or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › "The dumbest money in golf is spent on putters."
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"The dumbest money in golf is spent on putters." - Page 3

post #37 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post


I know what you're sayin'... but I created this thread to inspire thought, not lash out at 30 handicappers who think $2000 worth of clubs is going to make them any better...

In short, I think it's fair to say that the theoretical person you've created has "more money than brains..."


Or maybe they just worked hard for their money and want to enjoy some of it.  Sounds to me like youre just upset because not everyone agrees with you and the, "wisdom" of your old codger friend.

post #38 of 72

I'm going to agree with the OP's codger. It doesn't mean that all money spent on putters is dumb...

post #39 of 72

Just personal thoughts, but I don't see much difference between a Cameron and an Odyssey for half the price.

 

I'm not a club *****--for me to make a change in my bag, there has to be a performance-based reason.  Once I find something I like, I have to see some pretty interesting technology to make me want to change.  Drivers, hybrids, and woods have changed a lot over the last 10 years:  materials, shaft options, adjustability, etc. have made it much, much easier for golfers without access to a tour van to get something that really suits their game.

 

I simply can't say the same about putters.  Head shape, shaft placement, and shaft length are the three primary variables--and those haven't really changed much.  (Actually, I prefer a straight center shaft mallet, and those options have actually decreased over the last 5 years or so.)  Inserts are different, but IMO more gimmick than technological advancement.  The bottom line is that a well-struck putt with a face square to the intended line is going to go in the intended direction--and inserts won't affect that one bit.  Speed off of the face, which the insert might affect, is all about practicing pace--regardless of what putter you use.  You still have to stroke the ball with the proper pace to get consistent distance with your putter.

 

Of course, every post on such a topic is opinion, and this is mine.  I've been using the same putter for a while now--and I don't see much on the market to make me change.  The only thing I've even thought about is the Edel, but it's the precision fitting to achieve better alignment--rather than the technology--that intrigues me.

post #40 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-troop View Post

Just personal thoughts, but I don't see much difference between a Cameron and an Odyssey for half the price.

 

Of course, every post on such a topic is opinion, and this is mine.  I've been using the same putter for a while now--and I don't see much on the market to make me change.  The only thing I've even thought about is the Edel, but it's the precision fitting to achieve better alignment--rather than the technology--that intrigues me.

I think the real difference in putters is how your eyes work, which is where the Edel fitting comes into play.  I can pick up most putters and what I think is straight, or what I see as straight really isn't.  The difference between putters is simply how they feel to the individual and what we perceive as being lined up with the hole using the alignment aides, etc. 

 

If you find a putter that you know you're aiming where you want every time, it's a lot easier than trying to change your stroke towards a putter that you like the way it looks, like the name, etc.  Whether that's a $20 putter or a $400 putter, depends on the person behind it.  But then again, there's those naturally great putters who can pick up anything and make bombs with it.  Unfortunately, I'm just not one of those people, so finding a putter I'm comfortable with and hit where I'm aiming (although my line may not be right) is crucial for me.

post #41 of 72

I still love my Odyssey Crimson 660 and will never, ever, get rid of it. I bought it on a whim at a sporting goods store that had mis-labeled it at the time as it had a $29.99 price tag on it. I couldn't resist it. I even got a mis-matched "White Ice Tour" Odyssey boot putter cover for it and I was not complaining or trying to get the actual cover for the deal that I got. I notified the clerk that the putter was more or less marked under their competitors by $80.00 and the manager was probably having a bad day and quickly cut me off and said "I'll honor the tag" and rang it up.

 

I love that putter and baby it. It still has no scratches, or dings in it.

 

At the end of the day, I'm typically an "average" putter. I have days where I get hot, but I rarely go below average to "What the F is going on..." mode. I personally get careless with wedges and golf balls... that's where my "dumb money" gets spent.

post #42 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by x129 View Post

Any reason for that view? Do you know some one who spend 1000 hours practicing putting that is not really good (i.e top 10% at it)?  Personally i have never met a "natural" musician or artist. All the ones I know practiced a ton. Wether they practiced a ton because they were good at it or were good at it because the practiced a ton, I will leave up to you to decide.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

 

Not sure what to say other than when you meet one you'll know it. Good luck.

I have to strongly disagree with this 'natural' concept and nip it in the bud now.  Of the artists and musicians I know, talent has been the starting point yes, but they only got better after the 10k hours of deliberate practice.  Is it a valid association to compare to putting? That I don't know but would think that practice cannot hurt.

post #43 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by x129 View Post

Any reason for that view? Do you know some one who spend 1000 hours practicing putting that is not really good (i.e top 10% at it)?  Personally i have never met a "natural" musician or artist. All the ones I know practiced a ton. Wether they practiced a ton because they were good at it or were good at it because the practiced a ton, I will leave up to you to decide.

 

 

Now you have... nice to meet you. 

I have the natural - read unpracticed - ability to sit down and sketch pretty much anything.  I am a ringer when it comes to Pictionary. 

Do I get better when I practice?  Of course I do. 

However, I have an innate ability that allows me to draw better than most people on the planet.

post #44 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwdial View Post

 

Now you have... nice to meet you. 

I have the natural - read unpracticed - ability to sit down and sketch pretty much anything.  I am a ringer when it comes to Pictionary. 

