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How did you fix your slice? - Page 6

post #91 of 261

And still one more (you should be able to tell that this has always been a problem for me; I've listened to every witchdoctor out there!)e3_rolleyes.gif

 

I used to compensate for the slice by just aiming more to the left of the fairway.  Makes sense right - fix a banana ball right by aiming more to the left?

 

The problem I had was that I started the swing out of alignment- Standing at the tee box and aiming left, I had a habit of having my shoulders aiming aligned to left (open), and when I went through my swing I was even more open than before, and really was OTT.  The morale of the story is make sure your shoulders are aligned right 

post #92 of 261

Just sat out there and tried to hook it. After trying enough, I did it. Then I turned it down a litte and poof. Little draw, rather straight. Sometime habits kicks in and I get a BIG fade (baby slice). But I just tried over and over trying to do something different. Can't do same thing and expect a different result, ya know?

post #93 of 261

As an ex-baseball player, I always tell people to try and hit the ball at the second baseman. Not second base but the second base position. Most slicers are swinging down the left field line and leave the club face open and voila, banana ball. Going at the second baseman will help you swing from the inside more. At first you will hit push slices and think that its now worse but from there you should start to work on squaring the club up and feel the right timing for when to bring it back to the left. IN to OUT can be just as bad as OUT to IN but you have to start with IN and then work towards finishing IN as well and swinging to the second baseman will help you with that.

 

Good Luck.

post #94 of 261

i saw a video once where an instructor was talking about lee trevino, and how trevino always used a very open stance.  he said this was actually a good drill to stop hitting slices, because when you're set up open, you can't come across the top as easily.  you have to keep the club coming more down the line, almost blocking it, towards the target.  so the instruction went, this encouraged you to stop swinging over the top.

post #95 of 261

When I first started playing I had a terrible slice with driver and long irons, and being self-taught I just read everything I could find on the swing and on faults.  I fixed mine by laying out clubs on the ground to check my alignment, watched my swing in a mirror to ensure my plane and path were good, and started gripping the club more in my fingers and a little stronger.  I used to hit buckets and buckets of balls every day and I eventually got to the point I could draw and fade on command about 75% of the time.  I just weaken my grip a little and open my stance for a high fade, then close my stance and strengthen my grip for a draw. 

post #96 of 261
After a 10yr layoff from the game, my draw disappeared from my woods and was replaced by a fade when I was lucky not to slice. I can't fade my irons very well but I sure can draw them.

I realized that I was standing too close / swinging too steep with my woods. To adjust for the proper swing plane for he longer shaft, I stood further away from the ball.

I now sp,t my wood tee shots between fade, straight to a slight pull - in that order of possible outcome. b3_huh.gif

BTW- I was unable to fade my irons until I started standing a little closer to the ball. b2_tongue.gif
post #97 of 261

I used to have this problem as well. I would have to aim as far to the left as possible without being in trouble if I accidentally hit it straight. That was back when I was a 20 handicap. Since then I have dropped to a 5 (would be lower if i could putt). What i have done is a combination of a few easy things i suggest trying 1 at a time and in varying degrees before combining them as you don't want to go from 1 extreme to another.

 

1) Option 1: Take your normal stance and address the ball. Now take your front foot (nearest the target) and move it forward (towards the ball). Take your normal swing. This will feel awkward, but it helps to influence a Draw and therefore will lessen the slice.

 

2) Option 2: Grip the Club as normal and address the ball. Now take your lower hand and roll it away from your target so your palm faces up to the sky. This will make you flip your wrists more and encourage a draw, again will help lessen a slice.

 

3) Option 3: Take your normal stance. Now take a small step back away from the ball (0.5" -1" at a time). Swing normal. Moving back will hopefully cause you to hit the ball a little more on the Toe of the club with should draw the ball. (it will also allow you to fully extend your arms and may gain you some distance).

 

4) Option 4: If in your normal stance, while at address, there is an angel between your arms and the shaft of the club (i.e. your arms are more pointed to the ground while the shaft of the club is pointed at the ball) try raising your arms so that your arms and the shaft are in a straighter line pointing down to the ball. This should help create a draw.

 

5) Option 5: My last suggestion is only if you can't manage to do it any other way, but you can always purchase a club that has a closed face. I am against this because it makes it difficult to switch clubs later, or if you do end up fixing your swing the club will become just as big a problem creating a hook.

 

Using a small combination of these tips has made me move to a club that is actually 2* open and hitting it further than most people i play with.

