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Shorten club = add lead tape?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hello.  I'm pretty inexperienced at the finer points of club building/making/fitting but I think I understand some of it.  By that I mean I do all of my own grips, but I digest.

 

I need to shorten my wedges about 1/4".  Turns out Titleist added about 1/4" to their "standard" some time between when I purchased my 962s in 1999 and when I got my SM(CC) wedges two years ago.

 

So...when I do this, how much weight do I need to add to the head to maintain the same (relative) feel?

 

Additionally, should I be shortening from the tip end or butt end?  My irons (962) are 2-P with X100 straight in and will be bent 2-flat here shortly.  My wedges (48, 52) are S300 and the others (56, 60) are S200.  They'll be bent to match shortly.  I'm thinking that tipping is probably the way to go, but at the same time disassembling 4 clubs for 1/4" adjustment on each seems a bit "excessive".

 

Also, I've always been a standard L/L/L player but have noticed a lot of shots starting left since I've been working on some new swing ideas.  So that's the reason for bending the clubs.  When they're bent, will that throw off the swingweight any?  Will I need to compensate?

 

Thank you for any advice.

post #2 of 11

Not sure why you're shortening your wedges 1/4". Will this bring them into shaft-length match with the 962 irons?

 

Make sure your wedges are uniform in their shaft length differences. Try for either 1/4" or 1/2" in between. See this link on wedge-fitting: http://www.ralphmaltby.com/17

 

As for shortening the clubs, trim from the butt end. Tip trimming would increase the stiffness of the shaft.

 

For every 1/2" you trim off the butt end of the shaft, you decrease the swingweight by three factors (for example, goes from D4 to D1). To recapture the swing weight, you would need to put lead tape on the back of the clubhead. You also can pull out the shaft, tip weight it, and reinstall it. But for 1/4" (about 1.5 swingweights), tape makes more sense. You can tell how much lead tape you need by putting the trimmed and regripped wedge on a swingweight machine, and draping a segment of tape (with the backing still on it) over the head to see how the swingweight will change.

 

Tip weighting would make more sense if you were trimming a wood shaft from 46" to 44.5", or replacing shaft A with shaft B at a different shaft length.

 

Lie change: This won't affect swingweight.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

Not sure why you're shortening your wedges 1/4". Will this bring them into shaft-length match with the 962 irons?

Yes.  As I said above, sometime between 1999 and 2010 Titleist added 1/4" to their "standard" length measurement.  Since I'm a pretty "standard" person, that's what was always ordered for me.  Well, that now has my 48* wedge (Vokey SM-CC) the same length as my 9-iron and 1/4" longer than my 962 PW (also 48*).  So I'm shortening the wedges to get them back in line with where they should be for me.  I'm looking for consistent yardage gaps and I want to give myself every opportunity to ensure that.  The wedges will have 1/2" length increments when finished.

 

I know that tipping stiffens the shaft and that's why I was wondering if it was worthwhile due to the X100/S300/S200 shafts in my irons/pw-gw/sw-lw respectively.  I figured it would stiffen the S300 and S200 just a touch which may be a good "feel" transition.  But if butt trimming is the way to go, that's fine too.  I just don't know how all of that works.

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by minitour View Post

... The wedges will have 1/2" length increments when finished. ...

 

... I know that tipping stiffens the shaft and that's why I was wondering if it was worthwhile due to the X100/S300/S200 shafts in my irons/pw-gw/sw-lw respectively.  I figured it would stiffen the S300 and S200 just a touch which may be a good "feel" transition.  But if butt trimming is the way to go, that's fine too.  I just don't know how all of that works.

1/2" increments: Good call. 1/2" + 4° loft change = about 10 yds.* difference in distance on full shots. This will give you a consistent yardstick for your wedge package.

 

Both the S300 and S200 shafts on the wedges are softer than the X100 shafts. But, common dynamics for all three shaft models are high bend point (low launch) and firm tip, and uncut weight of 130 grams.

 

Your softer wedge shafts would deliver similar benefits as the TT Spinner and Cleveland TRAction shafts: designed for low launch, but softer tip flex. If you'll use your wedges primarily for partial shots, the S200 and S300 shafts will help you out. (See Spinner-Flex shaft specs for details).

