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Good irons for weekend golfer - Page 3

post #37 of 55
135mph bs does not = 105mph ss

I wouldn't trust those clowns as far as I could throw 'em.....and the clubs too.

Some folks just don't understand buying, selling and values of used clubs. The PGA VG is a crock of chit. Who are they to tell me that the driver I paid $300 for new is worth $150 trade 2 days later. Gimme a break. That set you showed is worth more than $300, period.
post #38 of 55
I understand value very well. You're right though, who is Ford to tell you that the car you just drove off their lot is depreciated by 20%. That doesn't matter though, right?
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

I understand value very well. You're right though, who is Ford to tell you that the car you just drove off their lot is depreciated by 20%. That doesn't matter though, right?

It does matter. That's why I don't drive a Ford. b2_tongue.gif
post #40 of 55

Id suggest getting a cheap set of Wilsons or Walter Hagens.  You could get them for $300 or less and would have everything youd need: driver, 3-wood, 5-wood, irons, putter and bag.  Honestly, someone who is starting out and honestly most of your seasoned weekend golfers dont need a high-end set of clubs from the more well-known golf companies.

post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitleistWI View Post

Id suggest getting a cheap set of Wilsons or Walter Hagens.  You could get them for $300 or less and would have everything youd need: driver, 3-wood, 5-wood, irons, putter and bag.  Honestly, someone who is starting out and honestly most of your seasoned weekend golfers dont need a high-end set of clubs from the more well-known golf companies.

 

THis is exactly what I said ... for $200, he could get a perfectly fine set to learn on for a couple years & when he has a repeatable swing, then get fitted and take advantage of better gear.   Looking back, that is what I should have done, because, I've gotten into it so seriously, I'm looking to upgrade my gear, and wish I didn't drop alot of money into it so early ...

post #42 of 55
Thread Starter 
Bad news.....the Ping irons were Orange dots. I'm 6'. I'll either go with a good used set or some cheaper clubs like Wilsons until I get better.
post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by jncasey View Post

Bad news.....the Ping irons were Orange dots. I'm 6'. I'll either go with a good used set or some cheaper clubs like Wilsons until I get better.


If you want to try some different Pings you can meet me at the driving range at Knights Play in Apex this weekend. I can bring Eye 2's 1 degree flat stiff flex shaft, Eye 2+'s standard lie regular flex (copies), G10's 1.5 degrees upright soft regular shaft, G15's standard lie regular flex , G20's standard lie and regular flex.

None of the above is available for sale, just to try out a few swings. The proshop there has several demo clubs as well.

I do have some clubs for sale if you are interested.

post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthehole View Post

you'll never get a better deal on a set of very high quality irons than this - truly an exceptional deal:  http://www.golfsmith.com/product/30081642/wilson-staff-ci9-4-gw-iron-set-with-steel-shafts

 

These are better than the irons I play & paid alot more for.    Plus Wilson Staff have the best golf commercials EVER !!!!!    

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyIbhwPBL4c

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8xI-QAba_E&feature=related


Damn that seems like a really great price, wonder why they are so cheap.

TGW has the same price with $7 shipping and zero tax. Plus the added benefit of not having to deal with Golfsmith!

post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by jncasey View Post

Bad news.....the Ping irons were Orange dots. I'm 6'. I'll either go with a good used set or some cheaper clubs like Wilsons until I get better.

Those Ci9's are some of the best clubs I ever owned. Still wish I'dve kept 'em.
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhp1404 View Post

Taylormade Burner 2.0, Callaway Razr, Ping G15, Cobra S3. These are all good and pretty cheap. They are all easy to hit and great beginner irons. For drivers, you want to get something relatively new because technology has changed so much. Taylormade Burner and Callaway Octane or Diablo are good and cheap as well. The driver is more important than irons, so i would spend a little more time getting fitted for the right driver but still take time on the irons. Try Rockbottomgolf.com, they have a great selection of cheap clubs.


The driver is not the most impt club in ones bag. At most you use it once per hole and in fact generally only 14 times per round. The putter is used (if one is lucky enough to two put every green as a newbie) 36 times per round (or MORE!lol).

For a newbie I'd say get a good 15 degree fairway wood, doesn't matter which one it is, but the loft at the beginning, is very impt to a newbie. Learn to hit it and you will be happy, I guarantee this.

Next, stay away from any iron in your bag that has less loft than a 6 iron. From 6 through the PW you can master these if you just trust the club and let it do the work. You only swing the club, so let it be the work horse. (YES you do have to swing it correctly.)

Lastly I can honestly tell you that with a fairway wood (or two. I'd suggest a 5 and 7) you can tee off, take your fairway shots and then rely on your 6 and shorter irons to reach any green without having to rely on hitting it long. Look, most people on this forum (I said most, not everyone) can't go out to a rated course, play by the PGA rules and hit their claimed handicaps. It just doesn't happen, believe me, it doesn't. (but you that are about to chime in, remember I said 'most', not all).

