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Tournament Do's and Don'ts - Page 2

post #19 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachcomber View Post

If a player / opponent has a laser range finder.  And gets the yardage.  And I ask him what he measured it as... That isn't a breach of asking your opponent for advice? 

 

If it's a tournament, the player using the range finder is breaking the rules.

post #20 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipazoid View Post

If it's a tournament, the player using the range finder is breaking the rules.

Not necessarily. The tournament committee can, and often does enact a local rule allowing the use of distance measuring devices.

I haven't played in a tournament in the last 2 years that didn't do so.
post #21 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


Not necessarily. The tournament committee can, and often does enact a local rule allowing the use of distance measuring devices.
I haven't played in a tournament in the last 2 years that didn't do so.

 

Ah, ok. I know this was a bone of contention before. I haven't played a tournament in a few years so I'm not up on the use of distance devices.

post #22 of 74

As far as information that is considered advice ... at what point does it become illegal to ask?

 

For example, I show up for a tournament at a course I have never played before.  I want to ask a friend, who is a fellow competitor and who has played the course before, if he has any tips for me.  Obviously, that is illegal during the round, but is it illegal before the round?  Does it become illegal once we walk onto the first tee, or is it once you arrive at the course?  Does it matter who you ask?  Somebody who's not in your foursome, or somebody who's in another flight?

post #23 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

As far as information that is considered advice ... at what point does it become illegal to ask?

 

For example, I show up for a tournament at a course I have never played before.  I want to ask a friend, who is a fellow competitor and who has played the course before, if he has any tips for me.  Obviously, that is illegal during the round, but is it illegal before the round?  Does it become illegal once we walk onto the first tee, or is it once you arrive at the course?  Does it matter who you ask?  Somebody who's not in your foursome, or somebody who's in another flight?

 

The relevant rule is:

 

8-1. Advice
During a stipulated round, a player must not:

a. give advice to anyone in the competition playing on the course other than his partner, or
b. ask for advice from anyone other than his partner or either of their caddies.

And the definition of the "stipulated round" is:

Stipulated Round: The "stipulated round" consists of playing the holes of the course in their correct sequence unless otherwise authorized by the Committee. The number of holes in a stipulated round is 18 unless a smaller number is authorized by the Committee.

So you may give or receive any advice up until you start your stipulated round (upon hitting your first shot from the first tee). I believe that if the round is suspended at any point (weather, safety etc) then you may also receive advice during the suspension of play.

post #24 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipazoid View Post

 

Ah, ok. I know this was a bone of contention before. I haven't played a tournament in a few years so I'm not up on the use of distance devices.

Range finders that provide distance only, are legal for play under USGA rules. Those that provide slope, temperature, altitude correction, and club selection are not permitted to be used unless those functions are disabled.  I use my Leupold 4Xi, but I have to use it with the "dummy" face plate on it.

post #25 of 74

DO...

1.  Have a solid working knowledge of the Rules of Golf.  This should be job ONE.  There is no excuse for being penalized because you made an incorrect drop, or most any other procedural mistake.  We all live with one stroke penalties like dropping out of a hazard, but we don't have to live with an additional 2 stroke penalty for playing from a wrong place, or moving a loose impediment when it isn't allowed.

2.  Play your normal game, same routine.  This is your comfort zone - what got you to your current handicap.  Use that to your benefit.

3.  HAVE FUN!!!  If you aren't having fun, then why are you out there?

 

DON'T...

1.  Get out of your normal warmup routine.  This means don't go to the range and hit 100 balls if you normally just hit 30.  

2.  Spend an hour on the putting green if you normally spend 15 minutes.  

3.  Change or speed up or slow down your usual shot routine.

4.  Put any more emphasis on this round than any other round you play.  It's still just golf. (I know - easier said than done)

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by zipazoid View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


Not necessarily. The tournament committee can, and often does enact a local rule allowing the use of distance measuring devices.
I haven't played in a tournament in the last 2 years that didn't do so.

 

Ah, ok. I know this was a bone of contention before. I haven't played a tournament in a few years so I'm not up on the use of distance devices.

 

 

I know that the Colorado Golf Association allows them in all competitions except (I think) the Colorado Open.  Like David in FL, I haven't played or officiated a tournament in recent years where they weren't allowed.

post #26 of 74
If your mind is on proper drops before you go into a tourney ... Chances are you should not be in the tourney...

Your mind needs to be on CM
I know I'm playing well when it feels like auto pilot
I have a sniff a birdie nearly every hole and pars are very routine
My mind leading up is getting myself on auto pilot...

I want to play the higher percentage shots and my goal is regulation and I want to birdie 1 par 3 and two of the 5's if I can do that I'm 3 under

Generally every course is set up to pretty easy fir/gir

Now pick your 3 birdie holes the rest is auto pilot....




