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Worried about my "Golf pro" - Page 2

post #19 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmazingWhacker View Post

 

Agreed.  I heard Bubba Watson has had less than 4 lessons . .so 4 lessons ought to be more than enough.

Awesome. Watch for me at Augusta fellas.

post #20 of 54

My advice to you is to determine what kind of player you want to be ....i.e. are you new to the game? If so use the "pro" to take you through the bag and introduce you to all the clubs and their purposes , etc. After that the best and fastest way to learn is to get out on the course as often as possible....only by getting yourself into trouble (aka "the easy part") and getting out of it will you learn how to play this game in real time. Perhaps you can find teaching pros with good references to fall back upon when you discover various issues in your game....i.e. maybe a lesson or two with a driver, putter etc...

 

BTW: I used a club "pro" for precisely this purpose and was also disappointed with their knowledge, and teaching abilities/metghods,etc.

 

As a career educator and professor perhaps my standards are high....but I know others who have had similarly unpleasant experiences....consequently I do not place a great deal of credence in all this "see your PGA teaching pro" stuff.....beware of any teachers who's next paycheck is determined by your next lesson... good luck!

post #21 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stogiesnbogies View Post

My advice to you is to determine what kind of player you want to be ....i.e. are you new to the game? If so use the "pro" to take you through the bag and introduce you to all the clubs and their purposes , etc. After that the best and fastest way to learn is to get out on the course as often as possible....only by getting yourself into trouble (aka "the easy part") and getting out of it will you learn how to play this game in real time. Perhaps you can find teaching pros with good references to fall back upon when you discover various issues in your game....i.e. maybe a lesson or two with a driver, putter etc...

 

BTW: I used a club "pro" for precisely this purpose and was also disappointed with their knowledge, and teaching abilities/metghods,etc.

 

As a career educator and professor perhaps my standards are high....but I know others who have had similarly unpleasant experiences....consequently I do not place a great deal of credence in all this "see your PGA teaching pro" stuff.....beware of any teachers who's next paycheck is determined by your next lesson... good luck!

I've actually been playing for about 20 years and usually shoot mid/high 90s. My goal is to have a legitimate shot at breaking 90 on a consistant basis, which I feel is a realistic goal because I average 6-8 totally wasted iron/wedge shots a round and that's where I want to spend my lesson time.

post #22 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsknicks1 View Post

I've actually been playing for about 20 years and usually shoot mid/high 90s. My goal is to have a legitimate shot at breaking 90 on a consistant basis, which I feel is a realistic goal because I average 6-8 totally wasted iron/wedge shots a round and that's where I want to spend my lesson time.

Sounds like you know what you want....now you need to find a teaching pro who can give you what you need.  Ask around and seek out recommendations for good instructors. The guy you were seeing is not the only swing coach in the world. And then talk to him about your specific goals and how to set a clearly defined course of instruction. Yes, you must interview these guys before hiring them. Go with your instincts regarding which one is best for you and can provide you with the most help in accomplishing YOUR goals - not theirs.

Good Luck.

post #23 of 54

Like anything else there are good teaching pros and bad ones. Working in the golf business as long as I have (15 years) I have seen many come and go. You are the customer, do not be afraid to voice your opinion on how you want this to go. he needs to put the phone down and pay attention or you should ask him if you can trade the remaining lessons in for proshop credit and by some golf balls or something.

post #24 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NM Golf View Post

Like anything else there are good teaching pros and bad ones. Working in the golf business as long as I have (15 years) I have seen many come and go. You are the customer, do not be afraid to voice your opinion on how you want this to go. he needs to put the phone down and pay attention or you should ask him if you can trade the remaining lessons in for proshop credit and by some golf balls or something.

Because my wife pre paid for the lessons, I feel like I'm kinda locked into this guy. My first lesson is Sunday and I'll go into it with an open mind BUT I will also make sure to explain my goals before the first swing happens.

post #25 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsknicks1 View Post

Because my wife pre paid for the lessons, I feel like I'm kinda locked into this guy. My first lesson is Sunday and I'll go into it with an open mind BUT I will also make sure to explain my goals before the first swing happens.

Yeah, you kinda owe it to her to use the lessons, with her being all considerate and all, getting them for you.

 

I would suggest to just take everything that you are unsure of, and bring it here and bounce it off all of the bright teachers on this site.  And anything they say is a big no-no, just ignore that part of the lesson and don't implement it. :)

post #26 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Yeah, you kinda owe it to her to use the lessons, with her being all considerate and all, getting them for you.

