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What are your loft degrees in the wedges you carry? - Page 3

post #37 of 68

All Edel wedges: 48, 54, 60.


I use the 60 a LOT nowadays. Most bounce. Most glide. :)

 

You can go back to find posts of mine where I say I almost never use the 60. Why? Turns out because most of my 60s had only about 4° bounce.

post #38 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

You can go back to find posts of mine where I say I almost never use the 60. Why? Turns out because most of my 60s had only about 4° bounce.

 

I had a 60 with 4 degrees once. For a week. They don't do that great on the soft courses that I play most of the time. I found that 7-10 degrees on the 60 added more value to my game. 

post #39 of 68
46-52-58-64

I need to figure out if I need new gaps myself since I recently started swapping out the 64 for a 3 wood!
post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by TourSpoon View Post

I had a 60 with 4 degrees once. For a week. They don't do that great on the soft courses that I play most of the time. I found that 7-10 degrees on the 60 added more value to my game. 

 

Mine's got 22. Works great on hardpan, soft lies, sand, long grass, etc. I know you've been gone for a little bit, so more here.

post #41 of 68

Since my day gig involves project management, I look at everything the same way:  Determine scope, develop strategy, enlist tools to support strategy.  Same for my golf game:

 

Wedge Scope = reducing score;  Strategy = keeping ball from getting inside 80 yards of hole; Enlist tools = wedges that hit 110, 100, 90 and 80 shots effectively.

 

That said, my PW is 45, GW 50; SW 54 and LW is 58.  In the rare instance I end up with a 60 yard wedge shot, I use the 58 and open it up a bit.

 

Used to have a 60 LW, but didn't see much application for my approach to the game.

 

PW, GW and SW (for the most part) are used for full shots.  The 58 is my weapon of choice around the greens for hitting higher, softer, closer to the hole shots.  Other clubs are used for pitches and chips when needed, but I like to keep the same wedge in my hands as much as possible for shots around the green.

 

dave
 

post #42 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave s View Post

Wedge Scope = reducing score;  Strategy = keeping ball from getting inside 80 yards of hole; Enlist tools = wedges that hit 110, 100, 90 and 80 shots effectively.

 

The problem with that line of thinking is that you will get closer to the hole from 40 yards than you will from 80 with even the teeniest amount of practice.

post #43 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

The problem with that line of thinking is that you will get closer to the hole from 40 yards than you will from 80 with even the teeniest amount of practice.

 

I used to avoid leaving myself less than full wedges into greens because I was sure I did better with them than partial shots.

 

In the end I realised that I was only doing better with full wedges against my expectations. For a 40 yard pitch I was expecting to put it pretty close but not doing it very often, even missing the green occasionally. For a full wedge I'd miss the green more often but as my expectation wasn't as high, I didn't rate it as such a poor shot.

 

There are still times to leave a full wedge, like when you need more backspin on the shot, but I've realised that the closer you can get to the hole the better the result you'll get with a wedge.

post #44 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mordan View Post

 

I used to avoid leaving myself less than full wedges into greens because I was sure I did better with them than partial shots.

 

In the end I realised that I was only doing better with full wedges against my expectations. For a 40 yard pitch I was expecting to put it pretty close but not doing it very often, even missing the green occasionally. For a full wedge I'd miss the green more often but as my expectation wasn't as high, I didn't rate it as such a poor shot.

 

There are still times to leave a full wedge, like when you need more backspin on the shot, but I've realised that the closer you can get to the hole the better the result you'll get with a wedge.

 

Bold = Bingo.

post #45 of 68

I carry my R11 PW and the 56* and 60* wedges.

post #46 of 68

I also have an AW.

post #47 of 68

Bugger it, I'm confused already,I'm sure I need 50-51 deg wedge now that I think of it. Do all you wedges need to be the same manufacture because I don't think TM make a 50 or 51 l/h ATV wedge 

post #48 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shortylook View Post

Bugger it, I'm confused already,I'm sure I need 50-51 deg wedge now that I think of it. Do all you wedges need to be the same manufacture because I don't think TM make a 50 or 51 l/h ATV wedge 

Your clubs can be whatever they want.  Whatever feels good and works for you.  You could have 14 different clubs from 14 different manufacturers.

post #49 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCfanatic35 View Post

Your clubs can be whatever they want.  Whatever feels good and works for you.  You could have 14 different clubs from 14 different manufacturers.

