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Getting back into the game...where to start?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I haven't played a round or swung a club in a little over two years, but I am thinking about getting back in the game.  Does anyone have some recommended exercises that I could do to condition?

 

I'd rather not go out there and be in pain for a week after 

post #2 of 6

Golf is a full body game. There is so much information on how to work out. But i would not do golf specific work outs unless you have some decent overall physical body conditioning. For one, overall health will increase your endurance on the course and help your golf game and your life.

 

 

Quads

Full Squat, i know some people say its bad for your knees, this is false, full squats strengthen the knees and increase hip flexor flexibility. I would recommend starting off just using your own body weight, or if this is to much, get two resistance bands, tie them off and then hold on to one in each hand as you go down, this will help with balance. Place your feet just at or just outside shoulder width apart. Point your feet 30 degrees out, do not keep them straight. The key is to lower yourself vertically, meaning keeping your shoudlers moving in a vertical line,  not shifting forward or backward. To do this you must have your hips tuck back as you lower down. Go down so your knees are just below parallel, then raise up firing your hips forward. 

 

Split Squats, place one foot about 3 feet behind you. What you want to do is lower your self down till your front leg is 90 degrees, then lift yourself up, keep your upper body moving in a vertical line

 

Gluts

youtube any of the glut exercises by Bret Contreras, he's done a tone of research on glut exercises. But you can modify alot of them to be body weight or lighter weight. He does a ton of heavy barbell stuff, but the movements what counts

Hip Thrusters, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZuM4pB4duQ

 

Hamstrings,

Deadlifts, back extensions

 

Chest

Dumbbell bench press, chest flies

 

upper back

dumbbell rows, face pulls

 

Shoulders

shoulder press, lateral raises

 

Lats

Alot of back exercises work lats, but you can do kneeling cable pull downs or if possible chin ups and pull ups

 

Biceps

Bicep curls, concentration curls

 

Triceps

Rope cable extensions

 

 

any needed explanations, go to youtube

 

Basically what i do is hit every area 2-3 times per week in a full body workout. I would start off lighter than you think and see how many reps you can do, if you can do 15 or more, than add 5 lbs and try again. You want to get to 6-8 reps. Also, doing the light first will help you get use to the exercise. Remember, DO NOT rush the movements, for example, no using your legs to help with shoulder press, like a jumping motion, that's cheating. Remember all movements should not be stressfull, you should be able to do them in fluid motions, 1 second up,  1 second down. If you want to do harder, 1 second up, then take longer to go down. 

 

My Core work out is a good one i think

1-3) first three exercises of P90 X ab ripper

Band Static Hold, take a resistance band, tie off one end, grab it so you are always in tension. Then holding the band away from your body, turn so your arms form a 90 degree angle with the band. Contract your abs to keep yourself from rotating. Hold for 30 seconds, then pulse by rotating back and forth for 15 reps. 

 

Band side bends, step on the resistance band near the handle, then grab the end. Perform a side bend, only grab one side

 

Bench Leg Lifts, Lay on the bench, bring your chin to your chest, raise and lower your legs from horizontal to vertical, your butt should just be on the bence

 

Bosu Ball work, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpWhDADsJVM , these are painfull ;) 

 

Crunches, i like to lay down on an incline, take two dumbbells, keeping my arms vertical push up in a crunch, this is a pretty nasty variant ;) 

 

Planks and side planks, hold each for how ever long you can. 

 

After that your abs should be destroyed :p 

 

After gaining sufficient ability, you can add things in like cable chops, and medicine ball plyometrics. Just learning how to sprint will help because that trains fast muscle fibers in the legs and gluts. Which fire fast in the downswing. 

post #3 of 6

All good suggestions but....don't  forget to stretch! I can quote the benefits of stretching all day long and those who don't think they should are probably too young to understand the huge benefit of doing it now, and that it's never too late.

