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Anchored Putters Rules Change (Effective January 1, 2016) - Page 68

post #1207 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chas View Post


How's about bringing back the little mounds of dirt/sand and banning the use of tees? GC length would be substantially reduced ....

 

Not for Laura Davis

post #1208 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chas View Post


 Personally I think that a free hour with a shrink should come with every new USGA membership .... :>)
'

 

That's one way to grow the game a2_wink.gif
post #1209 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by northighlandway View Post

Add the anchored putter.......bring back the wooden driver head, buldge, roll and all. That would answer a lot of issues with the ball and

redesign (lengthing courses).

 

That misses the point that this is not an equipment regulation, it's a regulation governing "what is a stroke?"

post #1210 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by bplewis24 View Post

.... and get the endorsement of the psych community. Follow the money.
post #1211 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

It sure hasn't worked out too well for tennis.  It wasn't that long ago that TV ratings for tennis were much higher than those for golf.  But tennis wanted the game to be easier and promoted larger racket sizes.  As a result the pro game changed completely as the balance between serve/volley and ground-strokes was tilted towards the latter.  And it turned out that watching 2 people slug the ball back and forth wasn't nearly as entertaining as watching an all-court game where thee were a wider variety of shot types.  So now tennis ratings are in the toilet in comparison to golf.  Recreational play is way down as well. 

 

It is a cautionary tale for golf. 

Interesting points, however ... you made a couple of conclusions that I'm not sure you can make here; based on the data you provided, at least.

 

1.  Just because tennis used to be more popular on TV than golf and it now isn't doesn't really say anything about its overall popularity.  They could have both grown since then, yet tennis just at a much smaller rate.

 

2.  And if there is a decline, who's to say its the style of game that has caused it?  My guess would be that it also would have something to do with the lack of a quantity of good players (I don't mind it, but its probably less exciting to a lot of people to know that its going to be Federer, Nadal, Murray, and Djokovic in every final four.)  Also, at least here, there isn't any good American players right now (short of the oft-injured Williams sisters)

 

3.  Lastly, not sure you can make the correlation between a decline in the tv ratings of the pros with the recreational play decline either.  I would have a lot less interest in playing if I had to smack it around with a tiny wooden racket.  And I highly doubt there are any people out there not playing tennis specifically because its too easy.

 

Again, not saying you are wrong, just that you didn't provide the info to back up what appear to be assumptions.

post #1212 of 1852

Bottom line is that amateurs want to have fun, and I agree with PGA Tour Radio's Brian Katrek and I've added some color commentary on his take, which essentially that there are 3 types of amateurs. 

1) Avid, above average player, plays "by the rules", and plays in amateur tournaments (USGA, State, Club, etc). Most of these events offer conditions of competition that allow the use of a power cart & rangefinder...both of which are not allowed on the PGA Tour. Why can't an anchored putter also be allowed as a Condition of Competition!?

2) Average handicap, golf enthusiast. Plays at public or private golf club. "Who cares if they use an anchored putter?! They already use those goofy chipping clubs and take mulligans!"

3) Beginner - Again, who cares if they play with a hockey stick & a beach ball? Let them have fun & anchor away!

 

At the end of the day, all of the above constituents want to "play like the pros" even though even the scratch player has no chance of playing like a Tour pro. And because the core of the game are the amateurs (not Tour Pros), anchored putting should continue to be allowed. Statistically, it has not been proven that anchoring your putter makes you a better putter!

post #1213 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by clydesdalecm View Post

Bottom line is that amateurs want to have fun, and I agree with PGA Tour Radio's Brian Katrek and I've added some color commentary on his take, which essentially that there are 3 types of amateurs. 
1) Avid, above average player, plays "by the rules", and plays in amateur tournaments (USGA, State, Club, etc). Most of these events offer conditions of competition that allow the use of a power cart & rangefinder...both of which are not allowed on the PGA Tour. Why can't an anchored putter also be allowed as a Condition of Competition!?
2) Average handicap, golf enthusiast. Plays at public or private golf club. "Who cares if they use an anchored putter?! They already use those goofy chipping clubs and take mulligans!"
3) Beginner - Again, who cares if they play with a hockey stick & a beach ball? Let them have fun & anchor away!

At the end of the day, all of the above constituents want to "play like the pros" even though even the scratch player has no chance of playing like a Tour pro. And because the core of the game are the amateurs (not Tour Pros), anchored putting should continue to be allowed. Statistically, it has not been proven that anchoring your putter makes you a better putter!
Regarding #1 ... You have it backwards I believe. Those examples you provide are not against the rules of golf, whereas anchored putting would be. It's not a C of C that they are allowed in am tourneys, its a C of C that they AREN'T allowed on the PGA tour. A CC allowing anchored putting would directly go against the rules of golf.
post #1214 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by clydesdalecm View Post

Bottom line is that amateurs want to have fun, and I agree with PGA Tour Radio's Brian Katrek and I've added some color commentary on his take, which essentially that there are 3 types of amateurs. 
1) Avid, above average player, plays "by the rules", and plays in amateur tournaments (USGA, State, Club, etc). Most of these events offer conditions of competition that allow the use of a power cart & rangefinder...both of which are not allowed on the PGA Tour. Why can't an anchored putter also be allowed as a Condition of Competition!?
2) Average handicap, golf enthusiast. Plays at public or private golf club. "Who cares if they use an anchored putter?! They already use those goofy chipping clubs and take mulligans!"
3) Beginner - Again, who cares if they play with a hockey stick & a beach ball? Let them have fun & anchor away!