 

Hopefully one of these (or a combination) tips will help straighten out your ball flight as well. Good luck. see you at the 19th hole.

post #98 of 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason M Henley View Post

As an ex-baseball player, I always tell people to try and hit the ball at the second baseman. Not second base but the second base position. Most slicers are swinging down the left field line and leave the club face open and voila, banana ball. Going at the second baseman will help you swing from the inside more. At first you will hit push slices and think that its now worse but from there you should start to work on squaring the club up and feel the right timing for when to bring it back to the left. IN to OUT can be just as bad as OUT to IN but you have to start with IN and then work towards finishing IN as well and swinging to the second baseman will help you with that.

 

Good Luck.


I totally agree. When i really want to crush the ball i always tell myself to "swing for right field". Same thing your saying...

post #99 of 261

Easiest cure for the slice is as follows (worked for me when I was 13), courtesy of Harvey Penick:

 

1)  Imagine you're playing baseball and at bat. 

2)  Aim at the second baseman.

3)  Try to hit the ball over the shortstop.

 

Works like a charm.

post #100 of 261

So, let me get this right, your aiming over 2nd baseman, meaing aim right, and hit the ball to the left Meaing you want to hit a pull.

post #101 of 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by cougar978 View Post

Easiest cure for the slice is as follows (worked for me when I was 13), courtesy of Harvey Penick:

1)  Imagine you're playing baseball and at bat. 
2)  Aim at the second baseman.
3)  Try to hit the ball over the shortstop.

Works like a charm.

Maybe for a lefty...?
post #102 of 261

i dont like to completely change my set up and swing, if something goes wrong i try to change small pieces.

 

This time it was my grip, my grip has always been very open and my bottom (right hand) is always open.  To solve my slice all it took was to push my hand over and my thumb now sits over on the left side of the grip (actually i can get a nice wee draw from it now)

post #103 of 261

forced myself to go INSIDE -> OUT on the backswing, instead of the more natural feeling outside->in swing.   S&T methodology also helped - keeping the head centered.

post #104 of 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post

 

Troy and Osten A1 caddy.jpg

 

 

Curious, I've tried to flare the feet - feels so awkward to me.    Can you tell me what is the reason for flaring the feet ?      Aside from feeling awkward, it totally messes up my alignment & if I do hit it well, it doesn't go where I want it to - to me squaring up the feet perpindicular to where I want it to go is key to my alignment.   Thanks !

post #105 of 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post

 

Curious, I've tried to flare the feet - feels so awkward to me.    Can you tell me what is the reason for flaring the feet ?      Aside from feeling awkward, it totally messes up my alignment & if I do hit it well, it doesn't go where I want it to - to me squaring up the feet perpindicular to where I want it to go is key to my alignment.   Thanks !

 

Only feels awkward because you didn't start this way a2_wink.gif

 

Feet flare does two main things:

1. Allows for greater movement of the hips on the backswing.  Try seeing how far you can turn with a "square" right foot compared to it turned out.

2. Allows the left knee to flex forward and to a greater degree on the downswing.  This gets the lower center forward on the downswing and how you hit the ball high and far.

 

See a lot of golfers with square feet slide the hips back, we want to turn then on the backswing.

 

For more info go here http://thesandtrap.com/t/56392/flaring-the-back-foot#post_689704

 

Good example here of an online lesson, beginning golfer starting with good information.  Yes stance is a little too wide on the right but still illustrates the point.

Foot flare vs no foot flare 1.jpg

 

 

feet flare vs no feet flare 2.jpg

post #106 of 261

i just strengthened my grip, it was a lot easier to fix than i imagined
 

post #107 of 261
Thread Starter 

I've had success the past two times I went to the driving range. I concentrated more on releasing the club/ turning my arms over at impact. It takes a lot of timing, but it works. If I could only give one tip, it would be to concentrate on turning your right hand over your left at the moment of impact. If this doesn't work after five minutes of trying, let me know.

post #108 of 261

I fixed my slice last year by working on something very similar to what mvmac said in the following post below. I also upgraded my driver to something a little more forgiving, which also has a shaft that is more fitting to my swing speed/type. I generally have a slight fade now, but I am capable of a very minimal draw at times as well. (Slight fade to me, meaning <10 yards). Oh, I also stopped using balls such as the Penta and Pro V because I am not nearly good enough to control them properly - or even benefit from the cost/advanced technology. I typically use a 2 piece such as a Slazenger when I'm playing a course for the first time... or I'll go back to a Srixon Q-Star at my home course. On most days, I actually found myself to be less accurate with a tour ball because I don't have control of the club face to properly control trajectory, spin, or anything else for that matter - especially and mostly off of the driver.

 

Try to take a look at what club you are having issues with. If it's your driver, look at your shaft and go to a fitting. I'm sure Eric and co. will agree that anyone who is considering taking golf seriously should have a proper fitting so that they can learn to swing the proper club, properly. 


http://thesandtrap.com/t/58339/how-did-you-fix-your-slice#post_715869

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