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Adjustments on TaylorMade RBZ driver?? - Page 2

post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue72ss View Post

 

 

The video I posted was of Taylormade stating that the R11 was in half degree increments.


Yes, the R11 in the video is in 0.5 degree increments, like I just said above.  The RBZ and R11s are in 0.75 degree increments, which is what the tuning tool is directed at. 

 

The settings between the two different models are the same, just the degrees of loft different.

post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by moparman426 View Post


Yes, the R11 in the video is in 0.5 degree increments, like I just said above.  The RBZ and R11s are in 0.75 degree increments, which is what the tuning tool is directed at. 

 

The settings between the two different models are the same, just the degrees of loft different.

 

You actually said R9, that is why I made my post.

 

This post you made it clear that the R11 and R11s are different, thank you.

 

I still think it is absolute horse shit that they advertise and market the shit out of the adjustability of these things and then it turns out the shaft is not even marked properly.

 

If I want to go up just 0.75 degrees from standard, and maintain the standard lie angle, I need to have the grip of the club on the ground with shaft pointed up and use one "notch" or "click" to the right of the word "lower" that is printed on the shaft.  Now how in the hell would I have ever figured that out if someone didnt post that link tunetaylormade.com?  And I'm still just going by the fact that I can barely make out the word "lower" in the illustration, and if history repeats itself I'm not even certain how correct or thourough taylormade was with that picture.

 

Additionally the instruction booklet and worldwide marketing tour do not mention anything about lie angle, it focuses on loft, open/closed, and the small weights to change flight.

 

They must have done all this marketing but not thought anyone would care to actually use the adjustability to its potential.

post #21 of 32

I think what they are/were counting on is the fact that once a person has their club set to where it better suits their swing, they wouldn't need to adjust it again.  They would never come straight out and state that fact, as it would defeat the whole purpose of their "innovation".  Their lack of information leads me to believe that they expected the consumers to actually experiment with the club settings on their own, giving them (consumers) the feeling that they are actually getting something that is going to help them play better, and convince them that the technology they paid for was warranted.  The only reason I bought mine is to have the ability to quickly and easily swap out shafts.  Truth be told.... I would have bought a Titleist 910 model if the price was even remotely close to the R9 when I bought it.  It was either the 910 or pay the same amount and get a driver and a much needed 3w.

post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by moparman426 View Post

I think what they are/were counting on is the fact that once a person has their club set to where it better suits their swing, they wouldn't need to adjust it again.  They would never come straight out and state that fact, as it would defeat the whole purpose of their "innovation".  Their lack of information leads me to believe that they expected the consumers to actually experiment with the club settings on their own, giving them (consumers) the feeling that they are actually getting something that is going to help them play better, and convince them that the technology they paid for was warranted.  The only reason I bought mine is to have the ability to quickly and easily swap out shafts.  Truth be told.... I would have bought a Titleist 910 model if the price was even remotely close to the R9 when I bought it.  It was either the 910 or pay the same amount and get a driver and a much needed 3w.

 

I have the R9 TP Motore Fujikura shaft for sale (65g stiff).

 

I sold the R9 but the guy didnt want to wait until my wife got home with the extra shaft in her car, I had both the normal stiff shaft and also the TP shaft.  I'd give it to you for $20 if you want it, I have pics if you want to give me your email.

post #23 of 32
Start a Marketplace ad if you want, don't use threads to sell things.
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Start a Marketplace ad if you want, don't use threads to sell things.

 

Its OK dont worry about it

post #25 of 32

Hello All,

 

I have owned an RBZ 2012 for about 2 months now and till now have left it as its factory default. I agree that the markings and information on adjustment is inadequate to say the least. In fact in comparing the following two websites, http://taylormadegolf.com/TaylorMade/RocketBallz-Driver/DW-JN737,en_US,pd.html?start=4&cgid=taylormade-drivers-rbz and http://tunetaylormade.com/#rbz-landing they give conflicting information on the hozel positioning. Taking the genuine Taylor Made website as gospel (the former of the two addresses) and reading about lie angles, I have generated a more user friendly approach to the available settings and expected results from each setting.

 

The factory default setting is whereby the hozel text reads "STD LOFT" is aligned with the arrow on the club head heel. This promotes a lie angle of 59.5deg and a loft angle of 9.5deg for my RBZ (NB: please refer to the Taylor Made website for the defaults of different models i.e.10.5, HL, TOUR etc, etc.).

 

The club loft angle is adjustable up to +/-1.5deg in 0.75deg increments. However, in adjusting the loft angle, the angle of the club face is adjusted simultaneously (+/-3deg), to promote either a closed face or open face (draw or fade respectively). However, Taylor Made have not published by how much this angle is for each setting, but I believe we can assume it is proportional to the loft adustments

 

The club lie angle is also adjustable. However, Taylor Made have not published by how much this angle is, nor if it is incremental, but simply refer to it as more "upright" from the standard. The more upright lie angle promotes a slight draw spin and/or hook effect on the ball.

