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Anchored Putters Rules Change (Effective January 1, 2016) - Page 97

post #1729 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Right.  The grooves ban was a ban on equipment, and it made virtually every wedge manufactured (I think, maybe I'm wrong) in a 15-20 period illegal.  So without the grandfathering, you'd be requiring all amateur golfers to either spend money on new wedges, or go find 20 year old pieces of junk in their garage.  Not very nice, or even practical.

With the anchoring ban, even for those anchorers who want to switch to a short putter, it would be pretty easy for them to find one in their garage or at a used store for really, really cheap.

Please recall that the groove requirements apply to all clubs with a loft of 25 degrees or higher, not just wedges.

The change for anchoring is a Rule change and the next Rules code isn't applicable until Jan. 1, 2016. It was just advance notice of the change to be made to the Rules.
post #1730 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

It won't do any good, but I emailed the general PGA address, Joe Bishop, and some others a very short reply saying that I fully support the USGA and the R&A's anchoring ban, and directly oppose the PGA's for any actions it takes to delay or oppose the proposed rules change.

 

They are trying to equate this with the groove change, yet they are very different issues - the only similarity is superficial at best in that both have some involvement in club use.  Otherwise they have no relationship.  One was truly a change in conforming club design, the other is a change in the allowed method for making a stroke.  One affected nearly every player in the world, as square grooves had been in common and popular use for some 2 decades, while the anchored putting stroke is used by a tiny minority of golfers.  The groove change requires players to ultimately replace their outdated clubs, which could have been a significant financial burden on many amateur players if they had been immediately required to make the change.  The anchor ban only requires them to change the way they swing the club, which can be done with a few hours of practice.  

 

This is nothing more than a final attempt to push their own agenda and assuage their collective egos.  They continue to confuse and conceal their real mission with a phony front that makes them look like they are trying to cater to a significant portion of their golfing population, in the hope that the underinformed public will support them.  Hopefully the ruling bodies will hold their ground and put a quick end to this last ditch attempt to find support for a nonexistent cause.

 

Edit:  Looks like we are all on the same page. :doh:

post #1731 of 1852

I'm half-tempted to just email them a link to this thread.  :-D  I mean, assuming they haven't stumbled upon it in their "research".

post #1732 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Right.  The grooves ban was a ban on equipment, and it made virtually every wedge manufactured (I think, maybe I'm wrong) in a 15-20 period illegal.  So without the grandfathering, you'd be requiring all amateur golfers to either spend money on new wedges, or go find 20 year old pieces of junk in their garage.  Not very nice, or even practical.

 

With the anchoring ban, even for those anchorers who want to switch to a short putter, it would be pretty easy for them to find one in their garage or at a used store for really, really cheap.

Whats makes it cheaper for people to buy new putters vs wedges?

 

Last I checked putters generally cost more than wedges.

post #1733 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post
 

Whats makes it cheaper for people to buy new putters vs wedges?

 

Last I checked putters generally cost more than wedges.

 

How many putters do you carry?

How many wedges do you carry?

post #1734 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave67az View Post
 

 

How many putters do you carry?

How many wedges do you carry?

In theory 5 wedges (even if 2 came with my iron set) - putter still cost more

post #1735 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post
 

Whats makes it cheaper for people to buy new putters vs wedges?

 

The anchored stroke ban doesn't force anyone to buy a new putter.

 

And golfers who care about the rules likely have several putters they can still use. Putters don't wear out like grooves on wedges.

post #1736 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

The anchored stroke ban doesn't force anyone to buy a new putter.

 

I can understand how I will still be using my long putter, but can you explain to me how a belly putter will be useful unanchored?

post #1737 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post
 

I can understand how I will still be using my long putter, but can you explain to me how a belly putter will be useful unanchored?

 

Use it like Matt Kuchar. Or just have the end waving around. Or cut it down to the appropriate length. Or bend it more upright to use it like Ray Floyd. Etc.

 

Plus I don't really care. As you well know, I support the rule, and think three years or so was plenty of notice.

post #1738 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Right.  The grooves ban was a ban on equipment, and it made virtually every wedge manufactured (I think, maybe I'm wrong) in a 15-20 period illegal.  So without the grandfathering, you'd be requiring all amateur golfers to either spend money on new wedges, or go find 20 year old pieces of junk in their garage.  Not very nice, or even practical.

 

With the anchoring ban, even for those anchorers who want to switch to a short putter, it would be pretty easy for them to find one in their garage or at a used store for really, really cheap.

Whats makes it cheaper for people to buy new putters vs wedges?

 

Last I checked putters generally cost more than wedges.

 

Since every club with a loft higher than 25° (6 or 7 iron and up) is required to have the new grooves, for many players that means an entire new set of irons, not just 2 or 3 wedges.  No matter how you shake it, you still only have to carry one putter.  And, just for your information, I've never paid more than $84 for any putter I've ever owned.  Buying a $300 putter is no substitute for learning how to putt.

 

As it was a year ago, you won't find much sympathy here.

post #1739 of 1852
I am a 55 year old weekend golfer who almost gave up the game of golf four years ago because of the "yips" when putting. I tried many things to correct this problem with no success. My father suggested I try a long putter. OMG, my three putts were a thing of the past. My handicap dropped from an 18 to an 11. The joy of the game has returned. After reading the many post on this subject, I can tell you that I will not give up my putter. I play in a association with 120 members and I have talked to many of them about my putter choice. Nome of them feel I am cheating. When January 2016 arrives, I will still play this great game with my long putter. I am a weekend amateur, I play for the joy of the game, not for money.
post #1740 of 1852

It isn't a long putter that will be prohibited, just anchoring a club against your body.  It depends on what you are actually doing with your putter whether you will be breaking the rules or not.

post #1741 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfoholic View Post

I am a 55 year old weekend golfer who almost gave up the game of golf four years ago because of the "yips" when putting. I tried many things to correct this problem with no success. My father suggested I try a long putter. OMG, my three putts were a thing of the past. My handicap dropped from an 18 to an 11. The joy of the game has returned. After reading the many post on this subject, I can tell you that I will not give up my putter. I play in a association with 120 members and I have talked to many of them about my putter choice. Nome of them feel I am cheating. When January 2016 arrives, I will still play this great game with my long putter. I am a weekend amateur, I play for the joy of the game, not for money.

