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What's wrong with hitting it straight? - Page 4

post #55 of 122
Oceanvue, the ball does not know whether the golfer is a lefty or a righty. A right handers draw could be hit with the same properties as a left handers fade.
post #56 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post

You should have Physics introduce you to Reality. 

 

 

yeah, he already did..and he's waiting on you to come join us.

post #57 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by 14ledo81 View Post

Oceanvue, the ball does not know whether the golfer is a lefty or a righty. A right handers draw could be hit with the same properties as a left handers fade.

Yea OK and the launch dynamics for a louie  would be the same as a roscoe. This issue has been showing up for years on this and other golf related boards and it is always the same, those who say there is no difference are talking about a ball with the same trajectory and rotation properties whether biased right or left would be the same (which of course is true) and those that say the draw will out total distance a fade are talking about as impacted by a golf swing and connection with a club face. Fades are cut or pushed with an open face and draws are out side in delofting the club.  We're not shooting these balls with a potato gun or a launching with a jugs machine

post #58 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradox View Post

 

 

yeah, he already did..and he's waiting on you to come join us.

I'll bring my buddy Common Sense and we'll make it a foursome

post #59 of 122

OP - hit it straight and then stand back and stifle a grin watching other 19+ handicappers slice and pull hook every shot all over the damn golf course. At your handicap, I'd worry more about 100 yds in, getting up and down in 2 from 40 yards out, and averaging less than 36 putts a round.

 

This no shot is every really straight deal is great in theory, but if you can hit it straight down the middle, fine.  I seriously doubt you will be psychologically damaged by not being able to curve one towards a target. Its fun, don't get me wrong, but its not gonna save you a bunch of strokes every round.  I've played with plenty of guys who hit 85 to 90% of their shots straight and even their misses curved so little that they didn't need more than half the fairway to keep it in the short grass.

 

Learning to move the ball both directions is a goal that I think most golfers should aspire to, but hitting it straight isn't such a bad habit for most higher handicappers.

 

Of course, I never tell anyone  "Hit 'em straight"  I'm afraid they will stop and try to explain how no one ever really hits 'em straight.

post #60 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post


Fades are cut or pushed with an open face and draws are out side in delofting the club.

Huh? I can easily hit a fade with an outside/in swing and delofted club face......

The determining factor, fade vs draw, is simply whether the club face is open or closed relative to the swing path. That's all there is to it......
post #61 of 122

Ocean, let's be clear about a few things.

 

  1. Theories are one thing. A lefty draw could be a righty fade, absolutely. In the real world, though, golfers rarely have the same impact conditions when they're hitting a fade versus hitting a draw. That part remains true.
  2. However, some golfers hit pull-fades (and the ball spins less, and the clubhead has LESS delivered loft) than the golfers who hit push-draws.
  3. You're citing age old advice about a draw "going farther" because most golfers, in particular lousy golfers, hit pull-draws when they manage to hit a "draw" and those tend to go farther than the weak, wiped slices they usually hit with flipping.
  4. The actual delivered loft doesn't care about the target - (ignoring things like shaft flexibility, tip stiffness, etc.) it cares only about shaft lean and face angle relative to that particular golfer's alignment. Given the same shaft lean, a face pointing farther right has more loft than one pointing left (for a RHG).

 

Given all of that, it's basically pointless to discuss what goes farther. I can hit a pull-fade farther than a push-draw, and I can hit a pull-draw farther than a push-fade. I can also hit a push-draw farther than a push-fade, and for some clubs, could carry a pull-fade farther than a pull-draw. And I could probably do the opposite of all of those things, too.

 

In general, draws go farther for most golfers because most golfers normally hit weak, wipey cuts and the few times a year they hit a "draw" it's with better, more efficient impact dynamics. As you'd likely agree, there's nothing magical about a draw tilted spin axis that makes the ball go farther.

 

Now, to your particular post:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post

Fades are cut or pushed with an open face and draws are out side in delofting the club.

 

I'd like to ask for clarification here, as I don't believe you said things the way you intended to say them.

 

A swing path that's "outside in" is far, far more commonly seen among faders, slicers, and people who pull the golf ball.

A swing path that's "inside out" is far, far more commonly seen among drawers, hookers, and people who push the golf ball.

 

Please clarify what you meant to say in that statement. Thank you.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Huh? I can easily hit a fade with an outside/in swing and delofted club face......

The determining factor, fade vs draw, is simply whether the club face is open or closed relative to the swing path. That's all there is to it......

 

Assuming center contact, yes. (That often goes without saying, but sometimes bears mentioning if we want to be all up in someone's semantics. :D).

post #62 of 122

 

In general, draws go farther for most golfers because most golfers normally hit weak, wipey cuts and the few times a year they hit a "draw" it's with better, more efficient impact dynamics. As you'd likely agree, there's nothing magical about a draw tilted spin axis that makes the ball go farther.

 

 

and there's your answer folks

post #63 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post

 

In general, draws go farther for most golfers because most golfers normally hit weak, wipey cuts and the few times a year they hit a "draw" it's with better, more efficient impact dynamics. As you'd likely agree, there's nothing magical about a draw tilted spin axis that makes the ball go farther.

 

 

and there's your answer folks

???

 

Does this supersede everything else you've stated in this thread??

 

So draws go further because people who play fades suck? Pretty sure Bubba can hit a fade a helluva lot further than I (or pretty much anyone on this forum) can hit a draw.


Edited by Ernest Jones - 2/11/13 at 12:17pm
post #64 of 122

the question is can Bubba hit a draw farther then he hits a fade not whether a pro hits a fade farther then an amateur hits a draw. Clear?

post #65 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post

the question is can Bubba hit a draw farther then he hits a fade not whether a pro hits a fade farther then an amateur hits a draw. Clear?

We are, but you clearly aren't.  First of all, that is not the question.  Second of all, Erik already explained to you that that is wrong.  (Even though you seem to oddly think that he validated your view)

post #66 of 122

I think there is nothing wrong with hitting a ball straight and in fact I will go out on a limb and say it's a good thing (Disclaimer: in most cases)

post #67 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post

 

In general, draws go farther for most golfers because most golfers normally hit weak, wipey cuts and the few times a year they hit a "draw" it's with better, more efficient impact dynamics. As you'd likely agree, there's nothing magical about a draw tilted spin axis that makes the ball go farther.

 

 

and there's your answer folks

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oceanvue View Post

the question is can Bubba hit a draw farther then he hits a fade not whether a pro hits a fade farther then an amateur hits a draw. Clear?

No I guess I'm not clear on your position. Sorry about that. Your previous post implied that fades don't go as far because the are weak, wipey strikes by crappy golfers.

 

That makes about as much sense as saying that forged irons are more accurate because hacks play cast.

post #68 of 122

I really dislike this dudes avatar... f2_kiss.gif

post #69 of 122

Is Oceanvue Patrick57?  He seems to use the same pattern of contradiction but in shorter posts.

post #70 of 122

 

"In general, draws go farther for most golfers because most golfers normally hit weak, wipey cuts and the few times a year they hit a "draw" it's with better, more efficient impact dynamics"

 

 

 

 

that was a quote from from a post above sans the quotation marks. There I fixed it

post #71 of 122

Was thinking the same thing. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachcomber View Post

I really dislike this dudes avatar... f2_kiss.gif

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post

Is Oceanvue Patrick57?  He seems to use the same pattern of contradiction but in shorter posts.

post #72 of 122

Not Patrick but I too was raised on Guam

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