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Anchored Putter Method Poll of TST Membership - Page 2

Poll Results: Do you currently use an anchored putter technique?

 
  • 5% (4)
    Yes, I anchor my putter against my body
  • 94% (72)
    No I putt in a convensionaly manner
76 Total Votes  
post #19 of 55

I checked the less gramaticaly choice.

 

And yeah ... 10% seems inordinantly high.

post #20 of 55
Tried both. Anchoring didn't help me.

I would estimate that at least half of the over-50 golfers at my club are using long putters.
post #21 of 55

My handicap has gone up a stroke per month for the last three months. This has been due to putting. My ball striking has actually improved over this period. I was to the point where I was considering trying a long putter, then along comes this rule. We have several good players at our course that use long putters. As good as these guys are, they are better people. I have been dealing with the frustration of good ball striking and bad putting, so I think I know what kind of thoughts these guys might face when they can no longer use their long putters. I would really hate it if these guys quit playing with us as a result. The reason we play is to have fun. If players that can't putt with a short putter don't have fun, they'll quit. It will be a loss for our club if we lose good people over something that has been allowed for 30 years, and now will be against the rules.

post #22 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Agree. In the last 3 years, playing 100+ rounds a year, I bet I haven't seen 5 people using an anchored putter....

Same here.  I can't recall seeing anyone in the last couple of years.  Certainly no one I have played with.  I play about 50 rounds per year.

 

 

 

Quote:
I wouldnt exactly call this forum representative of the general golfing public.

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Agreed.  I just wanted to see what TST members do.

post #23 of 55

I don't use or have ever used an anchored putter.  Tried some buddies' a few time on the practice greens but just didn't seem to do anything for me.  Maybe with practice but while I could use better putting (who couldn't) an anchored putter  didn't seem the way for me.

post #24 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by caniac6 View Post

My handicap has gone up a stroke per month for the last three months. This has been due to putting. My ball striking has actually improved over this period. I was to the point where I was considering trying a long putter, then along comes this rule. 

 

 

My answer to this is back to basics.  If you used to be a good putter and you aren't now, then something has changed fundamentally in your stroke.  That's just an analysis and practice issue, not a putter issue.

 

Quote:
We have several good players at our course that use long putters. As good as these guys are, they are better people. I have been dealing with the frustration of good ball striking and bad putting, so I think I know what kind of thoughts these guys might face when they can no longer use their long putters. I would really hate it if these guys quit playing with us as a result. The reason we play is to have fun. If players that can't putt with a short putter don't have fun, they'll quit. It will be a loss for our club if we lose good people over something that has been allowed for 30 years, and now will be against the rules.

 

In part, the same answer.  I can't believe that anyone who plays much golf is incapable of learning to putt with a standard putter.  With some of the high MOI models available, mishits are not really punished,and twisting is more difficult so it's easier to get the ball started on the intended line.  Aside from that it's just green reading and judging speed, and a putter won't help that.  Anchoring isn't the only horse in the race.  People played and enjoyed golf for 500 years before anyone thought of an extended putter, so I can't see your argument as relevant.  If people feel that they have to quit because of this change, then there is more missing from their psychological makeup than just bad putting.  

post #25 of 55

I dont anchor.  Ive tried long/belly putters and didnt like it.  To me, it felt like it took all the feel out of putting.  It did help to smooth out my stroke though.

post #26 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stretch View Post

... I would estimate that at least half of the over-50 golfers at my club are using long putters.

Ditto on Stretch's observation. I see mainly the over-50, and a few high schoolers. Not many 20-somethings seem to use them in our area.

 

I tried an early belly putter about 10 years ago for a couple of days... used it a lot on the putting green, and played a few holes. It appears I got odd results:

  • From 40 to 60 feet away, I got it inside the two-foot circle most of the time.
  • That said, I only made one putt of more than 8 feet. Just couldn't get the tempo for shorter putts. (One person suggested I carry a second putter for clean-up).

 

Back in May, I went to an area demo day and got some time with an Odyssey putting rep.  I did best with a belly-length putter, anchored under my sternum and using a two-handed stroke. The rep said you need to figure out where you're going to anchor it, and then get proper shaft length.

 

I suspect a belly putter would not make a difference on my good putting days, but would probably help me avoid those slump weeks when the putts just aren't rolling very well. For the time being, however, I'll continue to use my 33" Ping B60.