Do I get better when I practice?  Of course I do. 

However, I have an innate ability that allows me to draw better than most people on the planet.

I have the innate ability to consume a case of beer during the course of a Cleveland Browns game while still maintaining moral integrity. That is a rare feat, especially in this city and as a Browns fan.

 

Off topic I know, but I wanted to brag too! c2_beer.gif

post #45 of 72

With the way Weeden played last week you might want to buy some more beer.   

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post

I have the innate ability to consume a case of beer during the course of a Cleveland Browns game while still maintaining moral integrity. That is a rare feat, especially in this city and as a Browns fan.

 

Off topic I know, but I wanted to brag too! c2_beer.gif

post #46 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoyHotPower View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

 

Not sure what to say other than when you meet one you'll know it. Good luck.

I have to strongly disagree with this 'natural' concept and nip it in the bud now.  Of the artists and musicians I know, talent has been the starting point yes, but they only got better after the 10k hours of deliberate practice.  Is it a valid association to compare to putting? That I don't know but would think that practice cannot hurt.

 

That's pretty much what I just said so I didn't read on.

post #47 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

With the way Weeden played last week you might want to buy some more beer.   
I'm stocked and ready! No where to go but up from a 5.1 passer rating and the worst debut in NFL rookie QB history since 1961! :(
post #48 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post



Well at this point I think we're making two different arguments... I mean, let's hold everything constant here.... Let's say there's a man with a 10 year old driver and a 10 year old putter in his bag... he uses both well... which should he replace? I say the driver...

then again, if he uses both poorly, obviously i'd say the putter. But that's not to say he has to drop $150+ on one... he probably just needs to try a new design that feels right...

 


I still say the putter because you will hole more longer putts with a new putter, on average, especially if you get a newer, higher MOI putter.  Improved putting is one of the best ways to shave strokes from your score.  Even if you go out and buy the best driver in the world, it all boils down to getting it into the hole when youre on the green.

 But you're making an assumption... Putting's all about how your putter feels... if his new high MOI putter makes him uncomfortable, i don't care how much it costs...

post #49 of 72

well, if you cant hit the center of the putter head when you putt than you have bigger problems...seriously, hit the ball with the center of the putter and all the high MOI is pretty much moot.  the most important thing is knowing where the putter is lined up - not necessarily where you think it is, or where the alignment thing is pointed.

post #50 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by WalkTheCourse View Post


I know what you're sayin'... but I created this thread to inspire thought, not lash out at 30 handicappers who think $2000 worth of clubs is going to make them any better...

In short, I think it's fair to say that the theoretical person you've created has "more money than brains..."


Or maybe they just worked hard for their money and want to enjoy some of it.  Sounds to me like youre just upset because not everyone agrees with you and the, "wisdom" of your old codger friend.


Okay, I know this was posted like five months ago, but I simply MUST respond...

I'm upset because not everyone agrees with me? Seriously? Do I sound upset? In a freakin' online golf forum?

So according to you, I'm apparently not allowed to respectfully disagree and defend my position... Bull feces.

I stand by my previous statement: I created this thread to inspire thought. The fact that there are dissenters makes the thread MORE interesting to me, therefore inspiring further conversation. Every dissenting reply towards me has been respectful, and every reply I have given has also been respectful. This has been a good conversation until you walked in the door.


Upset? With your presumptuous implications I most certainly am.

post #51 of 72
I tend to agree with the OP. got a cousin who is a golf pro. Said the putter is the one club that it dosent really matter. Aslong as it feels good to you it can be a $20 cheapy. A lot of putting happens upstairs.

Guess I just haven't found the right one yet :(
post #52 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wacky Tiger View Post

I tend to agree with the OP. got a cousin who is a golf pro. Said the putter is the one club that it dosent really matter. Aslong as it feels good to you it can be a $20 cheapy. A lot of putting happens upstairs.

Guess I just haven't found the right one yet :(


I think the putter is the club in the bag that matters the most.  What doesn't matter with a putter is the brand name, cost or style, which could be said about any club to a certain extent.  

 

I carry a $25 Dynacraft 7 Wood because I hit it better than the big named brands I've bought to replace it, which never lasts and old cheap reliable goes back in the bag.  

post #53 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bullitt5339 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wacky Tiger View Post

I tend to agree with the OP. got a cousin who is a golf pro. Said the putter is the one club that it dosent really matter. Aslong as it feels good to you it can be a $20 cheapy. A lot of putting happens upstairs.

Guess I just haven't found the right one yet :(


I think the putter is the club in the bag that matters the most.  What doesn't matter with a putter is the brand name, cost or style, which could be said about any club to a certain extent.  

 

I carry a $25 Dynacraft 7 Wood because I hit it better than the big named brands I've bought to replace it, which never lasts and old cheap reliable goes back in the bag.  

Yeah I worded that wrong. Yes the putter does matter but the name does not. I.e spending $200 plus on a big name is not really necessary when a$20 cheapy feels right. Really is just try before you buy.
post #54 of 72

I went through about dozen putters: experimented with length, tried different type of putters, grips (fat vs regular), etc..  For me, Odyssey White Dot #2 (-1 inch, fat grip) works best for me.  It's easy to (comparison) test two putters if you have putting surface, willingness to measure the putting results, etc.. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › "The dumbest money in golf is spent on putters."