Learn to hit your 5 wood 200 yards (more if you are able) but learn to hit it 'dead center of the fairway'. This in it's self will save you a dozen strokes in a round of golf as a newbie. Hit it off the Tee and from the fairway when needed, same with your 7 wood. If you hit a 200 to 220 yard tee shot (dead center of the fairway) and a 7 wood another 180 to 190 (dead center of the fairway) you will be as far as 410 yards down the hole and as I said 'dead center of the fairway, after two strokes. Heck you may be on some shorter greens already. Nevertheless you now can pitch and putt out. On a par five, with these same distances, you can be 600 yards down the fairway in 3 simple shots with your 5 and 7 wood. There will not be any 600 yard par fives in your life 99.99999% of the time. So, you should be on the green in three shots on a par 5 with your 5 and 7 wood and be looking at a two putt out for a par. Sound good? Does to me!

Walk away from any ego. Learn to hit the ball with the club that works for you. You have an entire life to pick up a driver later on down the road and try it out. If it works for you, after you have your swing down 'pat' then you may want to risk and bad banana ball or hard pulled hook to try to get distance. It'll happen, I will put money on it, you will in time slice or hook or top the holy crap out of the ball in time while using a driver. Everyone has, Everyone will. None of us are pros making our living at playing golf on these forums (or at least 99.99999% don't).

Golf's a game, you are supposed to enjoy it.

Go get a 5 an 7 wood and learn to hit them 'right down the middle of the fairway 190 to 220 yards'. In time you will soon find out your 5 wood is giving you 230 to 240 total yards and if you are smart, you'll keep it dead center of the fairway. Your 7 wood will now be hitting like your 5 wood did when you started. All of a sudden you can reach any par 4 with these two clubs or one of these clubs and an iron.

Keep it simple, golf is a simple game. WE golfers make it difficult.

My best, Merry Christmas and be safe.

post #47 of 55

The number of shots per round is a poor measure of the importance of a club. The number of strokes to be gained or lost is more important. For example look at you number of putts. How many really matter? To me it is the ones between 4-15 ft (I have shot of making those) and 35+ ft (a decent of leaving it 4+ ft from the hole). Yes I do miss the <4fts and occasionally make or miss a 15-35 footer real bad but it isn't a lot. Compare that to the driver. If on a 400 yard par 4 I pull the driver and execute, I have a 7 iron to the hole. If I pull the 5 wood, I am looking at hitting the 5wood again. I rarely ever get a 5 wood to stick on the green. Obviously if I was a bomber with a 240 yard 5 wood that was always straight (mine is more accurate than the driver but I can still hook or slice on a somewhat regular basis), the math changes as I can hit a 5wood and still have a 6/7 or so iron approach shot.  It sounds great to say that you can just go hit 5wood/7wood and hit the GIR  but that is a heck of a lot easier to say than do.  Now I am still in favor of teeing off with a 5 wood a lot of the time. I just accept that on some of those holes, I will be happy with a bogey and thrilled with a par when my short game shot is executed well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DocParty View Post


The driver is not the most impt club in ones bag. At most you use it once per hole and in fact generally only 14 times per round. The putter is used (if one is lucky enough to two put every green as a newbie) 36 times per round (or MORE!lol).

For a newbie I'd say get a good 15 degree fairway wood, doesn't matter which one it is, but the loft at the beginning, is very impt to a newbie. Learn to hit it and you will be happy, I guarantee this.

Next, stay away from any iron in your bag that has less loft than a 6 iron. From 6 through the PW you can master these if you just trust the club and let it do the work. You only swing the club, so let it be the work horse. (YES you do have to swing it correctly.)

Lastly I can honestly tell you that with a fairway wood (or two. I'd suggest a 5 and 7) you can tee off, take your fairway shots and then rely on your 6 and shorter irons to reach any green without having to rely on hitting it long. Look, most people on this forum (I said most, not everyone) can't go out to a rated course, play by the PGA rules and hit their claimed handicaps. It just doesn't happen, believe me, it doesn't. (but you that are about to chime in, remember I said 'most', not all).

Learn to hit your 5 wood 200 yards (more if you are able) but learn to hit it 'dead center of the fairway'. This in it's self will save you a dozen strokes in a round of golf as a newbie. Hit it off the Tee and from the fairway when needed, same with your 7 wood. If you hit a 200 to 220 yard tee shot (dead center of the fairway) and a 7 wood another 180 to 190 (dead center of the fairway) you will be as far as 410 yards down the hole and as I said 'dead center of the fairway, after two strokes. Heck you may be on some shorter greens already. Nevertheless you now can pitch and putt out. On a par five, with these same distances, you can be 600 yards down the fairway in 3 simple shots with your 5 and 7 wood. There will not be any 600 yard par fives in your life 99.99999% of the time. So, you should be on the green in three shots on a par 5 with your 5 and 7 wood and be looking at a two putt out for a par. Sound good? Does to me!