 

That's fine, but if you continue to putt with an anchored stroke, your handicap will no longer have any meaning or validity.  That 11 will once again just be a number between 10 and 12.

 

I'm 67 years old and got the yips about 10-12 years ago.  I started trying every putter I could get my hands on, as long as I didn't have to pay for it, and eventually found one that a buddy built from components bought at Golfsmith.  I played 9 holes with his putter and had 5 one putt greens.  I had him  build one for me and I've used it ever since.  I'm a better putter now than I was when I was 30.  No yips, and I putt with confidence.  Standard length putter, funny looking but legal clubhead.  It has a bit more of a "dead" feel than any other putter I've ever used, and that makes me strike the ball a little more firmly, which helps me to putt aggressively even on short, fast putts.  I also use a relatively short backswing on shorter putts, which also helps to promote an aggressive stroke with a good follow through.

post #1742 of 1852
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfoholic View Post

After reading the many post on this subject, I can tell you that I will not give up my putter. I play in a association with 120 members and I have talked to many of them about my putter choice. Nome of them feel I am cheating. When January 2016 arrives, I will still play this great game with my long putter. I am a weekend amateur, I play for the joy of the game, not for money.

 

You don't have to give up your putter, just make sure not to anchor it.  I know a very good player that is planning to do just that.  The handle will be just in front of his sternum, rather than touching the sternum.  If you continue to anchor in 2016, you won't be able to have a valid handicap.

post #1743 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfoholic View Post

I am a 55 year old weekend golfer who almost gave up the game of golf four years ago because of the "yips" when putting. I tried many things to correct this problem with no success. My father suggested I try a long putter. OMG, my three putts were a thing of the past. My handicap dropped from an 18 to an 11. The joy of the game has returned. After reading the many post on this subject, I can tell you that I will not give up my putter. I play in a association with 120 members and I have talked to many of them about my putter choice. Nome of them feel I am cheating. When January 2016 arrives, I will still play this great game with my long putter. I am a weekend amateur, I play for the joy of the game, not for money.

 

You really ought to try and find something that will work just as well, TM spider putters are some of the most stable putter heads I have ever tried it's almost impossible to yip this putter, don't let 1 rule change keep you from playing club tournaments.

post #1744 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

That's fine, but if you continue to putt with an anchored stroke, your handicap will no longer have any meaning or validity.  That 11 will once again just be a number between 10 and 12.

 

I'm 67 years old and got the yips about 10-12 years ago.  I started trying every putter I could get my hands on, as long as I didn't have to pay for it, and eventually found one that a buddy built from components bought at Golfsmith.  I played 9 holes with his putter and had 5 one putt greens.  I had him  build one for me and I've used it ever since.  I'm a better putter now than I was when I was 30.  No yips, and I putt with confidence.  Standard length putter, funny looking but legal clubhead.  It has a bit more of a "dead" feel than any other putter I've ever used, and that makes me strike the ball a little more firmly, which helps me to putt aggressively even on short, fast putts.  I also use a relatively short backswing on shorter putts, which also helps to promote an aggressive stroke with a good follow through.

@Fourputt , can you post a picture of this putter head?  I am curious.

 

It will be interesting to see what Adam Scott does.  He anchors now and I'm not sure if he will be able to convert to not anchoring with that long putter.

post #1745 of 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

That's fine, but if you continue to putt with an anchored stroke, your handicap will no longer have any meaning or validity.  That 11 will once again just be a number between 10 and 12.

 

I'm 67 years old and got the yips about 10-12 years ago.  I started trying every putter I could get my hands on, as long as I didn't have to pay for it, and eventually found one that a buddy built from components bought at Golfsmith.  I played 9 holes with his putter and had 5 one putt greens.  I had him  build one for me and I've used it ever since.  I'm a better putter now than I was when I was 30.  No yips, and I putt with confidence.  Standard length putter, funny looking but legal clubhead.  It has a bit more of a "dead" feel than any other putter I've ever used, and that makes me strike the ball a little more firmly, which helps me to putt aggressively even on short, fast putts.  I also use a relatively short backswing on shorter putts, which also helps to promote an aggressive stroke with a good follow through.

@Fourputt , can you post a picture of this putter head?  I am curious.

 

It will be interesting to see what Adam Scott does.  He anchors now and I'm not sure if he will be able to convert to not anchoring with that long putter.

 

 

It's a milled aluminum body with a black insert.  The 2 "warp engines" are stainless steel.  I know that it looks like a gimmick, but it works for us old guys with the yips.  I've known 2 other guys who absolutely swear by it.  But not everyone who has tried mine has liked it.  The "dead" feel does take some getting used to.

 

Interestingly, it's no longer available from Golfsmith.  That photo was from a seller called Golf Link.  They have it available for $49.97.  When I had mine made, the head alone cost more than that.  Mine was built for $72.

post #1746 of 1852

Excellent @Fourputt !  I am a Star Trek fan too!  But I think I'll stick with my Anser style putter.

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