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Grip Pressure - Page 2

post #19 of 111
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieGolfer77 View Post

Question, would a nice tacky grip give someone the confidence to relax their kungfu grip on the club? My brother holds the club to darn hard, he needs some motivation. Or a swift kick in the read!

 

Did you read the first post?

 

The grip should be firm, but the wrists and forearms loose.

post #20 of 111

 

Quote:

Is optimal pressure 50-50 for left and right hands throughout the swing?

I really started to playing with grip pressures last season and found (for righty's) if I grip the right hand more say a 60/40 right hand/ left hand it helped with keep more control. Its weird at first because I have less of my grip physcally on the club with more more pressure. The more pressure I have with my left hand the better the chance I have to keep the club face open becuase I will lock my wrist/forearm.
 

post #21 of 111

I find that grip pressure is influenced by a multitude of different factors. Stress and or aggression is the number one culprit though. I have seen some pretty good information and believe that they all have a part in understanding and solving the grip situation. The natural things is to hold on tighter when swinging harder. As mentioned at the beginning of this string of comments though, holding the club more in the fingers instead of deep in the hands is a great start. When one is going to throw a baseball, they don't hold it in the palm, they hold it in the fingers. That's where you have more control, feel, and flexibility. It also allows for a smoother release. Having grips that are hard, warn, or old doesn't help either. I do like the tacky grips that have been introduces for that reason. The grip is a big factor as well. One must find a grip that feels comfortable and trusted before they can ease up on it. I prefer the interlock just because it feels more like I am still holding the club tighter than I really am. It feels locked in if you will. Keep in mind the tapered end of the grip as well. The waggle is great for removing tension in the arms as well as letting the muscles anticipate a particular motion that they will be making. One last thing that I have found that really helps is to grip the club with it pointing at the sky right in front of my face instead of having to bend over the club and contort to the club. Bring it into your comfort zone, establish the grip, then lower the club into the address position. It helps the hands go on the club in complete comfort. One other thing that never seems to ever creep into conversations is going through a checklist prior to addressing the ball. It's called a (Pre Shot Routine) One should never ever think over the ball. It only tenses the person up and allows doubt to creep in. Do all of the thinking behind the ball, commit to the swing thought, and then address and execute.

Christopher Warner

Master Teaching Professional

Houston Texas 

post #22 of 111

Big T,

It may seem like you have better control with the back hand favoring 60/40, however this is what leads to a PUSH shot or hit, vs a Swing. The forward hand should be completely in control of the swing for several reasons. First of all the club should be an extension of the forward arm, thus having the club striking the ball in a downward strike due to the club achieving APEX or the bottom of the arc just beyond the ball. Afterwords, of course, the club would be traveling back up and around to finish the swing. The rear hand is the one we usually trust the most and so we tend to allow it to do the heavy duty work. It feels as though we are applying more power to the club and creating more power in the swing. As strange as it may seem though, it doesn't work that way. Power itself is not actually physical strength as most people think, it's another word in place of technique. Look a Bubba Watson. He's as skinny as they come but he hits farther than anybody else. It comes down to holding the angle established at the top of the back swing between the forward arm, relatively straight, and the cocking of the club. Holding that angle through the down swing until the hands reach a point just outside the back pocket. It's then that the club is released and the hands rotate through the impact zone. Think of cracking a whip. It's not strength that makes it pop, it's stored energy being released at a given point in time. That's why it looks like the touring pros look like they're swinging so easy but hitting it so far. It's all technique. Try swinging with only the forward hand and keep the other off of the club. At first it will feel like the club is heavy but let the hips do the swinging, and you'll get the feeling that you should have during the actual swing. Trust the forward hand and arm to take the load. You'll be surprised at how much more control you will have and how much less energy you will need to make an aggressive swing. Be sure to connect the back knee to the forward knee on the finish of the swing which will indicate that you got all of your weight forward and committed to the shot. I certainly hope that this helps you and that you are successful in your golf.

