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Private courses are for......... - Page 8

Poll Results: private golf courses are for .......

 
  • 8% (10)
    those who are good players and dont want hackers getting drunk on and tearing up their course
  • 19% (24)
    higher class people who only want to be around other higher class people while playing golf
  • 1% (2)
    those who might be racist towards people of a different color
  • 23% (29)
    people who have the extra money to spend so they are pampered as soon as they set foot on the course
  • 46% (57)
    people who take the game of golf more serious and dont mind paying for the more serious atmosphere
122 Total Votes  
post #127 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmac20 View Post

In two days I will officially be a member of one of the top 100 courses in Canada! c3_clap.gif

 

<teasing>Out of, what, 110? 115?</teasing>

 

(Canada has a lot of great courses, though I read once something like 95% of them are located within 50 miles of the U.S. Border, or something like that, because north of that and it's just too cold too often.)

post #128 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

<teasing>Out of, what, 110? 115?</teasing>

 

(Canada has a lot of great courses, though I read once something like 95% of them are located within 50 miles of the U.S. Border, or something like that, because north of that and it's just too cold too often.)

I'm not surprised. This one is ~20 miles from the border. :-P

 

There are some great courses out east. Cabot Links is supposed to be amazing. Here's a pic. 

 

 

Also, Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore are designing this gem in the same area. 

post #129 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

<teasing>Out of, what, 110? 115?</teasing>

 

(Canada has a lot of great courses, though I read once something like 95% of them are located within 50 miles of the U.S. Border, or something like that, because north of that and it's just too cold too often.)


That's actually to be expected, since a vast majority of the population is within 100 miles of the US border.

post #130 of 145

  When a club suspends initiation fees, I think I understand the potential long-term benefits of increased membership, but how do the current, initiation fee-paying, members feel about this? I'm not sure how I would feel if I had paid my fee and I'm now golfing with someone who has less outlay in their membership and might not take care of the club as someone who paid more to be a member.

 

  I imagine this goes up for a vote, but still wonder...

 

PK

post #131 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaKay View Post
 

  When a club suspends initiation fees, I think I understand the potential long-term benefits of increased membership, but how do the current, initiation fee-paying, members feel about this? I'm not sure how I would feel if I had paid my fee and I'm now golfing with someone who has less outlay in their membership and might not take care of the club as someone who paid more to be a member.

 

  I imagine this goes up for a vote, but still wonder...

 

PK

I would guess there's some resentment, but the alternative is the club fails financially and they lose their initiation fees.  I joined a club last year that had suspended initiation fees ($13,000) and reinstated them this year.  I have heard some grumblings but overall it's not a major issue because if you quit the club you get your initiation fee money back.

post #132 of 145

I feel that both of the last two answers apply.  Some people do it for the pampering and to rub elbows with "society", and others do it for the golf.  Often the difference can just be in the name, whether it's a "country club" or a "golf club".  Most "golf" clubs attract serious players, while most "country" clubs draw a mix of types.

post #133 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post
 

I would guess there's some resentment, but the alternative is the club fails financially and they lose their initiation fees.  I joined a club last year that had suspended initiation fees ($13,000) and reinstated them this year.  I have heard some grumblings but overall it's not a major issue because if you quit the club you get your initiation fee money back.


If I may ask, do you have full voting privileges or do you have some reduced benefit(s)? And, I assume a club that is closer to failing financially wouldn't be passing out too many returned initiation fees without some structured exit strategy. Maybe a new member needs to signup/pay before returning money? TIA.

post #134 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaKay View Post
 


If I may ask, do you have full voting privileges or do you have some reduced benefit(s)? And, I assume a club that is closer to failing financially wouldn't be passing out too many returned initiation fees without some structured exit strategy. Maybe a new member needs to signup/pay before returning money? TIA.

I get full voting privileges, the only difference is I didn't pay an initiation fee so I don't get any money back if I leave the club.  The club wasn't failing financially, they were looking to add new members to offset future attrition.  Everyone that has resigned from the club has been paid back their money.

 

Good clubs look at their membership and demographics regularly to identify potential risks.  The clubs cash position is strong so by offering $0 initiation fees they can attract new members at a faster pace than they normally would, also the annual dues and fees more than compensate for the lack of the up front buy in.

post #135 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaKay View Post
 

  When a club suspends initiation fees, I think I understand the potential long-term benefits of increased membership, but how do the current, initiation fee-paying, members feel about this? I'm not sure how I would feel if I had paid my fee and I'm now golfing with someone who has less outlay in their membership and might not take care of the club as someone who paid more to be a member.

 

  I imagine this goes up for a vote, but still wonder...

 

PK

 

We have had different initiation fees over the years, mostly dependent on the current size of our membership and the current state of the economy. I don't mind the changes to initiation fees because in bad times we hemorrhage members and in good times we grow. Our initiation fee has traditionally been around $20,000, but in the last 12 years or so it was reduced to as low as $5,000 and is currently at $10,000. Right now we are growing and the raised initiation hasn't stopped applications and the membership is, to me, at an unacceptable level. We have gone over the number of members allowed in our by-laws by about 40. Since there are some very good clubs in the area that have suspended initiation fees, the board is afraid that potential members will go elsewhere if we start a waiting list. I say, who cares? We have enough members now and weekend mornings are getting out of control and some new members are showing real ignorance of course etiquette and course maintenance. I understand we need the dues base in order to keep from having assessments and such, but there is a point of diminishing returns and adverse circumstances.

post #136 of 145

Thank you both for taking the time to post your insight. That helps somewhat. I appreciate it.