 

Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine. You may think that going out and playing any sport, especially golf, after not playing for a period of time is OK and all you have to do is work out a little prior to. The main concern is exercising, not stretching, right?

 

Not so fast.  Stretching may help you improve your flexibility, which in turn may improve your athletic performance and decrease your risk of injury. Understand why stretching can help — and how to stretch correctly.

Benefits of stretching

Young or old.....limber or stiff....fact is in most cases everyone needs to incorporate a solid stretching routine in their daily work out. The main benefits of stretching are thought to be:

  • Improving athletic performance
  • Decreasing the risk of activity-based injuries

Stretching can help improve flexibility. And better flexibility may improve your performance in physical activities or decrease your risk of injuries by helping your joints move through their full range of motion. For instance, say your lower back muscles are tight and lack flexibility. If you do a lot of playing and swinging of the club, your upper body and torso may not move through its full range of motion.

 

Over time, this can increase your risk of injury. Proper stretching the major muscles used in the golf swing, though, may improve the range of motion. Increased range of motion equates into longer distance, more accurate shots and better play overall not to mention much less risk of injury.

Stretching also increases blood flow to the muscle. And you may come to enjoy the ritual of stretching before — after — and even during your round of golf. Think about a good stretching regiment and be sure to include it into your routine. 10 short minutes of stretching a day may save you a lifetime of stiffness.

Stretch it out!

post #4 of 6

I would put this into context,

 

Static Stretching before exercise should only be done in cases of extreme muscle tightness, or extreme inflexibility. So if you are just starting working out, i would static stretch before working out just so you have access to your full range of motion. In all other cases static stretching should not be done before exercise because it decreases power output (how much you can lift). 

 

If you are going to stretch before working out, do some dynamic stretching, basically moving the body, and progressively increasing the range of motion, not holding a position. 

 

Also research has shown that it might actually be more beneficial to static stretch later on in the day after the person has successfully cooled down from there weight lifting, 3-4 hours after working out. Its seems that since blood flow and inflammation are high after weight lifting, its better to stretch after given time for the muscles to cool down. Really if you think about it, your muscles are most flexible after working out, you have put them through a full range of motion. 

 

Also, studies have shown that there is no significant difference in the gained range of motion between weight lifting and static stretching, basically the body will become more limber based on genetics, and a person's activity. A study was done on a group of people with limited hamstring mobility, and the gain in hamstring mobility was with in half a degree of motion between a form of hamstring exercises and static stretching. Now i will say that weight lifting is limited in motion, so static stretching (as in yoga) has a superior advantage of stretching specific muscles that would be tougher to get a stretch on by using weight lifting. 

 

Basically Static stretching can be used before working out, if the individual is very inflexible to the point its a detriment to technique. Otherwise dynamic stretching is much better before weight lifting. Static stretching should be saved for later in the day after muscle have cooled down. Also, static stretching is probably better in getting flexibility in muscles that are not fully stretched with an exercise. 

 

 

Also just on working out, be cautious of what your body is telling you. People just keep adding on to workouts and they wonder why they end up injured. So if you plan on adding something to a workout routine, really think of what your adding on and if you need to drop something else. 

post #5 of 6

Exercise is such a personal thing. For it to work and be sustainable it has to be something you enjoy doing. You can google golf fitness or look at vids on youtube for some golf specific moves. For everything else I'd experiment until you find something that works for you. I've gotten to the point where my routine is so routine it's just another part of my day. Kind of like taking a shower, it's automatic.

post #6 of 6

Dynamic Stretching combinations are also available for pre-round or pre-range warm-ups. Expanding on saeval25, the stretches tend toward purposeful motion, movements which will warm the muscles and mimic parts of the golf swing. Mine has four dynamic stretches, and ends with a dozen full swings of increasing speed. I keep the page inside a plastic sleeve in my golf bag.

 

My routine comes from a trainer named Kevin Henzel: http://www.fitness-nutrition-weightloss.com/golf-warm-up-exercises.html

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