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Hitting into a Net - Page 3

post #37 of 264
Thread Starter 

Incidentally, Dave and I have been talking lately about how well everyone at our indoor facility is practicing. They're no longer concerned with ball flight (they trust, know, and realize that the ball flight is going to sort itself out just fine if they keep improving) and are putting more and more effort towards actually making changes rather than trying to continue hitting the ball far and towards the targets. They're more easily making swings at 50% speed (i.e. not concerned with hitting the ball far with every swing) and are unconcerned with some shots struck poorly as they're working on making changes.

 

We've seen more improvement over the winter from our students and, we could argue, from ourselves than we've seen in the same amount of time over the summer months. It's been impressive, and it backs the theory or idea that started this thread.

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post #38 of 264

This same question may have been asked earlier in this thread (apologies for duplication), but could anyone recommend a good, outdoor net on the market? 

 

After reading Erik's initial post I feel the net offers a great solution to focusing on the swing and not the ball flight. I need to find consistency with a ball in front of me. I'm willing to work the net vs. range strategy...focus on my swing & not the ball path.

 

Thanks in advance for any net recommendations!

 

 

post #39 of 264

Agreed.  All I have been able to do is hit indoors or just swing in front of mirrors.  It definitely changes the focus entirely.  I am going to set up a net in my back yard so I can film my swing there instead of on the range.  It will be so much easier for filming.

 

I do miss taking divots though.

post #40 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Incidentally, Dave and I have been talking lately about how well everyone at our indoor facility is practicing. They're no longer concerned with ball flight (they trust, know, and realize that the ball flight is going to sort itself out just fine if they keep improving) and are putting more and more effort towards actually making changes rather than trying to continue hitting the ball far and towards the targets. They're more easily making swings at 50% speed (i.e. not concerned with hitting the ball far with every swing) and are unconcerned with some shots struck poorly as they're working on making changes.

 

We've seen more improvement over the winter from our students and, we could argue, from ourselves than we've seen in the same amount of time over the summer months. It's been impressive, and it backs the theory or idea that started this thread.


I've been trying to do this more at the range. Focus on the motion and the contact and don't even look up to watch the ball. 

 

Does feel like a bit of a waste of an 82 degree sunny day though. a1_smile.gif

 

post #41 of 264

That hurts Stretch!  It's 33 and snowing here!

post #42 of 264

I play better when I just think about my swing, watch video of it, and then just work on the swing without a ball, watching where the divot is. If I spend too much time at the range, it just makes my swing worse. Compensating for the wrong thing, getting too focused on power & distance, hitting the driver too much, etc. So I fully agree, in other words. Hitting a ball in a net is better, of course, but swinging without a ball can be OK too.

post #43 of 264

Well, I've taken the plunge and purchased a five foot square mat and a ten foot square net.  The mat is spring crimped nylon so I can hit down and through the ball, and it takes a standard tee.  That company is here in Georgia, so it could conceivably be here tomorrow.  The net is coming from a company in Washington, so it'll probably be a while.  Our deck is on the first floor and we have a walkout, daylight basement, so it's a perfect spot to hand the net.  And, when it gets cold, i can always use it indoors as well.  Can't wait to get my hands on it.

 

Oh yeah, and the best part is the cost.  The mat is $99.00 plus about $17.00 shipping and the net is $39.00 plus about $12.00 shipping.  So, for less that $175.00 I'll have a really awesome driving range all to myself.

post #44 of 264

+10000

 

I switched instructors this winter, and he's drastically changed my swing.  He's had me doing all my practice in front of mirrors at half speed and into nets, something my previous instructor said was a waste of time, "There's no mirrors on a golf course.".  New instructor said he doesn't want me to see or worry about ball flight until I have the swing in muscle memory.     I'd likely never stuck with the change if I was hitting balls at a range as I'm sure I'd have caved in and gone with hitting good looking shots instead of worrying about the proper technique.  He has taken a lot of video from when I first walked in and during my first two lessons and the changes to my swing are already significant. 

 

The experience also proved another phrase of yours to me, "Feel isn't real", as I swore I turned on a pivot in my old swing, but instead there was no pivot, just shifting my hips which explains the frequent fat and thin shots. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Incidentally, Dave and I have been talking lately about how well everyone at our indoor facility is practicing. They're no longer concerned with ball flight (they trust, know, and realize that the ball flight is going to sort itself out just fine if they keep improving) and are putting more and more effort towards actually making changes rather than trying to continue hitting the ball far and towards the targets. They're more easily making swings at 50% speed (i.e. not concerned with hitting the ball far with every swing) and are unconcerned with some shots struck poorly as they're working on making changes.

 

We've seen more improvement over the winter from our students and, we could argue, from ourselves than we've seen in the same amount of time over the summer months. It's been impressive, and it backs the theory or idea that started this thread.



 

post #45 of 264
Quote:

Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

 

 I swore I turned on a pivot in my old swing, but instead there was no pivot, just shifting my hips which explains the frequent fat and thin shots. 


 



 


That's the problem I faced before Stack and Tilt.  Hopefully the home set-up will help me really groove a swing with a pivot.  The mat and net are on their way!