post #137 of 145
Our club had no choice but to suspend them. It was either that or death.
post #138 of 145

no offense but theres no way in sam he..ll id pay that to play in Canada especially since the golfing season cant be too long considering the cold winter unless im mistaken.thats very pricey in the southeast where you can play year round pretty much.

post #139 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post
 

My parent's club is losing senior members. Last two times I was there they stopped along the course to chat with neighbors and both had quit the club. The politics of a private club can be nuts. At this club they are offering new members a full membership for $1000. The stipulation is if you stay for a year they waive the remainder of the $6000 due. However they just voted to raise the dues of the senior members because they use the course more. So now the senior members have a pending suit against the club. Meanwhile the new members that paid just 1K to join just voted to approve a 5 year 5K per year assessment to remodel the bar and grill. Which is nuts because the food at this place is hit and miss and usually marginal at best. The service is worse because the place is so dead they can't keep pros there so you get so it's staffed with fast food level workers. They haven't had a real chef there in at least 5 years. So you are on the hook to spend $400 a quarter there and the food sucks.

I believe I belong to the course you're referring to. The Ranch in Westminster. We did not vote to approve the assessment for the bar and grille (this round, I'm sure a modified plan will be submitted shortly). But you're off on your numbers. It was not 5 years at 5K per. That's $25,000 per member!. We could build a whole new CC for that. It was going to be a 1 time $4k assessment. 

 

The reason the Senior membership was raised was due to what you stated, a few seniors had round counts way outside of what was envisioned when the club offered those seniors that membership level. 2 members did sue, but that was recently settled without going to court. Overall, it wouldn't be the worse thing in the world to get the club trending younger in age. The club needs to look to having a healthy, growing membership for the next 20-30 years, not stagnate with the (fine) members they've had for the last 20-30. (and the older members were definitely part of the politics that you talk about.)

 

No comment on the food as taste is subjective. The staff/chef in the bar and grille have been the same since I joined a few years ago. (oh, and it's not $400 a quarter. It's $400 every 6 months)

post #140 of 145

Oh so these initiation fees you get back if you leave?  I assumed that money was just gone once you joined.  $10,000+ seems like an outrageous amount of money to me though, hell even $5000 would probably make me balk.  Ha  I did buy a season pass in this town I recently moved to though; $340 for unlimited play at either city course so I'm looking forward to playing a ridiculous number of rounds this year.  :-D

 

This is interesting reading the feedback from private courses though since I know so little about them.  The pampering part I couldn't care less about because I have such little appreciation for that sort of thing but I really, really like playing immaculate courses.

post #141 of 145

  I had to check with a semi-private course close by here and at one time they suspended their initiation fee. These new members who didn't have to pay the initiation fee, had full golf playing privileges but no voting rights. They could pay the initiation fee at a later date to get voting rights.

 

  This makes sense to me: The club gets new, paying members who want to play golf but these members cannot influence the club's future as much. If the member finds the club enjoyable enough, there is incentive to pay those initiation fees.

 

  Maybe this doesn't work out normally, though...?

post #142 of 145

I am looking to join a private club (wife also) because we are sick of playing 5 hour rounds of golf. Many in our area have suspended the initiation fees and minimums so it has become something we can afford. We actually would like to meet some more people and make some new golf buddies and be in some the social events. I don't think we are snobs but I'm willing to spend the $ to be on a good course where people have some golf etiquette. 

post #143 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucki1968 View Post
 

I am looking to join a private club (wife also) because we are sick of playing 5 hour rounds of golf. Many in our area have suspended the initiation fees and minimums so it has become something we can afford. We actually would like to meet some more people and make some new golf buddies and be in some the social events. I don't think we are snobs but I'm willing to spend the $ to be on a good course where people have some golf etiquette.

 

You are typical member...you will run into a few snobs but they are not the rule. for the most part it will be the same type of people you already play with - just with a better golf course, better structure and quicker rounds that can be set up and changed easy - of course it costs more money as well! At my club if you take 4 hours to play a round you will probably have a group or 2 waiting.

post #144 of 145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucki1968 View Post
 

I am looking to join a private club (wife also) because we are sick of playing 5 hour rounds of golf. Many in our area have suspended the initiation fees and minimums so it has become something we can afford. We actually would like to meet some more people and make some new golf buddies and be in some the social events. I don't think we are snobs but I'm willing to spend the $ to be on a good course where people have some golf etiquette. 

 

I posted this in another thread, but it's on topic here too.....

 

You'll need to pick your club carefully....

If you think that a private club insulates you from slow play and boorish behavior, you may be very disappointed. You'll find 5-somes, members playing with their kids, guys who jump out on the spur of the moment to play 3 quick holes to settle a bet, and the same range of skill levels that you find at most public course....the difference being that they're all members, and as such, many feel entitled to use the course however the see fit. The more tenured members especially....and make no mistake, the club pro, GM, or rangers, are seldom going to be sympathetic to the "new guy" who complains that he can't get around in 2:15 on Saturday morning, that the twice-weekly ladies group won't let him through, or that Dr Smith and the club treasurer are playing as a 5-some.....and not a particularly quick one at that.

I've been a member at several clubs and am a fan of private clubs. But they are what they are, and what they're usually not, is an empty course that you can run around as fast as you like.  You might look for a golf club, rather than a country club.  The latter will have a lot more amenities  (dining room, pool, tennis, fitness facilities, etc....) in addition to the golf, but those amenities will attract more members to whom golf is secondary, but still play enough to cause a lot of the problems you're trying to avoid.  The downside to the former is that it tends to be a much harder sell to your wife, who may be more interested in the other amenities than you.....

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