Walk away from any ego. Learn to hit the ball with the club that works for you. You have an entire life to pick up a driver later on down the road and try it out. If it works for you, after you have your swing down 'pat' then you may want to risk and bad banana ball or hard pulled hook to try to get distance. It'll happen, I will put money on it, you will in time slice or hook or top the holy crap out of the ball in time while using a driver. Everyone has, Everyone will. None of us are pros making our living at playing golf on these forums (or at least 99.99999% don't).

Golf's a game, you are supposed to enjoy it.

Go get a 5 an 7 wood and learn to hit them 'right down the middle of the fairway 190 to 220 yards'. In time you will soon find out your 5 wood is giving you 230 to 240 total yards and if you are smart, you'll keep it dead center of the fairway. Your 7 wood will now be hitting like your 5 wood did when you started. All of a sudden you can reach any par 4 with these two clubs or one of these clubs and an iron.

Keep it simple, golf is a simple game. WE golfers make it difficult.

My best, Merry Christmas and be safe.

post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by x129 View Post

The number of shots per round is a poor measure of the importance of a club. The number of strokes to be gained or lost is more important. For example look at you number of putts. How many really matter? To me it is the ones between 4-15 ft (I have shot of making those) and 35+ ft (a decent of leaving it 4+ ft from the hole). Yes I do miss the <4fts and occasionally make or miss a 15-35 footer real bad but it isn't a lot. Compare that to the driver. If on a 400 yard par 4 I pull the driver and execute, I have a 7 iron to the hole. If I pull the 5 wood, I am looking at hitting the 5wood again. I rarely ever get a 5 wood to stick on the green. Obviously if I was a bomber with a 240 yard 5 wood that was always straight (mine is more accurate than the driver but I can still hook or slice on a somewhat regular basis), the math changes as I can hit a 5wood and still have a 6/7 or so iron approach shot.  It sounds great to say that you can just go hit 5wood/7wood and hit the GIR  but that is a heck of a lot easier to say than do.  Now I am still in favor of teeing off with a 5 wood a lot of the time. I just accept that on some of those holes, I will be happy with a bogey and thrilled with a par when my short game shot is executed well.


Well to each his own game, that's golf. But for the most part, golfers on this blog, if they were to play by PGA rules on a sanctioned course, they'd miss their handicaps all of the time.

A five wood, for me, travels high and drops soft. I don't use a 7 wood I have a hybrid for that shot. When I hit the green, it stops. Every shot with my 3 wood gets great roll and bounce. I'm not a long hitter as I indicated above due to age and physical condition, so it works for me. I've never seen but 20% of par fours that were out of reach with two good strikes of the ball. That's the kicker, it's all up to the golfer, not the club. The 25% or so that are out of my range, give me a great opportunity to chip on, hope to get close enough for a one putt, but always gives me a 2 putt opportunity. It all comes down to me and my swing at that time. Whether I use a short iron, mid iron, or a hybrid/wood, I trust my clubs to do what I am able to do, based on my swing being correct. I'm the problem when things go wrong, not the club choice or the club it's self.

I'm only a bogie golfer at this point in my renewed interest in the game and every problem on the course I have, is my fault, none of them are my clubs fault.

If more golfers dropped the ego and used what worked for them during their game they'd be much more productive. As time goes on, every golfer gains knowledge and more distance in his/her clubs. Some guys/gals can pick up a driver and knock it 300 yards straight down the fairway, like my son who has just begun golf 7 months ago. However, when there is mishit it costs him a stroke to get back in the game. He'd been better off using a shorter distance, higher loft wood and keep it in the middle of the fairway in my opinion, but it's his game so he's running his show.

I love the game, left it for 18.5 years and have just started up again 7 months ago when my son showed an interest in it. I wish I had never stopped playing, but that's my fault.

Wishing you all a great, safe, happy new year and all the great golf you can stand.

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocParty View Post


Well to each his own game, that's golf. But for the most part, golfers on this blog, if they were to play by PGA rules on a sanctioned course, they'd miss their handicaps all of the time.

A five wood, for me, travels high and drops soft. I don't use a 7 wood I have a hybrid for that shot. When I hit the green, it stops. Every shot with my 3 wood gets great roll and bounce. I'm not a long hitter as I indicated above due to age and physical condition, so it works for me. I've never seen but 20% of par fours that were out of reach with two good strikes of the ball. That's the kicker, it's all up to the golfer, not the club. The 25% or so that are out of my range, give me a great opportunity to chip on, hope to get close enough for a one putt, but always gives me a 2 putt opportunity. It all comes down to me and my swing at that time. Whether I use a short iron, mid iron, or a hybrid/wood, I trust my clubs to do what I am able to do, based on my swing being correct. I'm the problem when things go wrong, not the club choice or the club it's self.

