or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Fixing divots on greens
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fixing divots on greens - Page 3

post #37 of 62

I will fix my mark and any around my "working area" of the green while I'm waiting my turn.  I don't go searching them out or anything..just tidying up my space..

 

You wanna know what bothers me more than ball marks, though?  When a foursome all thinks they should huddle RIGHT around the hole and leave spike marks, scuffs, and bumpy green for everyone behind them!

post #38 of 62

If golf courses really cared  about ppl  fixing the pitch marks on the greens the management could be much more proactive,  Sure on the back of the card we read the notice 'repair your ball marks'. That's it, frequently. Here's what i would do, if i wanted more pitch marks fixed by the players.  Set up a looping, quality produced, video showing best methods of repair; but keep it short, like 2 mins max. Put the video screen out by the practice putting green, under cover. Invite the players to view. On the first tee box i would offer, free, good quality pitchforks like the one used in the video.  Make these easy to carry and i know often  the forks poke my butt when i carry one in my back pocket, the only place i would carry one.  Use encouraging signage esp on par 3 holes, where lots of damage can offer.  At the edge of the 18 green have a collection box for the forks. Thank the players for keeping the greens in good shape.  Weigh the merits of this idea against the costs of greenkeeping and loss of players due to bad greens and you may be surprised. 

post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by joekelly View Post

If golf courses really cared  about ppl  fixing the pitch marks on the greens the management could be much more proactive,  Sure on the back of the card we read the notice 'repair your ball marks'. That's it, frequently. Here's what i would do, if i wanted more pitch marks fixed by the players.  Set up a looping, quality produced, video showing best methods of repair; but keep it short, like 2 mins max. Put the video screen out by the practice putting green, under cover. Invite the players to view. On the first tee box i would offer, free, good quality pitchforks like the one used in the video.  Make these easy to carry and i know often  the forks poke my butt when i carry one in my back pocket, the only place i would carry one.  Use encouraging signage esp on par 3 holes, where lots of damage can offer.  At the edge of the 18 green have a collection box for the forks. Thank the players for keeping the greens in good shape.  Weigh the merits of this idea against the costs of greenkeeping and loss of players due to bad greens and you may be surprised. 

Not practical. I don't have to be reminded to wipe my *** after I sh*t, I just do it nor did I need it to be explained to me over and over. The forks wouldn't last as they'd be going home with patrons. Also, no matter the technique, some pitch marks are going to die, it's just a fact of life. Same with replaced divots.
post #40 of 62

I think courses should include a pitch fork with each greens fee and hand them out with a little card showing how to use it... If someone says no I don't need another pitch fork, they should make them pull it out of their pocket on the spot. If they do not have one ON THEM, then they must take the tool or go play somewhere else.

post #41 of 62
Should golf courses treat all patrons like children because some patrons are oblivious arseholes? Not if they want repeat business.
post #42 of 62

With the length of rounds these days, I don't know how it is possible not to have time to fix pitch/ball marks.

 

I usually fix whatever I see, usually 2-3 a hole - the courses I play, people don't fix their marks. I fixed 3-4 on at least half the holes I played yesterday, including those of the strangers I was paired with, who had no clue.

 

It's cynical to say, but people are in general, disappointing, whether they're not fixing marks or not doing so because it's not their problem. But in general, people don't rake the traps, replace divots, dispose of their broken tees properly. 

post #43 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Gibson View Post

I think courses should include a pitch fork with each greens fee and hand them out with a little card showing how to use it... If someone says no I don't need another pitch fork, they should make them pull it out of their pocket on the spot. If they do not have one ON THEM, then they must take the tool or go play somewhere else.

 

I've played at a course that had a little bucket of souvenir-type ball mark tools by the front desk. There was a sign indicating that they were free, but by taking one you promised to repair your own plus one other ball mark on each green.

 

Seemed like a nice idea. I like yours as well, but I think it's a bit heavy-handed to be practical. It's good to encourage proper repairs, but probably not at the expense of driving away much-needed business.

post #44 of 62

I'm glad I saw this thread. I always thought I was repairing ball marks correctly because I did it with ease instead of ripping it like I see other people do but apparently I have been doing it incorrectly. I now know.

post #45 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sai-Jin View Post

I don't fix other ppl's anymore... I'm not their servant.

This may be the saddest and most disappointing post I've read on this forum. We are the golf nuts here and if one us has this attitude ... it makes me sad.

post #46 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sai-Jin View Post

I don't fix other ppl's anymore... I'm not their servant.

