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The Best (worst) Spelling and Grammar Errors Thread - Page 31

post #541 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

lol, I just stumbled across the post in question. I would have went with, "86 the 'tude dude."

Which begs the next question ...

 

Is it "went with" or "gone with?" ;)

post #542 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Which begs the next question ...

Is it "went with" or "gone with?" ;)

Gee..I dunno...
post #543 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Which begs the next question ...

 

Is it "went with" or "gone with?" ;)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

Gee..I dunno...

My wife and I have similar issues with "take" and "bring."  (She uses "bring" more often than I think is appropriate ;))

post #544 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Which begs the next question ...

 

Is it "went with" or "gone with?" ;)

 

Gone with. I have nothing to back it up, other than it sounding more gooder.

post #545 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

 

 

My wife and I have similar issues with "take" and "bring."  (She uses "bring" more often than I think is appropriate ;))

 

I would say "take" when you're taking something away. "Take off your bra."

 

I would say "bring" when you're bringing or adding something. "Don't forget to bring the condoms."

 

You could say "Don't forget to take the condoms." but to me, that implies that you don't have them. So is it based on ownership?

 

Again, nothing to back myself up with besides common sense and sounding more gooder.

post #546 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

 

 

My wife and I have similar issues with "take" and "bring."  (She uses "bring" more often than I think is appropriate ;))

 

I think it would mostly depend on context.  You bring something with you when arriving.  You take something with you when leaving.  

 

Generally speaking, of course.  I'm sure there are exceptions.

post #547 of 1115
I'm going to swing by the Chinese place for some 'bring out.'

I don't bring shit from nobody.

Lol, sorry...drinking...
post #548 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by bplewis24 View Post
 

 

I think it would mostly depend on context.  You bring something with you when arriving.  You take something with you when leaving.

 

Generally speaking, of course.  I'm sure there are exceptions.

The particular scenario that I give her grief over is when, for example, my wife puts something by my wallet and tells me "Don't forget to bring that to work with you tomorrow."  If she was coming with me, or was going to be at my office when I got there, maybe bring makes sense.  Without either of those being the case, take sounds right to me.  "More gooder," as Slice would say. ;)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post
 

 

I would say "take" when you're taking something away. "Take off your bra."

 

I would say "bring" when you're bringing or adding something. "Don't forget to bring the condoms."

 

You could say "Don't forget to take the condoms." but to me, that implies that you don't have them. So is it based on ownership?

 

Again, nothing to back myself up with besides common sense and sounding more gooder.

LOL as to where your mind is. ;)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

I'm going to swing by the Chinese place for some 'bring out.'

I don't bring shit from nobody.

Lol, sorry...drinking...

Why are you apologizing?  I just hope its good wine. ;)

post #549 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

I'm going to swing by the Chinese place for some 'bring out.'

I don't bring shit from nobody.

Lol, sorry...drinking...

 

"Take-out" is a colloquialism.  And it still fits because you are "taking" it "out."  The perspective is from the store/restaurant you are taking it from.

 

 And the "from" in your 2nd sentence is a dead give-away that you should be using "take".  It illustrates that the perspective (or the subject) is the person you are taking it away from.  

post #550 of 1115

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/bring-versus-take?page=all

 

 

 

What Is the Difference Between "Bring" and "Take"?

Whether you use “bring” or “take” generally depends on your point of reference for the action. You ask people to bring things to the place you are, and you take things to the place you are going. As one listener named Simone put it, you bring things here and take things there.

You ask people to bring things to you, and you take things to other people. You ask people to bring you coffee, and you offer to take the dishes to the kitchen. You tell people to bring you good news, and you take your camera to the beach.

You ask people to bring things to you, and you take things to other people.

For example, I would ask Aardvark to bring Squiggly to my party next week, and then Aardvark would call Squiggly and ask, “May I take you to Grammar Girl's party?” I am asking Aardvark to bring Squiggly because I am at the destination—from my perspective, Aardvark is bringing someone here. Aardvark is offering to take Squiggly because he is transporting someone to a remote destination—from Aardvark's perspective, he is taking someone there.

Here are two more examples that help me remember.

