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Flop Wedge Distance

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

So I've decided to start using my flop wedge (64*) instead of taking half-swing shots with my sand wedge for short shots. Realistically, how much distance could I get with it? I know it's hard to say without seeing my swing, but I can hit my SW (56*) about 80 yards max.

post #2 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Peter View Post

So I've decided to start using my flop wedge (64*) instead of taking half-swing shots with my sand wedge for short shots. Realistically, how much distance could I get with it? I know it's hard to say without seeing my swing, but I can hit my SW (56*) about 80 yards max.

Surely that is something you can only work out for yourself. Go and hit a few balls.

post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorty View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Peter View Post

So I've decided to start using my flop wedge (64*) instead of taking half-swing shots with my sand wedge for short shots. Realistically, how much distance could I get with it? I know it's hard to say without seeing my swing, but I can hit my SW (56*) about 80 yards max.

Surely that is something you can only work out for yourself. Go and hit a few balls.

I carried a 64 for a very short while - a complete lack of consistent distance control  compared to a 60.

post #4 of 24

How can anyone tell you how far you going to hit a club without actually seeing you play (not swing) in person? I will say that if you're only hitting your SW 80 yards, maybe a 60* LW would be better for you than a 64*.

post #5 of 24

Usually with wedges the shaft length doesn't change as much, but if the shaft is shorter and 8 degrees of change, i would say 1.5-2 club gaps, so about 17-22 yards shorter.. So i would guess 60 yards... 

 

I would find a course that gets little play and go on an off time, so you can throw down some golf balls at different yardages. 

post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses everyone. The reason why I asked is that I can't get to practice/try out clubs that often other than during a round. I'm obviously not expecting you to tell me my exact yardage, just a ball park number or something to aim for. 60 yards seems like a reasonable number to aim for though and definitely possible.

post #7 of 24

You need to read a book.I t is called "how to learn golf"  http://www.amazon.com/How-Learn-Golf-Harry-Hurt/dp/0743417267

 

The reason I say this is there are several swing philosophies that can be used to answer your question.  You need to determine which philosophy is "you" and then proceed with it as it applies to your 64 wedge.

 

Chapter 4

Unified or Multiple swing approach to the short game. Which obviously the 64 wedge is used for.

 

Unified can be small muscle, big muscle, mixed muscle or LAWs of golf technique.

 

 That being said I would say if you give it a full swing on a great lie then 30-40 yards would be a reasonable result

post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Robert View Post

You need to read a book.I t is called "how to learn golf"  http://www.amazon.com/How-Learn-Golf-Harry-Hurt/dp/0743417267

 

The reason I say this is there are several swing philosophies that can be used to answer your question.  You need to determine which philosophy is "you" and then proceed with it as it applies to your 64 wedge.

 

Chapter 4

Unified or Multiple swing approach to the short game. Which obviously the 64 wedge is used for.

 

Unified can be small muscle, big muscle, mixed muscle or LAWs of golf technique.

 

 That being said I would say if you give it a full swing on a great lie then 30-40 yards would be a reasonable result

 

Thanks Jon, I'll have to check out that book now!

post #9 of 24

If you're looking for consistency, then adding a 64* wedge is not likely to produce the desired result.  With perfect contact, you're hitting the ball at a very oblique angle, so that very little of the clubhead energy is transferred to the ball.  On a full swing, the difference between perfect contact and three grooves high could mean a difference of 25-50% of the energy transfer to the ball.  And two grooves low would be a bladed shot with a loft that high, resulting in a shot that travels twice as far as normal.

 

I understand your concept:  one swing + multiple lofts = easy manipulation of distance.  I'd say that's basically true for lofts between 25* and 52* (+/- a little depending whether you're a sweeper or digger with your wedges).  But at lofts of 60* and up, your margin of error for contact is razor thin, and you're more likely to chunk or top it than hit your "stock" distance.

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-troop View Post

If you're looking for consistency, then adding a 64* wedge is not likely to produce the desired result.  With perfect contact, you're hitting the ball at a very oblique angle, so that very little of the clubhead energy is transferred to the ball.  On a full swing, the difference between perfect contact and three grooves high could mean a difference of 25-50% of the energy transfer to the ball.  And two grooves low would be a bladed shot with a loft that high, resulting in a shot that travels twice as far as normal.

I understand your concept:  one swing + multiple lofts = easy manipulation of distance.  I'd say that's basically true for lofts between 25* and 52* (+/- a little depending whether you're a sweeper or digger with your wedges).  But at lofts of 60* and up, your margin of error for contact is razor thin, and you're more likely to chunk or top it than hit your "stock" distance.

Uncle Pete.... Pls read k-troop's post several times!

My posted index is accurate and a result of a very good short/wedge game. I don't carry even a 60* wedge ( let alone a 64*) for the exact reasons k-troop mentions.

Golf is all about consistency, and high lofted wedges in the hands of mid/high handicappers are not recipes for consistency.