Christopher Warner

Master Teaching Professional

post #23 of 111
Thread Starter 

Christopher, what's the role of the rear hand? Do you believe it contributes nothing in terms of power to the golf swing? Why? What proof do you have of this, and what do you say to the many documents and studies which show otherwise? What do you think Ben Hogan meant when he said he wished he had three right hands (and arms)?

 

Also, please quote people when responding. It's helpful. I didn't quote you here because I have some general questions and your post is directly above mine.

post #24 of 111

If you think in terms of shooting a rifle, if done correctly, you would do the work with the rear arm. You hold the weight up, shoulder it, and pull the trigger. You won't see people firing the rifle with only one arm but the forward arm is used to steady the rifle. I the same mindset, you wouldn't see a golfer playing with only one hand. The rear hand does play a part in the swing but people tend to let it dominate the swing. When this happens, the club tends to bottom out behind the ball. I have been playing 43 years and wasn't shown this until later in life. I reached a point where I was playing pretty good but had reached a plateau. Once I learned the difference and made the necessary changes, my game improved significantly. I used to hit my 8 iron about 150 yards max when it was struck good. After learning to trap the ball and trust the forward hand, I reached a whole new level. I can hit a 56 degree wedge 150 without jumping from my shoes. When it comes to working the ball in either direction and changing the loft without having to make changes in the swing, this technique really comes into play. I too am right handed but I like to refer to the rear hand for the sake of left handed players. I teach a lot of tennis players and they too agree in this thought process. The rear hand does play a vital part in stabilization in the swing as well as feel. I believe that is what Ben Hogan was referring to in his Five Lessons. If you think about it, why does the forward hand grip the club, and then the rear hand overlap it. In the grip, the pinkie, next to the pinkie, and middle finger of the forward hand grip the club where on the rear hand, the middle finger and the next to pinkie hold the club. This is also why the forward wrist is straight at impact, and the rear hand is cupped. It's to stabilize the position of the club at impact and through the ball. If it sounded like I was suggesting that the rear hand didn't play a part, I must have come across incorrectly.

Christopher Warner  

post #25 of 111

Quote:

It may seem like you have better control with the back hand favoring 60/40, however this is what leads to a PUSH shot or hit, vs a Swing. The forward hand should be completely in control of the swing for several reasons.

 

 

Confused on the last 2 post, I will clarify:

 

My rear hand (left) is at 40ish%. My bottom hand (right) is at 60%. I typically grip, like your post says with mainly my fingers with my (right) bottom hand.

 

When I grip with and equal 50/50 grip my hands fight each other and I tend to keep the club face open. I look at it as my right hand (bottom) is dominate, leading the rotation of the club face.

 

By all means, if I am correcting something that Im doing wrong feel free to chime in. I did a lot of playing around with my grip pressures this pass season and doing this improved my consistency.

 

 

post #26 of 111

I do understand what you are saying and the right hand will make it seem easier to rotate the club through the impact zone. One thing to make sure of is that the (Vs) are pointing at a area between the right cheek and the center of the right shoulder. I see a lot of players that have the right hand behind the club where the V is pointing back and the forward hand V is too far forward. If this happens, the back hand is the only one that has a chance of rotating correctly. That's very common. Try bringing the left hand a little more on top of the club where the V is more to the back shoulder. See if that doesn't help in the rotation.

Christopher Warner

post #27 of 111

Quote:

 right hand behind the club where the V is pointing back and the forward hand V is too far forward

Funny you mention that because I catch myself doing that same thing, usually latter in the round.

 

Back to grip pressure, the hole subject can be confusing. Ask people about it and you get several answers from firm to light to enough that you don't throw the club OB.

 

That's why I went out and began playing with the grip pressure from left firm, right firm, both etc... Until I found that happy medium and my swing and score improved.

 

Granted I am not a pro, instructor or a scratch golfer. But, I do think with forget the significance of finding our ideal grip pressure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #28 of 111

Back to grip pressure, the hole subject can be confusing. Ask people about it and you get several answers from firm to light to enough that you don't throw the club OB.