At the end of the day, all of the above constituents want to "play like the pros" even though even the scratch player has no chance of playing like a Tour pro. And because the core of the game are the amateurs (not Tour Pros), anchored putting should continue to be allowed. Statistically, it has not been proven that anchoring your putter makes you a better putter!
Regarding #1 ... You have it backwards I believe. Those examples you provide are not against the rules of golf, whereas anchored putting would be. It's not a C of C that they are allowed in am tourneys, its a C of C that they AREN'T allowed on the PGA tour. A CC allowing anchored putting would directly go against the rules of golf.

 

Actually allowing electronic measuring devices does require employing the local rule for it.  Allowing golf carts does not.

post #1215 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

Actually allowing electronic measuring devices does require employing the local rule for it.  Allowing golf carts does not.
Oh. In that case, my apologies to Clydesdale. (50% at least) ;)
post #1216 of 1852

Any, not just electronic, distance measuring device (eg a tape measure) requires a Local Rule not a Condition of Competition. The Rules themselves specifically permit the Committee to make such a Local Rule.

 

If a Rule existed prohibiting something (eg red clubs) then a Local Rule or Condition of Competition may not be made allowing them, unless that Rule had a clause permitting a Local Rule to allow them.

post #1217 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rulesman View Post

Any, not just electronic, distance measuring device (eg a tape measure) requires a Local Rule not a Condition of Competition. T
he Rules themselves specifically permit the Committee to make such a Local Rule.


If a Rule existed prohibiting something (eg red clubs) then a Local Rule or Condition of Competition may not be made allowing them, unless that Rule had a clause permitting a Local Rule to allow them.
True, true I write all the rules sheets for my association. You cannot just decide to allow something because the club members want to do it. This is why you cannot legally institute a tree root rule.
post #1218 of 1852

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NM Golf View Post


True, true I write all the rules sheets for my association. You cannot just decide to allow something because the club members want to do it. This is why you cannot legally institute a tree root rule.

 

Agree, but we both know that such local Rules exist, and all the club members now believe that it is a legitimate local Rule!  It's too bad that correct rulings don't travel as fast or as far as incorrect rulings!

post #1219 of 1852

All the last 6 posts have done is confuse me.  a1_smile.gif

post #1220 of 1852

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bplewis24 View Post

All the last 6 posts have done is confuse me.  a1_smile.gif

 

And the first 1212 posts didn't have that effect?

post #1221 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post

The AL east is what drives TV ratings so it has helped baseball.

 

It will all be irrelevant soon - with inter-league play every day, the NL will be forced to adapt (the players association will win over the *purists*)

I would suggest you look at attendance numbers and local TV ratings before you state that.

 

BTW, 7 of the 8 MLB teams at the bottom in attendance in 2012 were AL teams. The DH has nothing to do with ratings or attendance, and it certainly has nothing in common with bannng the anchored stroke in golf.

 

http://espn.go.com/mlb/attendance/_/year/2012

 

Lay off my NL baseball.c4_mad.gif

post #1222 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by phan52 View Post

I would suggest you look at attendance numbers and local TV ratings before you state that.

BTW, 7 of the 8 MLB teams at the bottom in attendance in 2012 were AL teams. The DH has nothing to do with ratings or attendance, and it certainly has nothing in common with bannng the anchored stroke in golf.

http://espn.go.com/mlb/attendance/_/year/2012

Lay off my NL baseball.c4_mad.gif

You will notice that I never mentioned attendance or *local* tv ratings.

National tv wants the AL east. 100 share in Milwaukee still brings in less cash than a 10 share in New York.
post #1223 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by phan52 View Post

I would suggest you look at attendance numbers and local TV ratings before you state that.

BTW, 7 of the 8 MLB teams at the bottom in attendance in 2012 were AL teams. The DH has nothing to do with ratings or attendance, and it certainly has nothing in common with bannng the anchored stroke in golf.

http://espn.go.com/mlb/attendance/_/year/2012

Lay off my NL baseball.c4_mad.gif

You will notice that I never mentioned attendance or *local* tv ratings.

National tv wants the AL east. 100 share in Milwaukee still brings in less cash than a 10 share in New York.

 

Last time I looked the Mets were still in the NL.  And numbers for the Yankees have nothing to do with the DH.  Half the country thinks they're Yankee fans just because it's the first baseball team they ever heard of - it's too easy to just jump on the bandwagon.  I'd rather watch just about any NL game, just for the managing strategy if nothing else.  The interleague games can be amusing though - nothing funnier than watching an AL pitcher trying to bunt when he hasn't touched a bat since little league.  b2_tongue.gif

 

There is more skill involved in managing an NL team, just as there is more skill involved in a free swinging putting stroke.

post #1224 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

Last time I looked the Mets were still in the NL.

Despite their best efforts over the last decade to get relegated to AAA. b2_tongue.gif

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