Learn to hit a little 3/4 sand wedge or even a 1/2 pitching wedge from 50 yds and I promise, you'll score better.
post #11 of 24

I think they say 4* is 12 yards, so you could go with 50-60 yards as a guess and see if you come up short of long of that.

post #12 of 24
What kind of gobbledygook crap are you peddling? You're doing it all over the place do the moderators know you keep peddling this stuff? Are you paying to be a sponsor what are you?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Robert View Post

You need to read a book.I t is called "how to learn golf"  http://www.amazon.com/How-Learn-Golf-Harry-Hurt/dp/0743417267


The reason I say this is there are several swing philosophies that can be used to answer your question.  You need to determine which philosophy is "you" and then proceed with it as it applies to your 64 wedge.

Chapter 4
Unified or Multiple swing approach to the short game. Which obviously the 64 wedge is used for.

Unified can be small muscle, big muscle, mixed muscle or LAWs of golf technique.

 That being said I would say if you give it a full swing on a great lie then 30-40 yards would be a reasonable result
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil McGleno View Post

What kind of gobbledygook crap are you peddling? You're doing it all over the place do the moderators know you keep peddling this stuff? Are you paying to be a sponsor what are you?

It is called helping people. Try it sometime.

post #14 of 24

I must be doing something wrong....  I hit my 52* at about 105 yards max  (comfortable at 95-100 I'd say)  and while I don't have a 64*,  I don't take my 60* out of the bag unless I'm 20 yards or in,  and out of green!

post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-troop View Post

If you're looking for consistency, then adding a 64* wedge is not likely to produce the desired result.  With perfect contact, you're hitting the ball at a very oblique angle, so that very little of the clubhead energy is transferred to the ball.  On a full swing, the difference between perfect contact and three grooves high could mean a difference of 25-50% of the energy transfer to the ball.  And two grooves low would be a bladed shot with a loft that high, resulting in a shot that travels twice as far as normal.

 

I understand your concept:  one swing + multiple lofts = easy manipulation of distance.  I'd say that's basically true for lofts between 25* and 52* (+/- a little depending whether you're a sweeper or digger with your wedges).  But at lofts of 60* and up, your margin of error for contact is razor thin, and you're more likely to chunk or top it than hit your "stock" distance.

 

Yes you're right K-troop, one of the reasons I wanted to use a 64* wedge was to not have to take a half-swing with another club. Your reasoning makes perfect sense though. I could never hit my 64* wedge consistently and I'm starting to think it it's because of what you said. Thanks for posting and explaining that for me!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


Uncle Pete.... Pls read k-troop's post several times!
My posted index is accurate and a result of a very good short/wedge game. I don't carry even a 60* wedge ( let alone a 64*) for the exact reasons k-troop mentions.
Golf is all about consistency, and high lofted wedges in the hands of mid/high handicappers are not recipes for consistency.
Learn to hit a little 3/4 sand wedge or even a 1/2 pitching wedge from 50 yds and I promise, you'll score better.

 

Yeah, I think I'll stick to my SW for now after reading k-troop's very helpful post, at least until I get a bit better and more comfortable with my swing (I just changed it slightly). I feel more comfortable with my SW anyways and consider it one of my best clubs that I can hit with, so hitting 1/2 or 3/4 swings with it shouldn't be too much of a problem.

post #16 of 24

I carry a 64.  It isn't any harder to hit than a 60 or a 56.  I don't buy that.   I'm not hitting it with that much loft.  The club doesn't pass my hands until well after the ball is gone.  I hit it low and controlled up until well, I pick a different club.  Around 70 yards. 

 

To answer your question which is tough to do but will attempt just using how far I hit my wedges.  I hit my 60 right around 85 with a full wedge swing, my 64 around 70.  When I carry a 56 I hit that 95.  But these are stock swings.  I prefer to not to hit really hard wedge shots so my idea distance for a 64 is 63-66 yards.  Same with my 60, I prefer to take just a bit off and hit it just under 80. 

 

The key to consistancy with wedges is foward hands and controlled swings.  For me that wedge has made the 60 yard shot something I am extremely good at considering my skill level.  But it is also something I have been practicing for years.  I expect to get up and in from a good lie from that distance.  Not saying I always do, but I have alot of confidence with that.  But this is by far my strength in golf so I can't speak for anyone else. 

post #17 of 24

Nothing wrong with a 64*, but it is harder to hit than the other wedges.  Maybe not for one guy here or there, but for the vast majority of golfers it comes with a low margin of error.  I think the important thing to keep in mind is that you need to learn how to hit half shots with your wedges (and probably all your irons).  It will never be a skill you wasted your time on, the ability to hit a 2/3 or half shot when necessary is terribly valuable.

post #18 of 24

I hit sw 80 and 60* 60 yards

 

I loved my 60 right away but NEVER got used to a 64 for full swings.

Amazing difference for 4*

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