 

That's why I went out and began playing with my grip pressure from left firm, right firm, both etc... Until I found that happy medium and my swing and score improved.

 

Granted I am not a pro, instructor or a scratch golfer. But, I do think we forget the significance of finding our ideal grip pressure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #29 of 111

I agree with you completely. Comfort is key to achieving consistency. I find that baseball players suffer more than anyone else in this area because they tend to be aggressive with the hand that they trust the most, the rear hand. They let it take over. It causes great tension in the wrists as well as the forearms and inhibits a proper release. If you've found a balance between your two hands, you've done well. I believe that you will find success in your game. 

post #30 of 111

Ian woosnam had, 30 at setup, 30 at turn and 30 at impact.

a lesser tour pro, think nationwide tour will have a lot higher at impact slowing down the swing.

Griptouch is different, however the wrists and hands if kept light will allow a increased speed at impact and straighter shots.

Most amatures have to tight especially at impact think "hit" impulse.

 

My griptouch is light, if it rains I need gloves or I would loose the club.

Tour pros has the same trouble when it rains due to their grip simply is so light they slip out of position.

 

 

post #31 of 111

I am right handed. I have been taught to have a firm grip with my last 3 fingers and wrap the club not in the palm of the hand, but wrap the meaty part over. The right hand is there to guide and that is all. Wrists, arms and shoulders should be loose like wet noodles. It all follows the rotation of your hips and I'll be darned if it doesn't work... simplicity of the golf swing.

post #32 of 111

I have only been golfing for a few months now, and found out my first round at the driving range, I was gripping way to hard. Being it was my first time, I didn't have a glove, and got three blisters. I'm a righty and my worst blister was on my right hand, my non glove hand anyway. I have since had to buy gloves for both hands and almost get blisters threw my gloves in two spots.

 

I was kind of wondering if a blister or callus ever forms on the right thumb of right hand golfers? I know I'm gripping way to hard and even while working on my grip and wearing a glove on my right hand, I have a callus on my right thumb lol.

post #33 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo Slice View Post

I have only been golfing for a few months now, and found out my first round at the driving range, I was gripping way to hard. Being it was my first time, I didn't have a glove, and got three blisters. I'm a righty and my worst blister was on my right hand, my non glove hand anyway. I have since had to buy gloves for both hands and almost get blisters threw my gloves in two spots.

 

Blisters don't necessarily mean you were gripping the club too tightly. Oftentimes they mean the opposite, and the grip is moving around in your hands.

post #34 of 111

Awesome thread. I just did a few practice swings where the only pressure points were the fingers of both hands on the club, and it felt really weird.  I've also taken the putter and done the opposite.  I've taken a grip more in the palm and put pressure where my thumbs are to try and get solid wrists.  Am I way off base with this?

post #35 of 111

eh if i tighten my grip I tighten my muscles with screw me over almost all of the time so I like a soft grip...also the blisters is from moving the hands on the grip to make the v's and other shit point in the right direction

post #36 of 111

A key aspect to remember is a player’s optimal grip pressure is relative to the individual’s physical composition.  The amount of grip pressure necessary for a fluid and consistent golf swing is relative to the golfer’s physical make up.  Going on the assumption you have achieved a proper grip technique….  What all players should work towards is maintaining a constant pressure throughout the swing motion. It is physically impossible to grip the club loosely throughout the swing motion. Gripping the club loosely at address will guarantee a spike in grip pressure during your motion. Conversely, too tight at address and a mechanically forceful and rigid swing is inevitable. As indicated in the second post in this thread there is a direct correlation with bad golf and erratic grip pressure.  Don’t get the word “firm” confused with” tight”—constantly firm is what I strive for in every full swing.  Keep in mind being able to maintain a constant pressure will not happened over night— better golfers are able to maintain this relaxed consistently firm grip throughout the swing motion because of a fundamentally sound grip and lots of repetition.

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