First, think of a restaurant where you can get food to go. It's often informally called getting “take out.” When you get take-out food, you're moving the food from your location—the restaurant—to somewhere else—a destination. And it's take-out food, not bring-out food. You're taking the food to a destination: out.

Second, if I'm sitting at home feeling lazy and wishing dinner would appear, I would say, “I wish someone would bring me dinner.” I imagine Pat stopping at a restaurant and getting dinner to go. From my perspective, he is bringing me dinner because dinner is coming to my location.

Next: What About "Take a Bath" or "Bring Him Down a Peg"?

Exceptions: "Bring" and "Take" in Idioms

I suspect one reason some people are confused about "bring" and "take" is that there are many exceptions to the basic rules. For example, idioms such as "bring someone down a peg" and "take a bath" and phrasal verbs such as "bring up," "bring about," "take down," and "take after" don't comply with the rule that "bring" means to cause something to come to the speaker and "take" means to cause something to go away from the speaker.

Exceptions: “Bring” and “Take” for Future Events

Further, the simple rules fall apart when you consider an event in the future where nobody has arrived yet. Do you bring rum cake to the school bazaar or do you take rum cake to the school bazaar? It simply depends on where you want to place the emphasis of the sentence—which perspective you want to adopt.

If you want to focus on the school and write from the perspective of the bazaar, you bring the cake to the bazaar.

If you want to focus on your kitchen and write from the perspective of home, then you take the cake to the bazaar (which puts the focus on taking it away from your home).

When you start writing about the future and have to choose between “bring” and “take,” imagine where you are in the scenario, and make your word choice based on that location.

The Past Tense of “Bring”

As an aside, the past tense of “bring” is “brought,” as in, “He brought me flowers.” In some regions people say “brung” or “brang,” but it isn't standard English.

What About "Come" and "Go"?

An interesting note is that the words “come” and “go” follow rules that are similar to those for “bring” and “take.”

“Come” is like “bring”: you ask people to come here—to come to where you are. “Go” is like “take”: you tell people to go away—to move away from your location. Aardvark and Squiggly will come to my party, and when Aardvark calls Squiggly, he'll say, “Let's go to Grammar Girl's party.”

- See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/bring-versus-take?page=all#sthash.oyN8DhJo.dpuf

post #551 of 1115
Gawd you guys hurt my brian sonetimes.
post #552 of 1115

I never post about anyone else in here because I am terrible with grammar and spelling, but do my best.   Here is one I see mixed all the time though: 

 

Farther usually refers to physical distance. Further refers to an extension of time or degree.

 

It also makes me think of the movie Finding Forrester.   

post #553 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post
 

This one is for you Slice:  ;-)

 

Farther usually refers to physical distance. Further refers to an extension of time or degree.

 

Know, your wrong.

post #554 of 1115

Farther and further both mean at a greater distance, and they are used interchangeably in this sense. In the United States, though, farther is more often used to refer to physical distances, and further more often refers to figurative and nonphysical distances. For example, we might say that one mountain is farther away than another, while we might say the price of a stock (a nonphysical thing) fell further today than yesterday. This is not a rule, however, and further is often used for physical distances

post #555 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post
 

Farther and further both mean at a greater distance, and they are used interchangeably in this sense. In the United States, though, farther is more often used to refer to physical distances, and further more often refers to figurative and nonphysical distances. For example, we might say that one mountain is farther away than another, while we might say the price of a stock (a nonphysical thing) fell further today than yesterday. This is not a rule, however, and further is often used for physical distances

Yes you are right I forgot that it is not technically incorrect but preferable.  I use further for the degree to which something is.

 

edit:  I must have accidentally posted the first note as well because I did not actually want to single anyone out over it.   

post #556 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post
 

Yes you are right I forgot that it is not technically incorrect but preferable.  I use further for the degree to which something is.

 

edit:  I must have accidentally posted the first note as well because I did not actually want to single anyone out over it.   

 

Don't worry, I'm not offended at being singled out. I chuckled. :-P

post #557 of 1115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slice of Life View Post
 

 

Don't worry, I'm not offended at being singled out. I chuckled. :-P

My business professor was always on my case about noun, pronoun conflicts, so these kind of things always freaked me out.  I know I am an indiot as well.   

post #558 of 1115

You guys are both wrong.  Fartherrmore, you can't spell.

 

:-P

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