I'm only a bogie golfer at this point in my renewed interest in the game and every problem on the course I have, is my fault, none of them are my clubs fault.

If more golfers dropped the ego and used what worked for them during their game they'd be much more productive. As time goes on, every golfer gains knowledge and more distance in his/her clubs. Some guys/gals can pick up a driver and knock it 300 yards straight down the fairway, like my son who has just begun golf 7 months ago. However, when there is mishit it costs him a stroke to get back in the game. He'd been better off using a shorter distance, higher loft wood and keep it in the middle of the fairway in my opinion, but it's his game so he's running his show.

I love the game, left it for 18.5 years and have just started up again 7 months ago when my son showed an interest in it. I wish I had never stopped playing, but that's my fault.

Wishing you all a great, safe, happy new year and all the great golf you can stand.


I forgot to add, most pro golfers will agree, the game starts at the 150 yard marker, the approach to the green. You only get one chance to do this in regulation. And putting really is the most used stroke in the bag. Getting on the green in regulation or one over and having to 3 putt is a disaster, if everyone putts everything out.

post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by jncasey View Post

Thanks for the quick advice everyone. I plan on going to a golf shop tomorrow to try out a few irons and drivers. I've been told that the Cobra AMP driver is a must.....
My brother-in-law called me this afternoon with a good offer. His friend is willing to sell for $500:

Ping G10 irons full set w/wedges
Ping G10 driver
Taylormade 2.0 3 wood + hybrid club
Odyssey putter
Ping golf bag

He said he might take less than $500. I need to find out if the irons would fit me. Does this sound like a good deal? Is there a significant difference between the G10's and 15's or even 20's? I could really use a set of game-improvement irons. While I would like to invest in a life-long set, it seems as if I might benefit better by purchasing a slightly used set and save $$$. With experience, I can advance to more challenging clubs (not sure how you would phrase that correctly).

 

I played 18 holes again today with the classic Walter Hagen irons and a Snake Eyes 320cc driver (made by my grandfather). I hit the irons excellent. If you miss; however, it will send a vibration that rattles from your feet to your face. My longest drive with the Snake Eyes was 265 yards. With all the new technological improvements in irons and especially drivers, I can't wait to take advantage of them. Anything at this point would be better than my 1970 irons.

Thanks,

 

Jonatha

I would buy them in a heartbeat. I play the G15s and yes the G10s are the same technology just a few years apart.

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixel5 View Post

An older set of Ping G-series irons would be great if you are on a tight budget. 
Agreed. I'm still gaming my old faithful Ping G2s after trying both the G10s and G15s. Newer isn't always better, just gotta find what works best for you. Just make sure your looking at Game Improvement irons.
post #52 of 55

If you have a fairly stable swing - not perfect, just somewhat consistent - you could benefit from a fitting with a launch monitor.

 

If your swing is unstable - on Tuesday you slice the ball, on Thursday you hook it, on Saturday you do both - you might combine a lesson package with a fitting. The pro can help you get your swing stabilized, and then fit you for clubs.

 

If you buy a new set of clubs, you should be able to negotiate for a free fitting. Some shops don't charge if you buy a new club(s). By new, they usually mean one that no one else has owned before. So, if you got a model no longer in production, it should be a couple of hundred $$ off the original price.

 

Also, a skilled fitter may be able to find you a decent set of used clubs that fit your "recipe." The fitter can also tweak the set a little if it's close, but not quite perfect.

 

What I have done on occasion is get some launch monitor data on a set of clubs, and then go back a week later and do it again to see if the results are fairly close. That's one way to determine how stable your swing is. If the shop's not crowded that day, they shouldn't mind because they want at least someone hitting shots, so any walk-in customers will be tempted to join in.

post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooke119 View Post

I would buy them in a heartbeat. I play the G15s and yes the G10s are the same technology just a few years apart.


do what works for you. the only clubs that are a MUST in a golfers bag are the ones you can hit with confidence and gain as much distance without losing accuracy.

post #54 of 55

I think the only time you should actually get fitted is if you need longer than standard shafts, otherwise, you're going to really jack up your swing, your stance, and your back. I'm 6'5" and was recently professionally fitted. The 39.5" shaft he recommended for my 5 iron is a full 3/4" longer than it currently is, and I had my irons lengthened an inch when I bought them. If you're average height and weight, I would recommend getting something inexpensive and using that until you figure out how serious a golfer you want to be. In my humble opinion, it's a waste to go out and spend a fortune on getting fitted, and getting a top of the line set of clubs if you're only going to end up playing once a month. Also, as some one just starting off playing, your clubs are going to take much more of a beating than some one who plays more frequently. 

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