 

Referring to the below chart, these are all eight of the available settings for the RBZ 9.5 (NB: again you will need to adjust the data to suit your specific RBZ model). Setting 0 is the factory default whereby the hozel text reads "STD LOFT" is aligned with the arrow on the club head heel. Setting number 1 is one turn clockwise from factory default; setting 2 is two turns from factory default, and so on and so forth.

 

0. Lie=STD Loft= 9.5
1. Lie=STD Loft= +0.75 (totalling 10.25)
2. Lie=STD Loft= +1.50 (totalling 11.00)
3. Lie=UPR Loft= 9.5
4. Lie=UPR Loft= -0.75 (totalling 8.75)
5. Lie=UPR Loft= +0.75 (totalling 10.25)
6. Lie=STD Loft= -1.50 (totalling 8.00)
7. Lie=STD Loft= -0.75 (totalling 8.75)

 

Taking into consideration the loft, face and lie angle of each of the 8 available pre-set settings above, I presume the flight (down the target line) is illustrated as per the below diagram. Each flight is numbered in connection to the relevant setting, i.e. setting 0 above, flies as path 0 below (provided your swing mechanics are sound).

 

 

If your swing mechanics are not sound, you can use this data to your advantage. For instance, if you regularly slice the ball then try setting 2 to accommodate your faulty swing (however it would be better to get some lessons to improve your swing mechanics, as a slice with a driver means your Irons are off too, although are not as noticeable till you have a blade in your hands). If however your swing mechanics are sound and you want more distance, select setting 6, however be mindful to address the ball for a slight fade, i.e. aim to the left of target.

 

Now I'm off to the range to put this theory into practice! Will report back if all is incorrect!

Many thanks,

Guy

post #26 of 32

When it comes down to it the actual unit of change makes no difference in the real world. Hit it. If it needs a change, change it to where it needs to be to get the the ball flight you want. Units are irrelevant.

post #27 of 32

I did spend a couple of ours on the range today hitting balls in all eight shaft positions and found the loft was as described in literature provided by Taylor Made and on this site. 99

percent of balls were straight.  Few either sliced or hooked slightly, which makes me wonder if in fact the face angle changes in any of the eight positions.  Carefully marking each of the eight positions, I could not detect any change in face angle.  I also could not any mention of face angle change on Taylor Made's web site concerning the RBZ.  Can anyone direct me to information concerning face angles?

post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigben15 View Post

I did spend a couple of ours on the range today hitting balls in all eight shaft positions and found the loft was as described in literature provided by Taylor Made and on this site. 99

percent of balls were straight.  Few either sliced or hooked slightly, which makes me wonder if in fact the face angle changes in any of the eight positions.  Carefully marking each of the eight positions, I could not detect any change in face angle.  I also could not any mention of face angle change on Taylor Made's web site concerning the RBZ.  Can anyone direct me to information concerning face angles?


On the TM system, the face angle changes are double that of the loft adjustment.  For example, if you were to adjust the loft to 0.5 degrees up, then the face will be closing a full degree.  My R9 Supertri shafts have the RBZ tips, so when I set the driver loft to +1.5 degrees, the face closes 3.0 degrees.  I dislike closed face drivers, but still want to have the ability to adjust the loft/swap out shafts, so I have a 910D3 on it's way.  I mean, I usually end up rotating the club back to square/slightly open at address anyway, but that feels like I a defeating the purpose of the adjustments I made to the club.

post #29 of 32
I just purchased the RBZ driver and I searched the net learning to tune it. From what I have figured don't look at the lofts. Just hit every single loft until you find your perfect swing and ball flight. Trying to use your brain is a waste of time. Just go out and hit 60-75 balls alternating the lofts and find what is best for you. Just like in the game of golf if you spend more time thinking than actually hitting balls you will never get the results you want. Plus you want to know what every loft does so you can set your driver to also fit the track you are playing that day.
post #30 of 32

I picked up a used RBZ 9.5 in good shape at my local club. I finally understand all the 8 loft and lie adjustments thanks to guyrichies post. I removed the grip and it's marked Fujikura. That a good shaft???

 

The shaft that came with the club us a "S" and it flexed out at 261cpm. I'm more comfortable @ 253cpm so I'm going to change the shaft.

 

My question is:

 

How do you install a pured the shaft with an adjustable hozel? Sounds like I have to find my optimum hozel setting then install the shaft?

 

Need some help :-)

post #31 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfer6760 View Post


 

My question is:

 

How do you install a pured the shaft with an adjustable hozel? Sounds like I have to find my optimum hozel setting then install the shaft?

 

Need some help :-)

That is correct.

post #32 of 32

Can the weight ports be replaced in the RBZ clubs? If so can you buy different size weights?

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