let alone actually recommending that 4 handicappers play them.  So they are either really sadistic, or obviously there is some gained distance at the altitude.  According to Wikipedia, the elevation in downtown Anaconda is 5,335 ft, whereas here in Orange County we are (obviously) pretty close to sea level.

 

If x129's data is correct, then I need to add the same 10% to my distances.  Anybody else concur or disagree with the 2% per 1000 ft. assessment?

 

Nevermind the fact that I will be further complicating things by playing with my old standard length (and weaker lofted) clubs, instead of my current clubs ... which are about 1.25" longer than standard.  I'll work out that difference myself. :)

post #5 of 18

^^^ Sorry, don't know that answer... but I have a question.

I normally hit my 6 iron 160 yards and I recently played a course where the altitude drop from the tee to the green was about 100 feet, the hole was 175 yards to the pin so I hit my 6 iron and flew the green to the back bunker... 192 yards checked with my gps. I was wondering is there a general rule to adjust for elevation changes?

Anyone?

 

Thanks.

post #6 of 18

The International, a PGA Tour event discontinued after the 2006 season, was played at Castle Pines Golf Club near Denver, Colorado. Average elevation for the course was 6,300 feet. Some tour pros found that, in the high altitude, they could hit a 3W farther than a Driver.

_________________________

 

General rule on elevation changes and shot length:

  • A 10-foot drop in elevation from ball location to green adds about 10 yards to the shot.
  • A 10-foot rise in elevation from ball location to green cuts about 10 yards from the shot.

 

Note: Short irons, which hit the ball higher into the air, don't gain or lose quite as much as medium irons and woods.


Edited by WUTiger - 6/19/13 at 10:28pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

General rule on elevation changes and shot length:
  • A 10-foot drop in elevation from ball location to green adds about 10 yards to the shot.
  • A 10-foot rise in elevation from ball location to green cuts about 10 yards from the shot.

Note: Short irons, which hit the ball higher into the air, don't gain or lose quite as much as medium irons and woods.
That can't be right unless you're talking about skulled shots. Unless you meant write 10 yard rise cuts 10 feet in distance. I would buy that. I would also buy an even exchange .. 10 yards for 10 yards. But for it to be what you wrote the ball would have to be coming down at something like a 15 or 20 degree angle from horiz.
post #8 of 18

I believe i look this up on trackman once, the angle of impact is roughly upper 30's to 50 degree angle. Its about 1:1 ratio of yard of elevation to yard lost or gained. I find this to be pretty good estimate. Basically 45 degree angle gives you 1 up and 1 over for ball flight. Its a curve, though, but on trackman the apex of the golf ball (how high it goes, that distance up), is about the same as the distance left the ball has to travel horizontally.

post #9 of 18
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

I believe i look this up on trackman once, the angle of impact is roughly upper 30's to 50 degree angle. Its about 1:1 ratio of yard of elevation to yard lost or gained. I find this to be pretty good estimate. Basically 45 degree angle gives you 1 up and 1 over for ball flight. Its a curve, though, but on trackman the apex of the golf ball (how high it goes, that distance up), is about the same as the distance left the ball has to travel horizontally.

Yeah, that makes more sense.  I just checked the report from the one Trackman session I've ever done and I was around 40* landing angle with a 6 iron, so for ease of use, it seems like 1:1 is a good enough ratio to use as a baseline.

post #11 of 18

Useful info from PGATour.com:

 

--The wind: In general, every 10 mph of wind equates to one more or less club. If there’s a 10-mph wind in your face, opt for the 8-iron over the 9; conversely, if there’s a 20-mph wind behind you, choose your pitching wedge over a 9- or 8-iron.

 

--The temperature: The hotter it is outside, the farther the ball is going to carry. The cooler it is — i.e., early in the morning or late in the day—the less it’s going to carry. Also pay attention to the moisture on the ground because when it’s cool and damp out, you’re not going to get as much roll on the fairways as you will when the course has had a chance to dry out.

 

--The altitude: At higher altitudes, the air is thinner so the ball will move through it more efficiently; and, as such, will travel farther.

 

--Elevation: For every 10 yards of elevation (to an elevated green or one below your feet), add or subtract a full club. The lie of the ball can also play a factor—if you’re on a moderate to severe upslope, for instance, you may want to take one more club (i.e., a 6-iron vs. 7-iron), since the hill will tend to add loft to the club.

 

http://www.pgatour.com/instruction/instruction-choose-the-right-club.html

post #12 of 18

Now for extra credit:

 

How does high humidity affect the ball flight?  Further or shorter?

 

 

Key Final Jeopardy music now.........   e2_whistling.gif

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Now for extra credit:

 

How does high humidity affect the ball flight?  Further or shorter?

 

 

Key Final Jeopardy music now.........   e2_whistling.gif

 

Shorter?

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Now for extra credit:

 

How does high humidity affect the ball flight?  Further or shorter?

 

 

Key Final Jeopardy music now.........   e2_whistling.gif

Further. Strange but true.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post
General rule on elevation changes and shot length:
  • A 10-foot drop in elevation from ball location to green adds about 10 yards to the shot.
  • A 10-foot rise in elevation from ball location to green cuts about 10 yards from the shot.

do you mean a 10 YARD drop in elevantion = 10 yards added to the shot etc? or did you mean "foot"?

 

seems to differ from subsequent post:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post

 Its about 1:1 ratio of yard of elevation to yard lost or gained. I find this to be pretty good estimate.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post

 

Shorter?

 

Nope.   But you get style points for not Googling it just to get the right answer!  c2_beer.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post

Further. Strange but true.

 

Yep.  Ask any pilot.  Water vapor is less dense than dry air.

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Now for extra credit:

 

How does high humidity affect the ball flight?  Further or shorter?

 

 

Key Final Jeopardy music now.........   e2_whistling.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post

 

Shorter?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post

Further. Strange but true.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

 

Nope.   But you get style points for not Googling it just to get the right answer!  c2_beer.gif

 

 

Yep.  Ask any pilot.  Water vapor is less dense than dry air.

No way!  You're all wrong.  The actual correct answer is "Who are three people who have never been in my kitchen?"

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

Just in case nobody knows what the heck I'm talking about ... it's from an old Cheers episode, when Cliff goes on Jeopardy, answers every question correctly, then wagers all of his money on the final Jeopardy question (which was a list of three names), only to draw a blank and use the above as his answer.  Hey, he wasn't "technically" wrong. ;)

 

post #18 of 18
I don't even have to click on the spoiler link, Cliff. a3_biggrin.gif
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