 

Historic note: Nicklaus supposedly had his 1970s-era wedges tipped for 8 iron - meaning he had super softstep to take out a little stiffners for up-close shots.

 

* 60° lob wedge may have a bit less yardage on full shots, since full swing may simply send ball higher rather than much farther.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
That's fine. Distance is not a problem and I'm a big believer in the Pelz methods (especially the 3x4 wedge system) so I'm sure I can fill that gap with a 7:30 and/or 9:00 56* wedge.

Thanks for the input and advice.
post #6 of 11
I was thinking of shortening my Nike str8 fit driver to a 44.5. Should I ask the club maker to take it from tip? I just wanted to cut brom butt and re grip. Not even sure what the vodoo shaft is. I figured 46 like most drivers now. I grip down so far now I figured just chop to get better control. Is this not a good idea? Will it mess up the swing characteristics of the Club? Thanks
post #7 of 11

Trim from the butt unless you want to stiffen the shaft. And, some OEMs recommend you sent it back to factory for tip trim.

 

Nike Str8 Fit Tour is no longer a production model, so I'm not sure what the swingweight and stock shaft length is. (Nike doesn't archive it's prior-cycle equipment specs).

 

Basically, if it measures 46" and you trim off 1.5", this will decrease swingweight nine points. (See Post #2 this thread).

 

So, if you're swinging a D5 driver right now, the trim would reduce it to C6. To reset swingweight to D5, you would need to either put lead tape on the sole or head back, or have someone pull the shaft, tipweight it to get D5, and reinstall it.

 

Depends in part on how long you'll keep the driver, and how much you like the "tape" look.

post #8 of 11

WUTIGER,

 

I have actually never hit the driver. I bought it on the cheap to start fresh with a driver. Last year if I useed a driver 10 times it would have been a lot. I am just not comfortable with the driver. I am especially uncomfortable with the 46 inch length of some of the drivers on the market. I will be using a reg flex for the 1st time since all my previous drivers were stiff. My swing is for in toon with a reg flex according to the monitors at Golfsmith. 

 

I guess what I am asking is would I even know the difference in swingweight if I never hit the driver or had a real good feel for a previous one?

 

I am also going to have the hybrid trimmed a bit, Nike seems to make a rather long hybrid. I may consider getting rid of the 4 wood or trading it in because that was in a stiff flex also. Thanks

post #9 of 11

If you don't have a sense of where the clubhead is on your backswing, the driver is probably too light. The swingweight is how heavy the club feels during the swing.

 

Some people have similar problems with the 45 gram superlight graphite shafts: it's harder to "drop in the slot" consistently.

 

Also, it depends on how sensitive a golfer is to weight changes. I can't tell the difference between a D5 and a D3, but I can tell a D5 from a D0.

 

Before you get a reshaft, swing the club as is to see how you like the swingweight. Someone who is installing a new shaft can re-set the swingweight as you want it, even if you get the length trimmed shorter than standard. (You dislike 46" drivers).

post #10 of 11
I want to reshaft my driver but go shorter to increase accuracy. Everything ive heard or read suggests shorter is better, so i thought id give it a try. I currently game a 46.5" wilson dxi 10.5, with an S flex pro launch red and midsize golf pride new decade grip.

I'm getting the bimatrix tour prototype shaft and I want to play it at 44.5" but an concerned about the sw change.

Can I maintain swing weight (or lessen impact on feel) by adding 10g tip weight and switching to the standard GP grip which is about 10g lighter?

I want to avoid the tape solution if possible
post #11 of 11

The best way to check this out is to use a swingweight machine with a trays for measuring balance affect of components.

 

You would "preassemble" your driver with the tip weight in the head-end tray, and the grip in the butt-end tray. Yes, a lighter grip would help you gain swingweight points.

 

There's a proportional equation which you can use to determine swingweight adjustments, but it's a bit difficult to use if you don't repair clubs regularly. You could get the same results in about the same amount of time if you use the swingweight machine.

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