Now what drops and why would that be on your mind?
post #27 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBVegas View Post

If your mind is on proper drops before you go into a tourney ... Chances are you should not be in the tourney...
Your mind needs to be on CM
I know I'm playing well when it feels like auto pilot
I have a sniff a birdie nearly every hole and pars are very routine
My mind leading up is getting myself on auto pilot...
I want to play the higher percentage shots and my goal is regulation and I want to birdie 1 par 3 and two of the 5's if I can do that I'm 3 under
Generally every course is set up to pretty easy fir/gir
Now pick your 3 birdie holes the rest is auto pilot....
Now what drops and why would that be on your mind?

You're a +0.7 so I imagine you play tournaments all of the time?  So I get where you are coming from.  If you are on the tee of a par 3 and are wondering about where you can drop after you hit it into the water, then yeah, you are not in the right mindset.  (I think this thread is for more basic stuff for those of us who are green when it comes to tournaments)

 

But as a person who has NEVER played in an individual tournament in his life, the little things all matter.  So when 100% of the time leading up to this point you haven't taken a second to even bother considering what is and what isn't a proper drop, its a good idea to find that out BEFORE the tournament, THEN you can concentrate on course management and focus during the tournament.

 

Same goes true for a lot of the other valuable info that I'm getting here.  I know this thread isn't for me personally, but I'm now 10 days out from my first, so it feels like its for me.  Keep all of these gems coming, please!

post #28 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

You're a +0.7 so I imagine you play tournaments all of the time?  So I get where you are coming from.  If you are on the tee of a par 3 and are wondering about where you can drop after you hit it into the water, then yeah, you are not in the right mindset.  (I think this thread is for more basic stuff for those of us who are green when it comes to tournaments)

 

But as a person who has NEVER played in an individual tournament in his life, the little things all matter.  So when 100% of the time leading up to this point you haven't taken a second to even bother considering what is and what isn't a proper drop, its a good idea to find that out BEFORE the tournament, THEN you can concentrate on course management and focus during the tournament.

 

Same goes true for a lot of the other valuable info that I'm getting here.  I know this thread isn't for me personally, but I'm now 10 days out from my first, so it feels like its for me.  Keep all of these gems coming, please!

GD, if you go to my Youtube channel and look at my favorites list

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=FL7FgHqbAFYYAEfqh4zO9pbA

 

Go to the 60th video and from like 60 to 80 there are 20 short videos on rulings that are from the USGA.  They are like one to two minute videos, but good to watch as they make it super simple to understand the proper rules of the game.  Good to refresh yourself with some of these more common rules before you go play in a tournament.

post #29 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachcomber View Post

GD, if you go to my Youtube channel and look at my favorites list

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=FL7FgHqbAFYYAEfqh4zO9pbA

 

Go to the 60th video and from like 60 to 80 there are 20 short videos on rulings that are from the USGA.  They are like one to two minute videos, but good to watch as they make it super simple to understand the proper rules of the game.  Good to refresh yourself with some of these more common rules before you go play in a tournament.

Sweet, thanks!  I'll check these out tonight.  (I happily roam here all day during work, but not with sound c3_clap.gif)

post #30 of 74

The Leupolds with slope were not legal for tournament play even if you put in the dummy face plate as of late last year. Has there been a ruling change since then? 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwave916 View Post

Range finders that provide distance only, are legal for play under USGA rules. Those that provide slope, temperature, altitude correction, and club selection are not permitted to be used unless those functions are disabled.  I use my Leupold 4Xi, but I have to use it with the "dummy" face plate on it.

post #31 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipazoid View Post

Ah, ok. I know this was a bone of contention before. I haven't played a tournament in a few years so I'm not up on the use of distance devices.

Other than scrambles (barely golf) I've never been allowed to use a rangefinder in a tournament.
post #32 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBVegas View Post

If your mind is on proper drops before you go into a tourney ... Chances are you should not be in the tourney...

Your mind needs to be on CM
I know I'm playing well when it feels like auto pilot
I have a sniff a birdie nearly every hole and pars are very routine
My mind leading up is getting myself on auto pilot...

I want to play the higher percentage shots and my goal is regulation and I want to birdie 1 par 3 and two of the 5's if I can do that I'm 3 under

Generally every course is set up to pretty easy fir/gir

Now pick your 3 birdie holes the rest is auto pilot....




Now what drops and why would that be on your mind?

 

You are a .7 index, of course you don't think about water hazards and such.  Most golfers fly a Piper Cub with no autopilot.  Lot's of us play and love tournament golf with double digit handicaps.  We aren't so certain about where the ball is going.  And I never said you should be worrying about where to drop, what I said was that should learn those procedures and know them BEFORE playing in a competition or you are very likely to do it incorrectly (I started studying the rules more than 2 years before I ever played in a tournament because that's how I wanted to play the game).  I've played in club competitions for more than 20 years and new members who haven't played tournament golf before are always uncertain at best about relief procedures.  I've worked as a rules official at the state level and even in those tournaments there is a lot of uncertainty about it.