 

post #46 of 264

I just bought one of these. http://www.golfsmith.com/s7_popup.php?render_set=298950_rn_____0_gsi&title=Hank%20Haney%20Monster%20Net&page=ps

and one of these. http://www.golfsmith.com/s7_popup.php?render_set=306368_rn_____0_gsi&title=Golf%20Gifts%20&%20Gallery%20Fairway/Rough%20Practice%20Mat&page=ps

 

Haven't used it much, but am going to start and take video with the HDgopro. 

 

I am really working on getting my shoulder plane a bit steeper and trying to get the feel of bringing the club inside->out by swinging in from 7 o'clock to 1 o'clock, instead of 5 o'clock->11 o'clock. It seems to be working with my 3wood and driver, but irons seem to get too deep, taking a bigger divot than i want. I am going to try to choke up on the club a bit more to see if that helps. 

 

I am hoping the net and mat will serve as a good training aid when working on my swing and making good ball contact.

post #47 of 264

  It sounds like you have the right idea as far as the mechanics of the swing. When you mentioned that it is working with the woods but not the irons, I would suggest using the video camera in a (DOWN THE LINE) view as well as (FACE ON). The swing plane is naturally effected due to the added length. Weight transfer and timing will make all of the difference as well. Keep in mind that timing in the release of the club will make a huge difference as wella2_wink.gif. Helpful hint with the camera, unless you have a High Speed camera, you will get better results if you put the camera a little farther away and zoom in rather than having it to close. It will capture more of the movement and appear more fluid.

Christopher Warner

Master Teaching Professional

Houston Texas

 

 

 

post #48 of 264

  One very simple thing that will help in avoiding fat shots which is simply caused from holding the weight back or late movement forward, is to insure that the rear knee connects with the front knee at the end of the swing. If you purposely connect the two, you'll find that fat shots will go away. It's not possible to make this connection and still hold the weight back. Stack and Tilt has a good principal, however it complicates the issue and bogs the mind down with to many things to remember. Keep it simple, remember ONE thing. Connect the knees. This is a confirmation of weight being transferred and a total commitment to the shot.

Christopher Warner

Master Teaching Professional

Houston Texas

post #49 of 264
Thread Starter 

Christopher,

 

Please begin using quoting (and multiquoting) when responding as most people will have no idea who "you" are when you post a couple of times in a row and don't quote anybody.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by golfballs01 View Post

Stack and Tilt has a good principal, however it complicates the issue and bogs the mind down with to many things to remember.

 

I think you'll find plenty of people who would disagree with you on that.

post #50 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfballs01 View Post

Stack and Tilt has a good principal, however it complicates the issue and bogs the mind down with to many things to remember.

 


Isn't this the case in any type of golf swing? The golf swing is a complicated motion requiring the golfer to remember quite a lot of things (especially at address and if the golfer is a newbie).

 

At least with S&T, you are remembering a list of important actions to do that are at least CORRECT as they are based on research and sound principles.
 

 

post #51 of 264
All the info is what instructors and students wanting to learn more needs to worry about. If someone, as a student, don't want a whole lot of information, the instructor can relay the needed parts without going into too much details. This is true for any golf swing and any teaching method. I'd say S&T is, if anything, easier than a lot of the other stuff out there.
post #52 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfballs01 View Post

Stack and Tilt has a good principal, however it complicates the issue and bogs the mind down with to many things to remember. Keep it simple,

 

I completey disagree with you.  In fact, Stack n Tilt does keep things simple.

 

Maybe you should learn more about the SnT method to see that this is the case.

 

 

post #53 of 264
Thread Starter 

Let's do our best to stick to the topic (hitting into a net) please. My fault, I know, but now I'm trying to make amends with this post. :)

post #54 of 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfballs01 View Post

  It sounds like you have the right idea as far as the mechanics of the swing. When you mentioned that it is working with the woods but not the irons, I would suggest using the video camera in a (DOWN THE LINE) view as well as (FACE ON). The swing plane is naturally effected due to the added length. Weight transfer and timing will make all of the difference as well. Keep in mind that timing in the release of the club will make a huge difference as wella2_wink.gif. Helpful hint with the camera, unless you have a High Speed camera, you will get better results if you put the camera a little farther away and zoom in rather than having it to close. It will capture more of the movement and appear more fluid.

Christopher Warner

Master Teaching Professional

Houston Texas

 

 

 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by golfballs01 View Post

  One very simple thing that will help in avoiding fat shots which is simply caused from holding the weight back or late movement forward, is to insure that the rear knee connects with the front knee at the end of the swing. If you purposely connect the two, you'll find that fat shots will go away. It's not possible to make this connection and still hold the weight back. Stack and Tilt has a good principal, however it complicates the issue and bogs the mind down with to many things to remember. Keep it simple, remember ONE thing. Connect the knees. This is a confirmation of weight being transferred and a total commitment to the shot.

Christopher Warner

Master Teaching Professional

Houston Texas


Thanks, for the tips1. the camera use is the HDGoPro, at 1080 and 60fps, so no worries about capturing the swing!

 

The SNT, I find, was way easier for me to remember, and control the feel of what I was doing. Before that I looked like an octopus falling out of a tree. At least this way I am hitting better shots, and making more consistent contact.

 

This is why I am using the net to practice these things for now, regardless of ball flight.

 

BTW guys, I believe he was replying to me, but yes, quotes are preferred  ;-)

 

 

 

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