 

I would suggest to just take everything that you are unsure of, and bring it here and bounce it off all of the bright teachers on this site.  And anything they say is a big no-no, just ignore that part of the lesson and don't implement it. :)


I don't see why this would be any more necessary in this case than anyone else taking lessons.  I think the whole thing is being completely blown out of proportion given that fact that the meeting was to schedule the lessons, not discuss the curriculum.  There is a time and a place to discuss the goal and objectives and that is the first lesson.  It is the teaching on the range that counts.  And there is no reason to come to any conclusion about the guys teaching ability, good or bad, based on what the OP posted.  When I call the Drs. office to make an appointment I don't expect him to listen to a list of my aches and pains.  That is what the Drs. visit is for.

post #27 of 54

If I was the pro I wouldn't be too pissed if you cancelled the lessons

post #28 of 54
 
 
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Yeah, you kinda owe it to her to use the lessons, with her being all considerate and all, getting them for you.

 

I would suggest to just take everything that you are unsure of, and bring it here and bounce it off all of the bright teachers on this site.  And anything they say is a big no-no, just ignore that part of the lesson and don't implement it. :)


I don't see why this would be any more necessary in this case than anyone else taking lessons.  I think the whole thing is being completely blown out of proportion given that fact that the meeting was to schedule the lessons, not discuss the curriculum.  There is a time and a place to discuss the goal and objectives and that is the first lesson.  It is the teaching on the range that counts.  And there is no reason to come to any conclusion about the guys teaching ability, good or bad, based on what the OP posted.  When I call the Drs. office to make an appointment I don't expect him to listen to a list of my aches and pains.  That is what the Drs. visit is for.


Well I agree with turtleback here but in a business aspect some pros are horrible and jaded. They don't often want to perpetuate a bunch of conversation before getting on the clock. Also there are ones that just are not giving with info unless you are paying which generally backfires for business imho. My pro is an older guy and if I casually talk about my game he gets the deer in headlights look or the look like he can see through me. I really don't want any info from him but he probably thinks I am milking him for some or he is tired of hearing the same ol same ol. Give the lesson a shot.... maybe talk up buying more lessons, and if you see dollars signs in his eyes..... there is his motivation.

 
post #29 of 54
Thread Starter 

Well I just got back from my first lesson and will have to admit that my intial impression was wrong.. He showed up on time, was professional and attentive and got his points across in a manner that was both easy to follow and implement. Most importantly, I was hitting the ball markedly(sp) better after the first lesson and I'm looking forward to the second.

post #30 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsknicks1 View Post

Well I just got back from my first lesson and will have to admit that my intial impression was wrong.. He showed up on time, was professional and attentive and got his points across in a manner that was both easy to follow and implement. Most importantly, I was hitting the ball markedly(sp) better after the first lesson and I'm looking forward to the second.

 

Very cool!  Three more lessons and you're on to Q-school.  :-)

post #31 of 54
Good to hear. Glad everything worked out.
post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsknicks1 View Post

Well I just got back from my first lesson and will have to admit that my intial impression was wrong.. He showed up on time, was professional and attentive and got his points across in a manner that was both easy to follow and implement. Most importantly, I was hitting the ball markedly(sp) better after the first lesson and I'm looking forward to the second.

 

Like my Grandfather used to tell me, "Most of the things I ever worried about never happened."

post #33 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave67az View Post

 

Very cool!  Three more lessons and you're on to Q-school.  :-)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

 

Like my Grandfather used to tell me, "Most of the things I ever worried about never happened."

Thanks guys. What's funny is that I went back to the range later and couldn't hit a single shot! :) Guess I just gotta keep working.      Sigh, golf is hard.

post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsknicks1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dave67az View Post

 

Very cool!  Three more lessons and you're on to Q-school.  :-)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post

 

Like my Grandfather used to tell me, "Most of the things I ever worried about never happened."

Thanks guys. What's funny is that I went back to the range later and couldn't hit a single shot! :) Guess I just gotta keep working.      Sigh, golf is hard.

 

"a challenge"  a2_wink.gif

post #35 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valleygolfer View Post

 

"a challenge"  a2_wink.gif

That's the truth! Very frustrating that I was hittng the ball very well during and right after the lesson but then so badly later on.

post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsknicks1 View Post

That's the truth! Very frustrating that I was hittng the ball very well during and right after the lesson but then so badly later on.

 

I have a feeling the vast majority of us have a "been there, done that" reaction.  I can't count the number of times I've worked out kinks on the range, for example, only to get on the course and somehow forget everything I learned.  I believe this is where repetition of the correct mechanics, to the point that they become second nature, comes into play.

 

The grip is a perfect example, for me at least.  Most of us had to think about the grip when we started learning the game.  Every time we'd pick up a club, we'd look down and think about it while we were getting our hands into the correct position, making sure the V's were in the right spot, making sure the grip hit our hands and fingers in the right spots, etc.  I rarely think about my grip anymore, because I've done it so many times that it's second nature to put my hands in the right position.  The trick is to get a proper swing ingrained as well as my grip, and therein lies the biggest challenge for me (particularly when, until recently, I thought I had a better swing than I really did because I made the mistake of playing for years before taking any lessons or videoing my swing).

 

The fact that you had good results should tell you that you are capable of producing good golf.  You just need to find it again.  But at least you had it for a short time!  That's more than many can say!

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