 

I can't count how many times I've had to talk a fellow competitor through the process of taking relief and making the drop. It's simple stuff to learn, but too many don't bother when playing casual golf - just flip a ball out wherever and play on.  Then they get the opportunity to join a tournament club and find out that following those procedures correctly is now a key part of the game.  Do it wrong and your fellow competitors are going to call you on it.

post #33 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by x129 View Post

The Leupolds with slope were not legal for tournament play even if you put in the dummy face plate as of late last year. Has there been a ruling change since then? 

I stand corrected. "Rule 14-3 prohibits the use of DMDs. However, a Committee or Golf Club may introduce a Local Rule permitting the use of devices which are capable of measuring distance and distance only"

 

So now my question is with the Leupold and the features that are not considered legal. The USGA uses language "disabled/switched off"  One could argue that the features are disabled when the face plate containing the micro chip is removed. Someone else might argue that the features are not part of the rangefinder without the faceplate.  Leupold claims that the device is legal in that configuration. Now, I'm not so sure I'd agree with them.

post #34 of 74

Unfortunately I can't find the ruling but here is a blog post about it. http://leupoldgx-4.com/leupold-gx-4-rangefinder/

 

 

Tournament Illegal

Leupold took a gamble with this design of the Leupold GX-4 Rangefinder. Unfortunately, this design gamble did not pay off. The United States Golf Association a.k.a. USGA, ruled the Leupold GX-4 Rangefinder as an illegal rangefinder for tournament play regardless of whether it is used in standard line-of-sight mode, with the use of the chrome faceplate or slope-compensating mode, with the use of the yellow, Smart Key faceplate.Try Leupold GX-4 Rangefinder now!

 

If the people/tournaments are reals serious (i.e. if they would object to you using your iPhone GPS), you probably shouldn't be using 4i for a round. I know it sounds stupid but to be fair it is pretty easy to chrome up a part so if you don't trust the players, banning makes sense.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigwave916 View Post

I stand corrected. "Rule 14-3 prohibits the use of DMDs. However, a Committee or Golf Club may introduce a Local Rule permitting the use of devices which are capable of measuring distance and distance only"

 

So now my question is with the Leupold and the features that are not considered legal. The USGA uses language "disabled/switched off"  One could argue that the features are disabled when the face plate containing the micro chip is removed. Someone else might argue that the features are not part of the rangefinder without the faceplate.  Leupold claims that the device is legal in that configuration. Now, I'm not so sure I'd agree with them.

post #35 of 74

Hey guys...  im not bashing anyone...  trust me 0.7 or not we all have struggles ...  I can be a +6 on thursday and a 12 on friday..  this is golf..  but no matter the level if your at a point in your game where you want to play a tourney the rules will come..  you will learn as you play just go there and have fun... do YOUR thing get yourself on your autopilot ..  if your a 10 get in your 10 auto pilot..

we all hit in water and will have to drop now is your chance to say hey is there a drop what are my options from here?  trust me.. your playing partners and caddies will be more than happy to assist... no matter the level ...  after all it's a competition but remember they can't advise on what to do but they can tell you the options...
 

if your at tourney level your past the point of green.. you may be tourney green but your not green at golf...

tourney golf is "real" golf.. no gimmies.. no lie adjustment you land in divot your in a divot... and you play by the rules that everyone knows but in casual play does not abide by.... 


tourney golf is 90% mental and thinking that way 

you say I know where my shot is going each time? listen 

you know what makes me a 1 not a 10?  my mind frame.. I hit the ball no better than you can.. I just do it 9/10 times...

a 10 thinks about bad shit that can happen during this shot...


im on tee 1 in tourney my mind looks where I want to land.. if I top the ball and it go's in the water then I figure out where to drop and move on now im hitting 3...  I don't think oh shit now im hitting 3 I gotta get close to the pin to save par... I mean the goal to begin with was to hit it near the pin right? now I go putt if I make it I'm good...  if not I got bogey and move on..  now hole 2 I look at landing and hit it there..  now I get up and hit a great 8 into the green and drop a 12 footer now im back even no difference and you can't change your mood...  

I went from a 18-1 in a year...

I mean I played my whole life had highschool medals  jr medals 

then I owned a business and decided to get back into it competivily last year around oct...  my first tourney last year I shot a 90..  in am tour...  now im in 70's all the time... Ive moved up from starters tour im in all scratch divisions..

im just sharing what helped me turn the curve from a 10 to a 1....    it's mental at this point...  your capiable of hitting the same shots I do... a pro told me today.. the lowest rounds are the most boring rounds... figure 260 down middle straight, 170 in, 2 putt go.. maybe birdie 2 or 3 holes maybe 6

 but it looks and feels boring no effort...  thats the next mental attitude im going to try.. see if it lowers it...

post #36 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwave916 View Post

Range finders that provide distance only, are legal for play under USGA rules. Those that provide slope, temperature, altitude correction, and club selection are not permitted to be used unless those functions are disabled.  I use my Leupold 4Xi, but I have to use it with the "dummy" face plate on it.


I thought that if the device even has the capability it is illegal to use it, regardless if the capability is shut off or disabled.  Unless I am misunderstanding what you mean by having the faceplate on it.

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