 

I think the anchored putting thing is a matter of balance. Golf's high priests claim they're trying to grow the game, and yet they decide to ban anchored putting. It appears to work well for people who have the yips. Over-40 yips is actually a periodic nerve tremor in the hands. There's a scene from the movie "The Greatest Game Every Played," about the 1913 US Open, in which someone asks Harry Vardon why he's smoking on the course. "It calms me," he said. Possibly an early 1900s version of the yips.

 

I will be supporting those who go after the high priests to show them the wayward nature of the ruling.  What's next: a ban on sand wedges?

post #27 of 55
OK, had to do an informal survey during our year end tourney.

Out of 64 golfers in the tournament, 15 had long/belly putters.

I talked to a few of the guys that were playing with long putters and asked them if they had e-mailed the USGA regarding the new proposed rule and was told by most of them that they weren't sure that they would be alive that long.

I must play at one f-d up club according to this forum.
post #28 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

Ditto on Stretch's observation. I see mainly the over-50, and a few high schoolers. Not many 20-somethings seem to use them in our area.

 

I think the anchored putting thing is a matter of balance. Golf's high priests claim they're trying to grow the game, and yet they decide to ban anchored putting. It appears to work well for people who have the yips. Over-40 yips is actually a periodic nerve tremor in the hands. There's a scene from the movie "The Greatest Game Every Played," about the 1913 US Open, in which someone asks Harry Vardon why he's smoking on the course. "It calms me," he said. Possibly an early 1900s version of the yips.

 

 

Vardon's shaking was due to a bout he had with tuberculosis which came near to ending his career.

 

How far do you think golf should go to accommodate physical deterioration?  Should players who have gotten a restricted shoulder turn due to aging be allowed to use golf balls that exceed to regular limits?  Or longer drivers?

post #29 of 55

Conventional

post #30 of 55

In the last three years, I have seen two people use anchored putters.

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

 

How far do you think golf should go to accommodate physical deterioration?  Should players who have gotten a restricted shoulder turn due to aging be allowed to use golf balls that exceed to regular limits?  Or longer drivers?

 

This is the question I always ask.  Why is it the job of the Guardians of the Rules to accommodate physical disability?  A player who is unable to compete within the rules can still play all he wants to, any way he wants to, even to the point of playing and competing with a group of friends who allow the modifications he requires.  No law says that the Rules of Golf are required for a private, self managed league or informal group of players.  Nobody is blocking this sort of arrangement.

 

However, if a player wants to keep an official handicap and compete in an organized association, then he has to commit to playing by the actual Rules of Golf as maintained by the USGA and the R&A.  

post #32 of 55

I putted conventional for many years, then tried cross-handed about 15 years ago (thanks to Earl Woods) and liked it.

About 10 years ago I was in a serious car accident and developed a lot of lower back issues.

Went to a belly putter (still crosshanded), thought it would ease stresses on lower back.

Found it worked well in 5-10 foot range, but never really felt comfortable on short putts, and it was less accurate on long putts.

After a while I actually started developing the yips on long putts.

Got rid of the long putter and the crosshanded, went back to basics with a conventional putter.

It has taken several years, but I think I am putting better than ever.

 

Agree with previous comments that it doesn't really help with back issues.  Stretching and strength exercises work much better.

post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

 

This is the question I always ask.  Why is it the job of the Guardians of the Rules to accommodate physical disability?  

However, if a player wants to keep an official handicap and compete in an organized association, then he has to commit to playing by the actual Rules of Golf as maintained by the USGA and the R&A.  

 

Including these.

 

http://www.usga.org/rules/disabilities/Rules-for-golfers-with-disabilities/

post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rulesman View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

 

This is the question I always ask.  Why is it the job of the Guardians of the Rules to accommodate physical disability?  

However, if a player wants to keep an official handicap and compete in an organized association, then he has to commit to playing by the actual Rules of Golf as maintained by the USGA and the R&A.  

 

Including these.

 

http://www.usga.org/rules/disabilities/Rules-for-golfers-with-disabilities/

 

I was referring to what some in this thread are calling disability, to wit, the yips, or a simple inability to putt the normal way.  Your link addresses an entirely different issue.

post #35 of 55

I putt "conventionally", which is to say badly, but with a trail hand low, non-anchored grip using a 34" putter.  I know several guys who use belly putters, though.  Not too many that use a long chest/chin anchored putter, but I'd say that about 1/3rd of the <5 HCP guys I've played with in the last 4 years used an anchored putter.

post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post


I wouldnt exactly call this forum representative of the general golfing public.
Not that there's anything wrong with that.

 

Why do you say that?

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