Ok I just wasn't sure if your wedges should be all same. If I can't find a ATV l/h in 50-51 then ill be on the prowl for a 50 from someone else. I'm thinking vokey or Cleveland, even though I haven't even picked one of them up. All the commercials get me every time ha ha. I'm a gear bandit 

post #50 of 68

46, 50, 58, 64

post #51 of 68

I have found that I change it up often depending on where I"m playing. Most of the time I have a 52 and 58 in the bag. I can also be a 56 and 60 depending on the course I play. I like my wedges with very little bounce. Love those sharp edges! Actually I've been thinking of taking the 2 iron out and putting in another wedge.

post #52 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Interesting.  I checked my clubs and I only have 0.25" gaps in length from 9 iron on down.  37", 36.75", 36.50", 36.25", and 36" for the 59* lob wedge.

You're pretty much with the norm. Most manufacturers - both of iron sets with wedges, and specialty wedges (Vokey, Cle 588) - have gone to 1/4" shaft length differences between categories of wedges.

 

By categories, I mean PWs (46* and 48*) will have one shaft length, GW (50* and 52*) 1/4" shorter, and SW (54* and 56*) shorter still. Some recent Cleveland models only have 1/8" between categories.

 

I mention this because if you have a wedge package with 4* loft differences, the distance gaps between clubs will be greater with 1/2" shaft differences than 1/4" differences.

 

Club designer Ralph Maltby recommends that you keep the shaft-length differences even across the wedges for consistency. (This assumes your G, S and L wedges are from the same model).

post #53 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post

Interesting.  I checked my clubs and I only have 0.25" gaps in length from 9 iron on down.  37", 36.75", 36.50", 36.25", and 36" for the 59* lob wedge.

You're pretty much with the norm. Most manufacturers - both of iron sets with wedges, and specialty wedges (Vokey, Cle 588) - have gone to 1/4" shaft length differences between categories of wedges.

 

By categories, I mean PWs (46* and 48*) will have one shaft length, GW (50* and 52*) 1/4" shorter, and SW (54* and 56*) shorter still. Some recent Cleveland models only have 1/8" between categories.

 

I mention this because if you have a wedge package with 4* loft differences, the distance gaps between clubs will be greater with 1/2" shaft differences than 1/4" differences.

 

Club designer Ralph Maltby recommends that you keep the shaft-length differences even across the wedges for consistency. (This assumes your G, S and L wedges are from the same model).

 

That last is what I've always heard is the standard for wedges.  

post #54 of 68
I carry a 47-degree iron marked 'P' (this may or may not be a wedge depending), a 51-degree iron marked 'G', and a 56-degree sand wedge.

On full swings, the P and G might as well be irons. However, I am comfortable making half swings and quarter swings with my 9-iron, P, and G, and can cover just about every increment of ten yards out to full swings with the clubs with some combination of {half swing, quarter swing} and {9, P, G, 56}.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

You're pretty much with the norm. Most manufacturers - both of iron sets with wedges, and specialty wedges (Vokey, Cle 588) - have gone to 1/4" shaft length differences between categories of wedges.

By categories, I mean PWs (46* and 48*) will have one shaft length, GW (50* and 52*) 1/4" shorter, and SW (54* and 56*) shorter still. Some recent Cleveland models only have 1/8" between categories.

I mention this because if you have a wedge package with 4* loft differences, the distance gaps between clubs will be greater with 1/2" shaft differences than 1/4" differences.

Club designer Ralph Maltby recommends that you keep the shaft-length differences even across the wedges for consistency. (This assumes your G, S and L wedges are from the same model).

Do they tip the same way? I'm curious because I'm getting more and more into club building (and the Maltby forum seems to have died down quite a bit) and was wondering this the other day: if I wanted to hard step my irons, what would I do for my gap wedge (whether or not it's from the iron set)?
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