 

Disappointing to hear you say that.

 

I fix as many as I can without delaying play (my group's, mine, or the folks behind me).

post #47 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

Disappointing to hear you say that.

 

I fix as many as I can without delaying play (my group's, mine, or the folks behind me).

I agree with this 100%. I tend to fix as many as I can on my way to my ball on the green and I'll also take a peek at the green's layout while I'm fixing some marks around the opposite side of my ball. Not only am I being constructive and helping to maintain the greens that all golfers are supposed to be responsible for, but I'm also getting my line at the same time.

 

Typically, I found that the same people who cry and complain about ball marks are often the ones that don't even repair their own, or make statements such as "I'm no ones servant!". You're not being a servant by helping to maintain the greens that you are playing on, and probably will play on again. You're being proactive and generous with your time. I guess I'm laid back enough to fix my own, my group's, and any other marks that I see without delaying play though. It doesn't bother me one bit and I enjoy helping to maintain the greens that I am a regular player on.

 

Also, this:  http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2010/10/repair-your-ball-marks.html  This is old, but crazy!

post #48 of 62

And while we're at it, here's how you make divots on a grass range. Strips, not scattered, not a landfill.

 

post #49 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post

And while we're at it, here's how you make divots on a grass range. Strips, not scattered, not a landfill.

 

 

Another great idea I never knew. I will definitely be doing this as I just got back from the range and noticed my divots were all over the place. Thanks.

post #50 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post

And while we're at it, here's how you make divots on a grass range. Strips, not scattered, not a landfill.

 

Some supers differ and think the grass grows in better and faster when the divots are not all linked together.

post #51 of 62

My experience is unless you're the first person to the range on the morning they've moved the ropes it's impossible to find enough clean ground to hit divots in a strip.

post #52 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by VMAN View Post

Some supers differ and think the grass grows in better and faster when the divots are not all linked together.

The numbers tell me that the strips are the way to go.  Let's say I am hitting wedges and take "dollar bill" type divots and hit 15 balls.  6" long x 3" wide times 15 shots equals 270 sq. inches of turf removed if you hit them in separate places each time.  If you do it in strips and put the next ball immediately behind the last ball then only the first divot is 6x3 and the rest are all going to be only 1 or 2 inches long.  Assuming 2, that comes out to 102 square inches of turf removed.

 

Now I don't know anything about how grass grows, so maybe these superintendents are right, but reducing the amount of grass that needs to regrow by 62% seems like the way to go to me.

 

And, Dave2512, when there are a lot of scattered divots already there, you can still start with one of them to make your strips, and basically "connect the dots."  Either way, you are taking less turf.

post #53 of 62

At least this thread is finally onto the topic of "divots"!!

post #54 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

The numbers tell me that the strips are the way to go.  Let's say I am hitting wedges and take "dollar bill" type divots and hit 15 balls.  6" long x 3" wide times 15 shots equals 270 sq. inches of turf removed if you hit them in separate places each time.  If you do it in strips and put the next ball immediately behind the last ball then only the first divot is 6x3 and the rest are all going to be only 1 or 2 inches long.  Assuming 2, that comes out to 102 square inches of turf removed.

 

Now I don't know anything about how grass grows, so maybe these superintendents are right, but reducing the amount of grass that needs to regrow by 62% seems like the way to go to me.

 

And, Dave2512, when there are a lot of scattered divots already there, you can still start with one of them to make your strips, and basically "connect the dots."  Either way, you are taking less turf.

I think you are right. The first reason to pattern divots in a strip is that you use much less turf by placing the ball right behind the last divot. The second I though was ease of reseeding and covering with sand: it is just faster if you only need to hit one strip and not fill dozens of smaller individual divots. The third is that the ground winds up more level as a result. 

 

It seems like a simple win-win to me and I would say those who disagree are simply wrong.

 

Re: ball marks on the green, I have regularly played a par three course full of them, and have been forced to give up on fixing one other than mine. I always fix mine and any in my vicinity, but I am not the greenskeeper and sadly don't have enough time and energy to repair the whole green. On a nice course it is rare to find a ball mark, but on a cheap course it is all too common and frustrating. I don't know whether it is uninformed beginners, or some sort of sociopath who leaves their ball mark. You would think there is a certain amount of ability required to put that spin and trajectory on the ball that the marks must come from better players, which sadly would suggest the sociopath is more likely.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Fixing divots on greens